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Fallacy: Question Begging Epithets

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by

McKenzie Blackwell

on 25 September 2013

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Transcript of Fallacy: Question Begging Epithets

Fallacy: Question Begging Epithets
Example
"This criminal is charged with violently murdering the innocent victim" vs. "This suspect is charged with killing the other person"
“Only a total moron would agree with your position! You and all your supporters are completely wacko!"
The Way out
Ask yourself the hard questions like “Is what I believe about this true?”
Be willing to really listen to people and see things from their position.
Research opposing viewpoints to yours and graciously admit when you’re wrong or when you need more information.
What is a fallacy?
a mistaking belief; misleading or unsound argument; faulty reasoning
Question begging Epithets
using biased or emotional language to convince people into accepting a position rather than using logic or evidence


Definition
the fallacy of merely assuming what one is trying to prove
arguer uses biased language to persuade people rather than using logic
user of the QBE puts their opinion on whatever it is they're talking about, qualifying it in a one-sided, biased manner
Problem
Strong language does not equal sound argument. This fallacy is usually committed when the opponent can’t find anything worthwhile to to say in return.
Example
“Only a total moron would agree with your position! You and all your supporters are completely wacko!"
“Your failure to be informed doesn’t make me a wacko!”
Full transcript