Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

New Journalism

No description
by

Greg Pappagelis

on 5 May 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of New Journalism

New Journalism By Greg Pappagelis Counterculture in the 1960's and 1970's spawned many new beliefs, ideas, and ways of life. The wide spread deviance from mainstream culture and society created a clear difference from the old, and the new. Writers and journalists at the time thought that traditional journalism was insufficient at portraying what was really going on. These journalists wanted to report broad social and cultural movements of their time. My purpose for writing this paper is to reveal how new journalism is a product of cultural and social movements of counterculture generation. Introduction How it formed from 60's era counterculture What is New Journalism?

The counterculture movement
Rebellion-Sale and use of illegal drugs
Challenge of Authority "Big Brother" "The Man"
Radical desire for change
-Thought mainstream society was
flawed, they wanted to replace it with their version of an utopian society. Key Figures of New Journalism Findings: TOM WOLFE -Put a name on the writing movement
with the release of Electric Kool-Aid Acid test How did Tom represent a generation? He wrote about the merry pranksters, a traveling group of hippies that drove across the nation while on various types of drugs, searching for their utopian dream.
Wolfe saw the beginning of the hippie movement, things were moving froward for the counter culture movement The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test is regarded as an accurate and essential book depicting the roots and growth of the hippie movement (132) -1968 Hunter S. Thompson A true New Journalists, that refined
genre is his own unique way. With the release of Fear and Loathing Thompson had created "GONZO" journalism.
Gonzo journalism is easily described as reporting in a constant drug fueled stream of consciousness, where facts don't matter. Relation to Counterculture Relation to counterculture Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream (1972), Joan Didion Scura, Conversations With Tom Wolfe Bredahl, "An Exploration of Power: Tom Wolfe's Acid Test Hunter S. Thompson. (2013). In Encyclopedia Britannica Hunter became a counter culture icon because of his unique writing style. Thompson’s depictions and social commentary on the Las Vegas lifestyle show that the U.S. was suffering from a lack of hope that the youth of the 1960s had once promised. Hunter saw the image of the hippie collapse; the incident at Altamont music festival left 5 people dead (including and 18 year old) and the murder of Sharon Tate and Leno & Rosemary LaBianca by Charles Manson and his "hippie" followers.. Hartsock, John C. A History of American Literary Journalism: The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2000 JeromeKlinkowitz. The American 1960s: Imaginative Acts in a Decade of Change. (Ames: The Iowa University State Press, 1980), 71. Weingarten. The Gang That Wouldn't Write Straight Weingarten. The Gang That Wouldn’t Write Straight Slouching Towards Bethlehem A collection of essays that chronicle
Didion's experiences of the Height-Ashbury
district of San Francisco. Didion clearly separated herself from
previous writers on the subject.
She saw the destruction of a generation
during her time in Height-Ashbury. Her
interactions with the hippies led her to
believe that all of the hope that Tome Wolfe
installed in the Hippie generation was lost
and forgotten. Sloughing Towards Bethlehem
is a collection of the injustices she encountered. New Journalism is a product of narrative story telling and factual reporting. New journalists wanted to completely separate themselves from traditional journalists. New journalists are often placed within in the counterculture movement. WOLFE


Didon


THOMPSON How Literary Journalism spawned from the counterculture movement 1968 1968 1971 Didion, Joan. Slouching Toward Bethlehem. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1968. Hartsock, John C. A History of American Literary Journalism: The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2000. Sims, Norman. Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990. Thompson, Hunter S. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream. New York: Random House, 1971. Wolfe, Tom. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. New York: Bantam Books, 1968. Spates, James. Levin, Jack. (1972) International Social Science journal, vol 24. sec2. Beast, hippies, the hip generation, and the American middle class: an analysis of values. Relation to counterculture
She saw the reality their movement Hinckley, David (October 15, 1998). "Groovy The Summer Of Love, 1967". New York Daily News. Retrieved September 28, 201 Dangerous drug use.
"Five years old" Otto said "On Acid"
Hopeless pursuit of a new utopia
Inhibited because of their way of life A would-be utopia that transforms into a dystopian
nightmare Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test Journalism Narrative Writing Wolfe traveled side by side with the
Merry pranksters and their leader, well known counter culture figure Ken Kesey. Wolfe recorded many different experiences with the group. Wolfe captures the essence of the
pranksters, he makes the stories so entertaining
that readers looked at his work a a narrative
instead of an news report Didon observed the hippie movement in San Francisco, Hash bury distract, the mecca of hippies at the time. She recorded the interactions she had with the hippies in San Francisco. Journalism Journalism Narrative Writing Narrative Writing Slouching Towards Bethlehem Fear and Loathing "Boundaries of the form include; immersion, structure, accuracy, voice, responsibility, and underlining meaning or symbolism" (Sims, 1990) She interpreted the events
she saw, her piece depicted
the hippie movement as a
lost hope Thompson added his personal
life to his writing, his extreme social
deviation adds to the books charisma
and lasting impression. Thompson had collected all his experiences
in Las Vegas, he was originally hired by sports
illustrated to report on the Mint 400 a motorcycle
race that spans across the desert. Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1968. p. xiii. Tom Wolfe. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. New York: Bantam Books, 1968. Conclusion
The mass rebellion of the counterculture movement brought a new generation into american culture. Hippies in the counterculture movement desired radical change, an unrealistic hunt for a perfect utopia. The movement was captured by the mainstream and underground media. The underground or "New Journalists" provided a deeper step into the movement, they captured the rise, decline, and fall of the counterculture movement. This style of journalism is a product of the counterculture movement, journalists were inspired by the changing times much like the hippies themselves. Though the hippie movement has failed, the works of those who have recorded it, has not. These pieces allow for anyone to peek into what into the counterculture movement, through the stories of; Wolfe, Didion, and Thompson. Sources Hinckley, David (October 15, 1998). "Groovy The Summer Of Love, 1967". New York Daily News. Retrieved September 28, 201 Weingarten. The Gang That Wouldn’t Write Straight Spates, James. Levin, Jack. (1972) International Social Science journal, vol 24. sec2. Beast, hippies, the hip generation, and the American middle class: an analysis of values. Hartsock, John C. A History of American Literary Journalism: The Emergence of a Modern Narrative Form. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2000.

Sims, Norman. Literary Journalism in the Twentieth Century. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.

Thompson, Hunter S. Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas: A Savage Journey to the Heart of the American Dream. New York: Random House, 1971.

Joan Didion, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1968. p. xiii.

Tom Wolfe. The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test. New York: Bantam Books, 1968. JeromeKlinkowitz. The American 1960s: Imaginative Acts in a Decade of Change. (Ames: The Iowa University State Press, 1980), 71. Hunter S. Thompson. (2013). In Encyclopedia Britannica Hinckley, David (October 15, 1998). "Groovy The Summer Of Love, 1967". New York Daily News. Retrieved September 28, 201
Full transcript