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Jewish Immigration to Canada

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Blanche Pagobo

on 23 January 2015

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Transcript of Jewish Immigration to Canada

All about the Jews
Push and Pull Factors
First Arrival
Life in Canada
Introduction
Challenges & Successes:
Contributions And Impact
Conclusion
Before Immigration
The Journey to Canada
Jewish Immigration to Canada
Push Factors:
They wanted to escape
religious persecution, revolution and
the social & economic changes brought about by industrialization.
Pull Factors:
Canada had political/religious and
social refuge. The Jews also wanted
to work as farmers.
Jews have migrated to Canada since
the 18nth century. The first wave of
Jews came from Germany while the
second wave came from the Pale of
Settlement, a region in Eastern Europe and Russia.
The Jews had a rough life back
home. They were being discriminated and they were violently persecuted. There were even programs in Eastern Europe directed against Russian, Polish and Romanian Jews.They Jews also were not allowed to run for public office.
From 1850 to 1900 Jewish immigrants came mostly from Europe(8). During this period approximately 15,000 Jewish immigrants arrived in Canada. The Shumiatcher family, when they came to Canada in 1909, were part of a wave of 120,000 Jews that came from Eastern Europe between 1900 and 1920.
Jewish Immigrants brought a tradition of establishing a communal body, called a kehilla to look after the social welfare needs of the less fortunate jews in Canada because most of the Jewish Refugees were very poor. Most of the immigrants established communities in the larger cities. There was a community of about 100 that settled in Victoria, B.C. to open shops to prospectors during the Caribou Gold Rush. In the late 1800s and early 1900s fifteen Jewish farm colonies were established on the Canadian Prairies.
Most of these Jewish settlers emigrated from the United States and settled in urban centers, the majority in Montreal. The 1831 census recorded 197 Jewish residents in Upper and Lower Canada. By 1851 the number had increased to 451. Most were middle class and well educated; they were involved in trade and contributed to the economic growth of the country.
Most of the refugees were very poor but then they received help from the Kehilla which made their lives way easier. The upper classes worked as fur traders, merchants and entrepreneurs. While the Upper Middle class worked as bankers, lawyers and doctors.
They started the opening of synagogues, they grew very prosperous towns and then they developed west coast fishing industries. While the others worked on telegraphs.
By 1901, Jewish communities had sprung up all over Canada. Montreal still maintained the largest number of Jews, with 6,975, followed by Toronto with 3,103. Winnipeg had 1,164 Jews, Vancouver had 224, and Nova Scotia, 152. From 1901 to 1911, 52,484 Jewish immigrants came to Canada, settling from coast to coast.By 1901, Jewish communities had sprung up all over Canada. Montreal still maintained the largest number of Jews, with 6,975, followed by Toronto with 3,103. Winnipeg had 1,164 Jews, Vancouver had 224, and Nova Scotia, 152. From 1901 to 1911, 52,484 Jewish immigrants came to Canada, settling from coast to coast.
Canadian Jews or, alternatively, Jewish Canadians are Canadian citizens of the Jewish faith or Jewish ethnicity. Jewish Canadians are a part of the greater Jewish diaspora and form the fourth largest Jewish community in the world, exceeded only by those in Israel, the United States, and France. As of 2011, Statistics Canada listed 329,500 adherents to the Jewish religion in Canada[6] and 309,650 who claimed Jewish as an ethnicity. So why did they immigrate to Canada in the first place?
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