Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Typography for Design

The art of type design
by

Brendan McCann

on 28 July 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Typography for Design

From Typical
to Terrific
Handglovery
This is called the
CROSSBAR
This is called the
BRACKET
This is called the
STEM
This is called the
BASELINE
This is called the
TERMINAL
This is called the
COUNTER
The part of a letter that is enclosed
These are called
ASCENDERS
The parts of letters that ascend from the x-height
and stop at the cap height.
This is called the
EAR
This is called the
LINK/NECK
This is called the
LOOP/LOBE
This is called the
AXIS
This is called the
BOWL
This is called the
OVERSHOOT
This is called the
EYE
This is called the
FINAL
This is called the
SHOULDER
These are called the
SERIFS
This is called the
TAIL
This is called the
DESCENDER
The parts of letters that descend
from the baseline.
This is called the
CAP HEIGHT
This is called the
X-HEIGHT
Designing with type
Anatomy
Typography - The art or practice of setting and arranging type.
Leading - In typography, leading (rhymes with heading) refers to the amount of added vertical spacing between lines of type.
Kerning - Kerning refers to the horizontal space between individual pairs of letters (a kerning pair). Fonts that are properly kerned appear evenly spaced without large open gaps of white space between characters.
x-height - Vertical height of a lowercase x in a typeface. X height varies from one typeface to another. Also called body height.
Serif - In typography, serifs are semi-structural details on the ends of some of the strokes that make up letters and symbols.
Sans Serif - In typography, a sans-serif or sans serif typeface is one that does not have the small features called "serifs" at the end of strokes.
Point Size - The size of a typeface, measured in points. The size refers to the height of the letters. There are 72 points in an inch.
Italic - a version of a typeface that is slanted and script-like
Font Family- In typography, a typeface is a set of one or more fonts, in one or more sizes, designed with stylistic unity, each comprising a coordinated set of glyphs.
Ascender - The stem of a lowercase letter projecting above the x-height.
Descender - The stem of a lowercase letter projecting below the x-height.
Typography
of
(rhymes with heading) refers to the amount of vertical spacing between baselines of type.
Refers to the horizontal spacing between individual pairs of letters.
The size of a typeface, measured in points. The size refers to the height of the letters. There are 72 points in an inch.
typeface is one that does not have the small features called "serifs" at the end of strokes.
Serifs are semi-structural details on the ends of some of the strokes that make up letters and symbols.
Vertical height of a lowercase x in a typeface. X-height varies from one typeface to another. Also called body height.
Kerning
Leading
x-height
Serif Font
Sans Serif Font
point size
The bottom line that a font rests on. Leading is determined from the baseline.
baseline
Refers to the
o v e r a l l
spacing between letters of a word or line of text.
Tracking
- Paul Rand (typography master)
"Don't try to be original,
just try to be good"
10
Good
Guidelines
TYPOGRAPHY
Bad Typography.
Good Typography
Mistake #1
Mistake #2
Mistake #3
Full transcript