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"I Love Lucy" 1950's Norms

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by

Melissa Rangel

on 17 February 2014

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Transcript of "I Love Lucy" 1950's Norms

#1 TV Show in America 1952.
Record 66% of all TV’s tuned in to the show.
Sponsored by Philip Morris.
Philip Morris: The largest tobacco company in the U.S. Richmond, Virginia.
“I Love Lucy”
Men: Hard working and bringing home the bacon
Women: Zany and submissive
Children: Clean cut and obedient

Television Roles of the 1950s
In the 1950’s several cigarette companies were sponsors of TV shows.
Winston cigarettes advertised on “Gunsmoke” the longest running TV show in history.
1971:Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act (banned advertising on TV/radio).
TV’s link with Cigarettes
Men: Took classes in carpentry and auto.
Women: Took classes in typing, cooking, and etiquette.

1950s High School Education
Stereotype
Norm: A standard, model, or pattern. General level or average.
Example: Two cars per family is the norm for most suburban families.
“I Love Lucy”
1950: 5 million TV’s in America.
1952: 15 million TV’s in America.
TV Booms in the 50s
In the 1950’s companies actually owned TV shows.
Examples:
Texaco Star Theatre (1948-1956).
Colgate Comedy Hour (1950-1955).
These companies were a direct influence on production and content.
TV in the 1950s
20% of men
15% of women
18% of the adult population in the USA (42.1 million people)
Cigarette smoking today
1955:
57% of men smoked.
28% of women smoked.
Early 1950s:
66% of all physicians smoked.
1950:
1st study linking smoking to lung cancer.
Cigarette Smoking in the 1950s
Children were, generally, clean-cut and obedient.
Women were “happy homemakers.”
Fathers were the center of the household.
TV Reinforcing Social Norms
of the 1950’s

Average homemaker spent 3 hours cleaning, preparing meals, cooking, and feeding her family.
In 1950, 70% of men were in the work force.
Men were the breadwinners
Rules or standard of behavior shared by members of a social group.
Example: On Tuesday's we wear pink.
Social Norms
#1 TV Show in America 1952.
Record 66% of all TV’s tuned in to the show.
Sponsored by Philip Morris.
Philip Morris: The largest tobacco company in the U.S. Richmond, Virginia.
“I Love Lucy”
1950: 5 million TV’s in America.
1952: 15 million TV’s in America.
TV Booms in the 50’s
In the 1950’s several cigarette companies were sponsors of TV shows.
Example: “To Tell The Truth”
I’ve Got A Secret”.
Winston cigarettes advertised on “Gunsmoke” the longest running TV show in history.
1971:Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act (banned advertising on TV/radio).
TV’s link with Cigarettes
In the 1950’s companies actually owned TV shows.
Example:
Texaco Star Theatre (1948-1956).
Colgate Comedy Hour (1950-1955).
Direct influence on production and content.
TV in the 1950’s
1955:
57% of men smoked.
28% of women smoked.
Early 1950’s:
66% of all physicians smoked.
1950:
1st study linking smoking to lung cancer.
Cigarette Smoking in the 1950’s
The judgment about a persons intentions, personality, qualities without knowing them.
A simplified and standardized image held in common by a group.
Stereotype
Norm: A standard, model, or pattern. General level or average.
Example: Two cars per family is the norm for most suburban families.
“I Love Lucy”
Men: Hard working.
Women: Zany and submissive.
Children: Clean cut and obedient.
TV Code: “Highest standards of respect for the American home.” “Special Needs of Children.”
Television of the 1950’s
Men: Took classes in carpentry and auto.
Women: Took classes in typing, cooking, and etiquette.
Etiquette: Conventional requirements as to social behavior for any occasion.
1950’s High School Education
Children were clean-cut and obedient.
Average homemaker spent 3 hours cleaning, preparing meals, cooking, and feeding her family.
80% of Women were “happy homemakers”
Fathers were the center of the household.
TV Reinforcing Social Norms of the 1950’s
21% of men.
17% of women.

20% of the adult population.
Cigarette smoking now.
In 1950, 70% of men were in the work force.
Men were the breadwinners
Rules or standard of behavior shared by members of a social group.
Social Norms
The judgment about a persons intentions, personality, qualities without knowing them.
A simplified and standardized image held in common by a group.
What are some stereotypes that you know?
Full transcript