Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

JSA Summer School Georgetown 2010

No description
by

Nikki L

on 11 April 2010

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of JSA Summer School Georgetown 2010

Competition for Admissions in American Universities “Competition at the nation's colleges is intense and, some would say, out of control. The frenzy is fueled by a burgeoning population of high-school students competing for a fixed number of seats. One university dean says kids are so packaged these days that applicants – all with good grades, recommendations and extracurricular activities – tend to look the same.”
–Cathy Shaw Nation public radio
“There’s a sense of collective shock among parents at seeing extraordinarily talented kids getting rejected,” said Susan Gzesh, whose son Max Rothstein is a senior with an exemplary record at the Laboratory School, a private school associated with the University of Chicago. Max applied to 12 top schools and was accepted outright only by Wesleyan, New York University and the University of Michigan.” “The successful students have to have shown some passion for science and technology in high school or their personal life,” Ms. Perry said. “That means creating a computer system for your high school, or taking a tractor apart and putting it back together.” “The competition is ferocious not only at the top universities, but at selective small colleges, like Williams, Bowdoin and Amherst, all of which reported record numbers of applications. Amherst received 6,668 applications and accepted 1,167 students for its class of 2011, compared with the 4,491 applications and 1,030 acceptance letters it sent for the class of 2002 nine years ago, said Paul Statt, an Amherst spokesman.“Many of us who went to Amherst three decades ago know we couldn’t get in now; I know I couldn’t,” said Mr. Statt, who graduated from Amherst in 1978.”
–Sam Dillion, The New York Times
In his quest to capture a spot at a solid academic college, Andrew Lutz has done just about everything right at Pikesville High School. He has earned a nearly straight-A average, taking 10 Advanced Placement classes and wrapping up two years of calculus by the end of junior year. He worked on the school paper, played tennis year-round under the supervision of a private coach, and traveled to Ukraine for community service.
And yet, when Andrew looks around in his AP chemistry class, he sees himself as pretty ordinary. After all, he's not among the top three or four in his graduating class nor did he have a perfect or near-perfect score on the SAT exams, as did two of the eight students.
Despite his work inside the classroom, Andrew had yet to nail the SAT. After a sleepless night, he took the three-part test and was surprised to learn he had scored a perfect 800 in math and 600s in writing and reading. He celebrated the 800, but knew he had to get at least 700s on the other sections to be competitive. His parents got him an English tutor for six weeks. He made it on the next try, and into Tufts University 2 weeks later.
Nataniel Mandelberg, a friend, had gotten a perfect 2400 on his three SATs, a rare feat. The curly-headed boy with the perfect A average wanted to go to a selective University. He worked in a Johns Hopkins lab after school, and led several student lead organizations all four years of his high school career. Nearly a week after Andrew’s acceptance, Nataniel received troubling news, he had been rejected or deferred from all but 2 of his applied to schools. Andrew was incredulous. "Maybe they had some rock star who was really smart. Maybe they had some kid who invented Crocs ... helped cure something in Africa. It’s not a joke. That happens now-a-days" he said. –Liz Bowie, the Baltimore Sun
“When is B a failing grade? The answer is now. In the senior class at Oakland Mills High School in Columbia, for example, a girl with a 3.9 grade point average was wait-listed at Johns Hopkins University and a boy with a 3.6 grade point average was accepted at Syracuse University but put on a waiting list at the University of Maryland. High school counselors say credentials that would have assured a student's admission to an institution in the past often didn't cut it this spring.”
-Barbara Vobejda, The Washington Post
Colleges are looking for students who have a defining interest and the willingness to follow that interest, as evidenced by how a student spends his time. This policy actually makes a great deal of sense, when you consider the required tenacity and interest in achieving a college degree. While many well rounded students may flounder in choosing a major or even area of interest, focused students already have an interest they would like the college to help develop. If your child is interested in being a committed musician, for example, there are all state competitions, private lessons, summer programs and advanced bands to consider. Many teachers stay connected to the field in which they teach, consider contacting them for advice. –Lifestyle Mag. Nat King Cole once sang about the "lazy, hazy, crazy days of summer," but for high school students deciding which college they want to attend, and even middle schoolers, this is hardly an idle time of year. Competition for admissions to nearly any four year University in current times requires a productive vacation and shown growth between grades.
Tuition costs vary among the summer programs Choate offers. For the high school program, they top out at $5,100 for boarding students. For day students, the costs are $1,450 per course in the students’ major and $790 per minor course.
Educators say there is an increasing pressure on teens to use their summer breaks to maximize their ability to get into the college of their choice.
"I’m not defending it or saying it’s a good thing, but it is the way of the world," said Steven Roy Goodman, a Washington, D.C.-based consultant. Goodman has spent the past 18 years working with families trying to help their high school-age children get into college.
"The pressure is everywhere," he said. "It’s almost a prerequisite to do something in the summer that will build your college resume if you want to get into a good school."
It isn’t just elite private educational institutions that are becoming harder to get into, Goodman said. Public colleges such as the University of Connecticut have raised their standards dramatically.
"Students are getting shut out of quality state schools," Goodman said.
Dolan Evanovich, a vice provost for enrollment management at UConn, acknowledges that the school’s admission standards have become more selective over the past 10 years, and believes summer courses are a good thing.
"Good students are always doing what it takes to make themselves better prepared for the challenges they face in college," he said. -Luther Turmelle, New Haven Register
Summer Rejected JSA
Julia Hernandez is a college consultant. She currently has 80 clients. And yet, unlike Cohen of IvyWise, who now has a staff of 15 providing help with applications for nursery school on up, Hernandez is still on her own,
Hernandez and Mimi Doe announced their first application boot camp. It was a $7,800, four-day summer program for students about to enter their senior year. Doe and Hernandez promised they would leave with completed applications and a strategy for where to seek admission.

All 15 spaces for the New York seminar, held at the luxury Kitano hotel, were snapped up in weeks. In the summers of 2006 and 2007, Hernandez and Doe raised the price, first to $8,200 and then to $9,500, and still filled one session in Manhattan and another at the Shutters Hotel in Santa Monica. Next year they will charge $12,500.

Certainly, plenty of kids delight in the opportunities consultants like Hernandez make available to them.

Set aside for the moment the concerns of the affluent, though. There is another fear about expensive counselors such as Hernandez: that they help distort an educational system that can already leave the less privileged at a disadvantage.

Hernandez, meanwhile, is finding new ways to extend her brand. She and Doe have created a virtual boot camp ($2,999). They have put together a 60-page book, Set Yourself Apart: The Ultimate Guide to Top High School Summer Programs ($189). They have a partnership with two SAT tutors who on Hernandez' Web site offer five hours of help over the phone ($1,600). And Hernandez and Doe are hoping to link up with a travel consultant, someone who could plan family trips to visit colleges.
Elite universities look favorably on students who participate in academic programs such as ours during their summers. Our experience is that a high percentage of our students are accepted into very prestigious schools. Students who are attractive to top schools are also the students seeking out programs like the Junior Statesmen Summer School Summer may seem far off, but its not too early to start thinking ahead. As everyone knows, summer programs are now an imperative element in gaining admission... "Part of the program is now focused specifically on leadership and public service," explains Jeff Harris, executive director for Junior Statesmen. "[Students will] walk away with the skills and knowledge to be leaders in their schools and community - and with a bunch of new friends. Mostly they'll walk away with a better sense of the political landscape and what it takes to make a difference." International Relations
Constitutional Law
Speech/Political Communications
AP United States Government "meet and question national leaders, including white house officials, congressional leaders, cabinet members, lobbyist and journalists. Students watch the House and Senate sessions, attend congressional hearings and use the vast resources of Washington while doing research for their term paper and debates." Highschool and Collegiate credited courses I did this last summer at Princeton and would go back in a heartbeat. I took Gov and my professor was actually a teacher at Princeton and he was AMAZING. Best teacher I've ever had, hands down. So class wise, I had really good experiences.
I'm not going to lie, it was a LOT of work. I think our gov teacher was a little more intense than some of the others but all the same, classes basically consumed every spare minute of time there. Still, I loved it. I met some great people and I learned really valuable life skills that made dealing with a heavy work load as a junior this year much easier. I see a lot of my friends struggling to balance all their AP classes but I learned how to do that last summer. After JSA at Princeton, I feel like I can take on any amount of work, lol.
As for the cost, I applied for financial aid so that got me some money so in the end, the total cost wasn't overwhelming. But seriously, DO IT. I highly reccomend the program. If you're truly passionate about politics, you'll have an amazing summer."
-JSA Georgetown alumni

Today, Hernandez has 80 clients. And yet, unlike Cohen of IvyWise, who now has a staff of 15 providing help with applications for nursery school on up, Hernandez is still on her own,
Hernandez and Mimi Doe announced their first application boot camp. It was a $7,800, four-day summer program for students about to enter their senior year. Doe and Hernandez promised they would leave with completed applications and a strategy for where to seek admission.

All 15 spaces for the New York seminar, held at the luxury Kitano hotel, were snapped up in weeks. In the summers of 2006 and 2007, Hernandez and Doe raised the price, first to $8,200 and then to $9,500, and still filled one session in Manhattan and another at the Shutters Hotel in Santa Monica. Next year they will charge $12,500.

Certainly, plenty of kids delight in the opportunities consultants like Hernandez make available to them.

Set aside for the moment the concerns of the affluent, though. There is another fear about expensive counselors such as Hernandez: that they help distort an educational system that can already leave the less privileged at a disadvantage.

Hernandez, meanwhile, is finding new ways to extend her brand. She and Doe have created a virtual boot camp ($2,999). They have put together a 60-page book, Set Yourself Apart: The Ultimate Guide to Top High School Summer Programs ($189). They have a partnership with two SAT tutors who on Hernandez' Web site offer five hours of help over the phone ($1,600). And Hernandez and Doe are hoping to link up with a travel consultant, someone who could plan family trips to visit colleges.
Full transcript