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Sustainability Trends of International Business Hotels

The trend of guest room development in deluxe international business hotels
by

Kathleen Briscoe

on 6 May 2010

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Transcript of Sustainability Trends of International Business Hotels

Introduction:
What is a deluxe international business hotel Hotel: common definition: an establishment that provides paid lodging on a short-term basis (wiki). Etymology: i.The word hotel is derived from the French hôtel (coming from hôte meaning host), which referred to a French version of a townhouse or any other building seeing frequent visitors, rather than a place offering accommodation. In contemporary French usage, hôtel now has the same meaning as the English term, and hôtel particulier is used for the old meaning. (Wiki)
Characteristics of Deluxe International Business Hotels Customer Service:
Highly personalized; not the same greeting and method of customer service is presented to every guest, but tailored to the individual needs and desires of the specific guest
Every guest is treated to the same caliber of service even if it is presented in a different manner
(example: suite selection) Very Professional Discreet and Confidential
High profile guests know they will be left alone; not harased or fussed over Amenities more variety
higher quality Image Not a common experience
Luxury office only few can afford Sustainability Trends of International Business Hotels Trends of guest room development for business hotels trends are greatly impacted by lifestyle trends of people Modern business culture: Lifestyle
1.“The guest room is no longer this fixed zone. It’s actually this fluid space that the guests are going to use as they want to.” Courtyard by Marriott, for instance, has added more public space because younger business travelers prefer that shared space to the guest room. “They’re happy to be working on their Blackberry or laptop in the public space,” Robson said. (What guests don’t want source) 2.“Generally, when guests are in the room they’re not looking to get excited about things. They’re generally there for relaxation purposes or they’re preparing something for a presentation. They like engaging in some kind of entertainment, but generally the guest room is supposed to be a relatively calming environment.” (What guests don’t want source) 3.“Control doesn’t mean offering more complexities for guests but giving them something they can master. Hotel operators need to keep in mind that guests may have had a trying experience just traveling to the property”. (What guests don’t want source) Guest rooms are the most important amenity in a hotel "It is essential that hoteliers continually reassess the purpose and function of their hotel guestrooms, the core product in a hotel. The physical aspects and tangible dimensions of the guestroom are keys to the satisfaction of the guest and a prime consideration for return patronage. It is proposed that the standard guestroom needs to be re-invented after its recognition of the five fundamental human senses – sight, olfactory, auditory, taste and tactile; the extra dimension of atmosphere, the so-called X-Factor, that encompasses the tangible physical factors of architecture, décor and furnishings (Nobles, 1999) should also be incorporated. (Guest Room Development Source) C. Hotel room designs should evolve with society not in response to society. Common issue
i.“Research showed that ‘sight’ was what hoteliers considered the dominant sense of guests, followed closely by ‘smell’. Contemporary guestrooms appear to be primarily pleasing to the eye and touch with no apparent consideration for smell despite being found to be the second most important determinant of the positive first and lasting impression for guests.” (Guest Room Development source)
Old trend vs. New trend
According to Levere (2003), business travelers are now increasingly using their hotel rooms for work as well as relaxation; therefore they spend more time in their rooms. Obata (2001) suggests that hotel rooms become the second homes for many business guests; thus these rooms should be warm, comfortable and inviting, and conducive for the conduct of business. The desire for a dedicated work area in the guestroom is not a recent one. (Guest Room Development Source)
“Negrusa & Ionescu (2005) explains that hotels are designed from the inside out, with emphasis on interior spaces and how the guest interacts with them and other guests”. Maybe the design should be underpinned by the five human senses encompassing all elements of presumption, be they tangible or intangible in nature. (Guest Room Development Source)
Décor and Furniture New common themes
“Flexibility is crucial to ensure accommodation of multiple uses,” Weaver says. Open, flexible seating options and distinctive décor lend a casual, open atmosphere for business events—while providing leisure travelers with lavish amenities and an intimate oasis”. (Guest Room Development Source)
Hospitality designers often invoke the words ‘residential’ and ‘homey’ in describing the intentions of their designs. But, let ’ s face it, hotels feel as much like our homes as their guest rooms feel like our own bedrooms. Indeed, there may be individuals who have floor safes in their closets, fully stocked mini-bars in their television cabinets, and clock radios bolted to their nightstands, but these people are the exceptions to the rule. Most of our homes do not resemble the hotels we choose to visit. This, after, all, is largely the reason we visit them. (Guest Room Development Source)
Focuses
“Wong (2001, online) asserts: ‘the bathroom is more important than the room itself’. This indicates the extent of the importance of the bathroom in contemporary hotel design”. (Guest Room Development Source)
“What the guest expects is an environment in which he or she is comfortable and where the entirety of human senses is stimulated in a positive way”. (Guest Room Development Source)
“Two-thirds of the respondents considered cleanliness, comfort and well-maintained rooms as one out of five factors important when either selecting a hotel for the first time or for repeat patronage (Weaver and Oh, 1993)”. (Guest Room Development Source)
iAn article in The Rooms Chronicle identified, in order of importance, four key points about cleanliness of hotel rooms: odour, visual cleanliness, shininess of bathroom and well-made-up bed. All the human senses come into play in gauging cleanliness: sight for visible soiling, smell for airborne particles, touch for surface dirt, taste and, to lesser extent, sound. (Guest Room Development Source)
“Generally, when guests are in the room they’re not looking to get excited about things. They’re generally there for relaxation purposes or they’re preparing something for a presentation. They like engaging in some kind of entertainment, but generally the guest room is supposed to be a relatively calming environment.” (What guests don’t want source)
“So here’s your guest arriving at your property. They’re stressed. They’re fatigued. They may be uncertain about how to find their way around your property. With that high stress level people’s need for control over their experience increases. So if you introduce a guest room with lots of bells and whistles and dials and stuff that you may think is really cool, remember your guest may not necessarily want that level of lack of control, at least early on.” (What guests don’t want source)
Examples Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino
1.“For the record, the rooms also are luxe: They feature oversized headboards covered in crushed velvet, leather or suede chairs, full-size desks with high-speed Internet and (since Starwood is now managing the resort) Sheraton's Sweet Sleeper beds, with pillow-top mattresses, feather down pillows, and high-thread-count sheets and duvets. The bathrooms offer plenty of marble, deep tubs, and separate shower stalls”. (Room Amenities and Trends Source)
Fabric-covered headboards
Plastic bed legs instead of frames and bed bases
Lighted bathroom makeup mirrors
Tissue holders, soap holders, water pitchers, flower vases and cotton-ball holders.
D.Technology within a room must interface with the guest’s portable technology. a. “I want my stuff to talk to your stuff,” as Balding put it.
He related a recent stay at a four and- a-half-star hotel in Boston and discovered no way to connect his iPod to the radio in his room. “There was not a phone jack, there wasn’t even a headphone jack. My expectation as a borderline Boomer was that should have been there.” (What guests don’t want source)
b. One smart card to make all your reservations and serve as hotel room key and everything in between. (What guests don’t want source) c. In-room safes large enough for laptop computers with charging capabilities inside the safe; * portable phones d.Television access to the Internet via wireless keyboards Nice to have’s Atlanta “Just like Home Theater Room” example: Home Theater Room will include a 50-inch flat-panel. High-definition plasma television, five surround-sound speakers with a 10-inch (25-cm) subwoofer, a DVD player and overstuffed leather chairs with individual cup holders for up to nine guests. The venue is designed for business travelers who might want to catch a game or relax by watching a movie but would prefer to do so in the company of co-workers or other guests. (Technology Trends) Robotic butlers, “botlers,” as he calls them, may be coming in the near future. “It can show you to your room, carry your luggage, and go get your room service,” he said. (What guests don’t want source) Suite Selection Example: MEMPHIS, TN— Hotel guest personalization is being taken to a new level by Hilton Hotels Corp. and its Homewood Suites by Hilton brand through a new initiative called Suite Selection. This will allow Homewood Suites' Hilton HHonors guests to select the exact suites they want to stay in prior to arrival.
Such a technological service is a first for the hotel industry, according to Homewood. Works Cited Customer Reviews of Hotel Experiences through Consumer Generated Media (CGM). Journal of
Hospitality Marketing & Management, 17(1/2), 121-138. Retrieved from Hospitality &
Tourism Complete database.
Gale, D., & Strauss, K. (2006). Getting The Picture. Hotels, 40(11), 67-70. Retrieved from
Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
Green, M. (2008). ROOM KEYS: What the guests at your hotel DON'T want.. International
Gaming & Wagering, 29(7), 22-24. Retrieved from Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
Hosford, C. (2008). The Stuff Dreams Are Made Of. Successful Meetings, 57(9), 49-56.
Retrieved from Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
Langmade, W. (2001). As The Amenities Bar Rises, Room Revenue Also Can Increase. Hotel &
Motel Management, 216(12), 26. Retrieved from Hospitality & Tourism Complete
database.
Ogle, A. (2009). Making sense of the hotel guestroom. Journal of Retail & Leisure Property,
8(3), 159-172. doi:10.1057/rlp.2009.7.
Ostrowski, C. (2007). Homewood enhances guest personalization with Suite Selection. Hotel Business,
16(2), 7-12. Retrieved from Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
Serlen, B. (2007). In-room entertainment is main focus of Hilton's new Sight + Sound Rooms.
Hotel Business, 168A. Retrieved from Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
Stoesssel, E., & Watkins, E. (2008). Need a guest-pleasing amenity? Find it here. Lodging
Hospitality, 64(6), 30-33. Retrieved from Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
Wynne-Jones, S. (2008). Tomorrow's World. Hospitality Ireland, (45), 88-90. Retrieved from
Hospitality & Tourism Complete database.
XIAO HAN, X., & COX, C. (2008). Hotel Selection Criteria and Satisfaction Levels of the
Chinese Business Traveler. Journal of China Tourism Research, 4(3/4), 261-281.
Planet Hollywood Room http://hilton.com/en/hw/promotions/floorplandemo/index.jhtml Scope: This presentation will cover the overall trends evident in today's hospitality industry that help insure economic sustainabil;ity for deluxe international business hotels. Specifically this presentation will focus on the modern global business culture of today and define what this market segmentation requires and expects when staying in a hotel for business purposes. Later this presentation will discuss the current trends in busioness hotels specifically pertaining to room amenities, decor, furnishing and technology. ThIs brief is designed to assist American hospitality companies in their plan for prospering during economic turmoil. This brief will not cover finances or leisure tourism, and anything below a deluxe level of hospitality.
Clientele is looking for the right host who will provide them with individualized customer service.

Business travelers need to know that they can perform their everyday office functions from their hotel.

The modern business culture wants to share spaces and they are “happy to be working on their Blackberry or laptops in a public space”

The extra dimension of atmosphere, the so-called X-Factor, that encompasses the tangible physical factors of architecture, décor and furnishings should also be incorporated.

The key to having the best first impression of a room is making sure each room is cleaned fully; making sure everything is nice, neat, and presentable.

Four key points about cleanliness of hotel rooms: odor, visual cleanliness, shininess of bathroom and a well-made-up bed are all judged by the human senses and come into play in gauging cleanliness: sight for visible soiling, smell for airborne particles, touch for surface dirt, taste and, to lesser extent, sound” (Gale, D., & Strauss, K. 2006)

The idea of a ‘residential’ and/or ‘homey’ design is considered ‘old fashioned’ and rooms should be better than guests’ private homes.

Element is doing their part to make sure that we as a global family reduce our carbon footprint They are doing this by recycling key cards and using environmental friendly amenities.

New customer relationship management (CRM) tools have made the check in process easier by speeding things up.

The televisions in today’s hotel rooms need to do a lot more than just play movies.

Hotels are using RFID and robotic butlers that would be able to show guests to their rooms, carry their bags, and deliver room service.
Key Learning Points:
Full transcript