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Bridges and Tunnels of Metro Vancouver

The history of some of the bridges and tunnels of Metro Vancouver
by

cool lids

on 5 April 2013

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Transcript of Bridges and Tunnels of Metro Vancouver

Bridges and Tunnels of
Metro Vancouver By James Yu Hello and welcome to another one of my Prezis. This
Prezi is about bridges and tunnels of Metro Vancouver. My inquiry question is: What is the the history of some of the bridges and tunnels of Metro Vancouver? Enjoy! This is the Capilano Suspension Bridge. It is in North Vancouver. It was originally built in 1889 using ropes and cedar planks. In 1956, it was rebuilt with metal cables. Currently, it is 137 meters long and 70 meters deep. In 2012, a new attraction called the Cliffwalk was added. Next is the George Massey Tunnel. It opened in 1959 and had a retrofit in 2004. It connects Richmond to Delta. It is 629 meters long and 22 meters below sea level. There are no people allowed to walk in the tunnel. I heard in the news that it is planned to be replaced. It needs replacing because it is over capacity. It might be turned into a bridge. Here is the Arthur Laing Bridge. It is a cantilever bridge built in May 1976. It connects Vancouver to Sea Island. Its length is 167 meters and its width is 20 meters. The 98 B-line, connecting Richmond to Vancouver, used to operate over this bridge along with 2 other buses. These are the North and Middle Arm bridges. Both of these bridges belong to the Canada Line. The North Arm bridge connects Richmond to Vancouver. It is a suspension bridge that has pedestrian access, is 47 meters high, and is 562 meters long. The Middle Arm bridge connects Richmond to Sea Island. However, it doesn't have pedestrian access. It is a box girder bridge. A box girder bridge is a bridge that has a girder that makes a tube. Dimensions are unknown. Both of these bridges opened August 2009. This next bridge (and tunnel) is on the Trans-Canada Highway. The pictures don't show it, but they are either of the ends of the tunnel. The bridge, named Ironworkers Memorial Bridge, or Second Narrows Bridge, comes just after the North end of the tunnel. The tunnel, built in 1992, used to be just a traffic light. The bridge is named after 19 people who died following a collapse during construction. Up next are the Sea Island and Moray Bridges. The Sea Island bridge is on Bridgeport Road. It goes towards Sea Island, possibly why it is called Sea Island bridge. It opened 2002,a few decades after the Moray bridge opened. The Moray bridge, built in 1957, carries traffic from Sea Island onto Sea Island Way. It is a swing bridge with a span of 58 meters. Originally, it carried two way traffic. A swing bridge is a bridge that swings to let boats pass through. Next is the Granville Street bridge. It is located in Downtown Vancouver. It was built in 1889, and had a retrofit in 1909 and again in 1954. It is 27.4 meters high, and is part of Highway 99. Here is the Burrard bridge. It is also located in Downtown Vancouver, but it's closer to the west. It opened in 1932. It is a box girder bridge. Dimensions are unknown for this bridge. They have made a bike lane on it 2 years ago. Here is the Cambie bridge. It is a box girder bridge that is 1100 meters long. It was orig Here is the Cambie bridge. It is a box girder bridge that was originally built in 1891. It had a rebuild in 1911 and in 1985. It is 1100 meters long and is part of Cambie Street. Next to the image is a time lapse of False Creek. Up next is the Lions Gate bridge. It is also known as the First Narrows bridge, and is part of Highway 99. It is 4283 meters long, 111 meters high, and is a suspension bridge. It opened in 1938, and is in West Vancouver. This is the Oak Street bridge. It is located in Richmond. It was opened in 1957, and is part of Highway 99, just like the Lions Gate bridge and the Granville Street bridge. Dimensions are unknown. Up next is the Knight Street bridge. It is located in Richmond and Vancouver, while crossing another island. It is a box girder bridge that was opened in 1974. Its length is 1436 meters. Here is the Golden Ears bridge. It is an extradosed bridge that was opened in 2009. An extradosed bridge is a bridge that is a cross between a girder bridge and a cable-stayed bridge. The bridge replaced the Alboin Ferry, and the bridge is 976 meters long. There are tolls on this bridge. And finally, the widest bridge in the world (10 lanes), the Port Mann bridge. The new bridge was opened September 18th, 2012 and the old one was opened June 12th, 1964. The old bridge was an arch bridge that was 2093 meters long. The new bridge is a cable-stayed bridge that is 2020 meters long, 65 meters wide, and 163 meters high. Problems with the new bridge is that ice balls formed on the cables. But mini cleaners were installed. Another problem was the de-icing.

(Old bridge on left. New bridge on right.) Well, that's it. I hope you enjoyed this prezi and liked my others too! The End The Massey tunnel replacement options are:
Upgrade the current tunnel
Make a new bridge
Make a new tunnel
Keep the tunnel, and build a new bridge or tunnel
Keep the tunnel, and build a new bridge or tunnel someplace else, such as East Richmond.
They are currently in the process of thinking about the options.
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