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Copy of Holocaust Prezi

Overview & description of the Holocaust, includes images and a timeline. Created for 10th grade World History. This prezi may not be appropriate for younger ages unless edited.
by

Lacey Heinz

on 11 April 2014

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Transcript of Copy of Holocaust Prezi

The Holocaust
Definition of Genocide
United Nations- December 9, 1948
Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide

Genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:
(a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.
Beginnings of
Nazi Ideology

1925- Mein Kampf (My Struggles) is Published
Hitler refers to the Germans as the superior "Aryan" race
Jews were the scapegoats/ blamed for all of Germany's problem
1933- Hitler becomes Chancellor
First Concentration Camp built- Dachau, Germany
Anti-Semitic views of the Nazi party
Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service
Eugenics Begins
Law for the Prevention of Offspring with Hereditary Diseases
Progression
of Oppression

1. The Nuremburg Laws (1935)
2. Kristallnacht (1938)
“The Night of Broken Glass”
3. Identification (1939)
The Ghettos
Lodz Ghetto (1940)
160,000 people
Warsaw Ghetto (1940)
350,000 people
The Concentration Camps
The Final Solution (1941)
First tests of Zyklon
Gassing operations begin at Chelmno in mobile vans
Wanasee Conference (1942)
Plans for Final Solution solidified
The Efficiency of Death
Travel By Train, Selection upon Arrival
Gas Chambers
Disguised as Showers
Stains from Zyklon B
Devastation
Belzec Killing Center (March-December 1942)
600,000 people are killed

Auschwitz-Birkenau (1942-1945)
1 million + people are killed
9/10 were Jews

Treblinka Killing Center (July 1942 – Nov 1943)
750,000 Jews
2,000 Gypsies

It is estimated that more than 6 million Jews and approx 5 million other non-combatants were killed by the Nazi government
Liberation
January 1945
Soviet troops liberate 8,000 prisoners from Auschwitz
April 1945
US troops liberate 20,000 prisoners at Buchenwald
US troops liberate approx 32,000 prisoners at Dachau
Human Rights Web. United Nations, Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. http://www.hrweb.org/legal/genocide.html

US Holocaust Memorial Museum. Resources and Materials. http://www.ushmm.org/education/foreducators/resource/

US Holocaust Memorial Museum. Collections and Archives. http://www.ushmm.org/research/collections/

www.ushmm.org/propaganda

www.remember.org/auschwitz

www.ushmm.org/museum/exhibit/online/stlouis

www.scholocaustcouncil.org

www.schaefshouse.com

SOURCES
The Holocaust was the state-sponsored, systematic persecution and annihilation of European Jewry by Nazi Germany and its collaborators between 1933 and 1945. Jews were the primary victims- Gypsies, the handicapped, and Poles were also targeted for destruction or decimation for racial, ethnic, or national reasons. Millions more, including homosexuals, Jehovah's Witnesses, Soviet prisoners of war and political dissidents, also suffered grievous oppression and death under Nazi tyranny.

using the form rank the books first (1) to last (4)
"Milkweed" by Jerry Spinelli (Fiction)

He has no home, no family, no food, and survives by not getting caught. He is a Jew. He lives with a band of boys who steal to stay alive and do their best to go unoticed. In Warsaw, Poland in 1939 the best thing to do is to be invisible.


Mass Deportations
from Ghettos (1942)
"Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl" by Anne Frank (Nonfiction)

In this true story a young Jewish girl documents her two years in hiding, her first love, and her secrets.
"Parallel Journeys" by Eleanor Ayer with Helen Waterford and Alfons Heck (Nonfiction)

A true story of a young boy growing up in Nazi Germany, and a young Jewish girl, also living in Nazi Germany. Alfons rose in leadership in the Hitler Youth while Helen's family fled to Holland to escape persecution.
"The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak (Fiction)

It is 1939. Nazi Germany. The country is holding its breath. Death has never been busier, and will become busier still.

Liesel, a foster girl living outside of Munich, finds refuge when she encounters something she can’t resist–books.
Anti-Semitism
Coined in 1879 in Germany in an attempt to define anti-Jewish sentiment on a scientific basis. Unlike the traditional religiously, and emotionally based hatred of Jews, anti-semitism was to justify the rejection of Jews as a different people, nation, and race that threatens the mere existence of the national unity and the national state. Today the term refers to the prejudice or discrimination against Jews, based on their religious/ and or on group stereotypes.

READ THE SUMMARY OF ANTISEMITISM
In what way did Nazi ideology create a new form of antisemitism?
Can you name groups of people in the USA who have been unfairly blamed?



Nazi Propaganda
PYRAMID OF HATE
How does propaganda work?
Repeats the same information over and over
Twists and exploits the truth
Appeals to people's emotions
Gives the illusion that people agree with the message
Talks to people in the own language

What is the effect of the Propaganda that you see here?

ACTIVITY: LOOK AT 3 EXAMPLES OF NAZI PROPAGANDA (SET ON TABLE) AND ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS INDEPENDENTLY ON A SHEET OF PAPER. BE READY TO DISCUSS.

* What statement is this photo making?
*How is it attempting to further isolate Jews from the rest of the population?
*Which of the propaganda methods (above) apply to this photo?

1. LOOK UP THE WORD "Holocaust" IN THE DICTIONARY.


2. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT THAT WE STUDY THE HOLOCAUST? GENERATE A LIST OF AT LEAST 5 GOOD REASONS TO SHARE WITH THE CLASS.
THINK ABOUT IT...
WAS ANTISEMITISM ONLY A PROBLEM OF THE PAST OR DOES IT REMAIN TODAY?
Read "Not in Our Town" and be ready to discuss.
In a small group, design a poster in keeping with the "Not in Our Town" campaign.
1.
2.
3.
1.
2
.
3.
4.
What rights do you value most?

Nuremberg Laws on Citizenship and Race"
Consisted of 17 Articles defined who is a Jew
A full Jew is anyone with three Jewish Grandparents
First Class Mischlinge- two Jewish Grandparents but did not practice Judiasm or have a Jewish spouse
Second Class Mischlinge- one Jewish Grandparent

Seven documents were required to prove German descent
Your birth or baptismal certificate, certificates for both parents, and certificates for all four grandparents.
On November 9, 1938, Nazi troops, along with mobs of civilians, attacked Jewish homes, synagogues, and businesses. 100 Jews were killed.

ACTIVITY:
1. In your literature groups, use the laptops to explore this event further. You will need to complete the outline provided. Is this event in your book? The following ( http://www.ushmm.org/information/exhibitions/online-features/special-focus/kristallnacht )

2. Next, take the information and present it to the class in the form of a skit as if you are reporting on the event and interviewing an eye witness.


ARTIFACTS:

PASSPORT

BADGES
Yellow stars were used by the Nazi to identify Jews in France, Belgium, Holland, Germany, Alsace, Bohemia, Slovakia, Hungary, Greece, Lithuania, Latvia and Romania
Notice the red "J" which was printed on all German Jewish passports. A law passed in Germany 1939 required all men to take the middle name "Israel" and all Jewish woman must take the middle name "Sara."
A section of a city where all Jews from the surrounding areas were forced to live. What was the purpose of these ghettos?
VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST
YOU WILL EACH BE GIVEN A PROFILE OF A ACTUAL PERSON WHO EXPERIENCED THE HOLOCAUST. NOTE THAT THEIR PROFILE IS CUT SHORT AND DOES NOT TELL OF THEIR FATE. YOU WILL FOLLOW THIS PERSON THROUGHOUT THE REMAINING UNIT.

READ YOUR PRFILE. BASED ON WHAT YOU KNOW AND HAVE LEARNED YOU WILL WRITE ENTRIES FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF YOUR HOLOCAUST PROFILE PERSON.


VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST
JEWS WERE NOT THE ONLY VICTIMS OF THE HOLOCAUST. IN YOUR SMALL GROUPS YOU WILL READ ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE WHO WERE PERSECUTED BY THE NAZI PARTY

BE READY TO SUMMARIZE AND PRESENT YOUR FINDINGS TO THE CLASS
AS WE WATCH THE VIDEO TAKE NOTES ON THE TIMELINE HANDOUNT

ARTIFACT ACTIVITY:

You will work in teams (2 or 3). Each team will receive an everyday object poster and will preform the following tasks:

1. read the poster, noting every place referred to in the text (towns, cities, countries, and camps)
2. using the outline map, locate/ label the places on your list
3. finally, create a key for your map to identifycamps/ ghettos

YOU HAVE ACCESS TO MAPS IN TRUNK/ LAPTOPS!
When you are done we will reconvene to share.
WHAT ITEM WOULD YOU CHOOSE THAT WOULD TELL FUTURE GENERATIONS ABOUT YOUR LIFE?

CONCENTRATION VS. DEATH CAMPS

experiences and statistics
1. Read the 2 personal accounts of people in camps in your small groups.

2. Make a chart of an assigned camp: include the following information
location
date established
number of prisoners killed
number of Jews killed
date liberated
number of survivors
Obstacles to resistance?
Different types of resistance (spiritual, physical)
Where resistance took place (ghettos and camps, Nazi Germany)
How different people resisted the Nazis

RESCUE AND RESISTANCE
ACTIVITY: RESISTANCE RESEARCH
You will explore a topic related to resistance during the Holocaust and individuals who resisted. You will then have the opportunity to present their findings to the class. See instructions on the handout. You may choose topics, and spend the rest of class working on the project with classroom resources. WORLD BOOK.
Brainstorm ways people can resist those in authority...
RESCUE AND RESISTANCE


There were those
who escaped to the forests
who crawled through the sewers
who jumped from the back of trains

There were those
who smuggled messages
who smuggled dynamite
inside breadloves
inside matchboxes
inside corpses

There were those
who were shoemakers
who put nails
into the boots
of German soldiers

There were those
who wrote poetry
who put on plays
who taught the children

There were those
who fed each other

--Susan Dambroff

STEP #1
STEP #2
STEP #3
STEP #4

RESCUE AND RESISTANCE
1. The Evian Conference


2. Danish Rescue Boat


3. Father Maximilian Kolbe

RESCUER'S TESTIMONY
How and why was the reaction of Danes different from that of other countries?
Describe Father Kolbe's work before he was imprisoned. In what ways did Father Kolbe resist or rescue others?
PRAYER TO SAINT MAXIMILIAN KOLBE
Dear Saint Maximilian Mary Koble,
you were destined from youth for the religigious life. You founded the "militia" that worked to spread the devotion to our Blessed Mother's Immaculate Hear. During World War II, you were captured in Poland by the German army and later transferred to Auschwitz. While others were chosen to be executed, you, who had not been chosen, offered yourself in another man's place. We honor your martyrdom and your faith to carry out the Gospel of Christ to lay down your life for your friend.
1. Why do you think Mr. Wiesel left his prepared speech to ask President Clinton to do something
about Bosnia?

2. Do you think that Eli Wiesel was correct in using this forum for addressing this problem?

3. Why was Elie Wiesel able to do this?

4. Did Eli Wiesel's remarks make a difference?
DIRECTIONS: READ ELIE WIESEL'S REMARKS AT THE OPENING OF THE HOLOCAUST MUSEUM
THNINK ABOUT IT!
LEON BASS REMARKS
Leon Bass
Bass was a soldier in the US Army during WWII and a liberator of Buchenwald.
1. What does Bass say is the way to avoid another genocide?
2. How can we, as individuals, make a difference?
3. Why is learning about the Holocaust important for the youth of the world?
THE HATE STOPS HERE!
REFLECTION JOURNAL:
As you listen to the song, think about how you are called to change the world.
Full transcript