Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Machiavelli and the Prince

The Prezi I use for my class in IES Abroad Rome, Politics and the Philosophy of power in the land of Machiavelli
by

Alberto Bitonti

on 9 October 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Machiavelli and the Prince

Hereditary
states

The structure
of the Prince

Dedication
Machiavelli's game
1494
. Piero de' Medici (son of Lorenzo) flees Florence > the Republic is restored
1469
. May 3. Niccolò Machiavelli was born n Florence.
1498
. June 19.Machiavelli is appointed to an office of the second chancery.
July 14. Appointed secretary of the Dieci di Libertà e Pace
1498
, May 23. Savonarola is sent to the stake
1512
. Machiavelli is deprived of office by the Medici, back in charge of the city
1527
. Machiavelli dies at the age of 58.
Chapter 1: The Subject
STATES
REPUBLICS
PRINCIPALITIES
hereditary
new
entirely new
annexed/ acquired
accustomed to live under a prince
accustomed to live in freedom
acquired by the arms of the prince himself
acquired by the arms of others
acquired by ability
acquired by fortune
Quot sint genera principatuum et quibus modis acquirantur
Chapter 2: hereditary principalities
De principatibus hereditariis
fewer difficulties to hold them
not to transgress the customs
deal prudently with circumstances
love
Aristotle
monarchy
aristocracy
democracy
tyranny
oligarchy
polity
Chapter 3, 4 & 5: Mixed principalities
De principatibus mixtis
New conquests added to older states
Chapter 3
same language, same province, not accustomed to self-government
easier
to keep
1. family of their former lord is extinguished
2. neither their laws nor their taxes are altered
differing in language, customs, or laws
reside there / install colonies / keep there cavalry and infantry
more expensive
indulge the lesser powers of the area without increasing their power
keep down the more powerful people
not to allow other powers to gain reputation
Why the kingdom of Darius, conquered
by Alexander, did not rebel against the successors of Alexander at his death
Chapter 4
principalities governed by a prince, with a body of servants
great difficulties in seizing them, but, once conquered, great ease in holding them
principalities governed by a prince and barons
ease in seizing them, but great difficulties in holding them
e.g. Turk Empire
e.g. France
exterminate the family of the Prince
Concerning the way to govern cities or principalities which lived under their own laws before they were annexed
Chapter 5
1.
Ruin them
2.
Go to live there
3.
Let them keep their own orders but install a "puppet" regime
e.g. Rome and Carthage
e.g. Sparta and Athens
liberty and old customs never forgotten
Mixed principalities
Chapter 6, 7, 8 & 9: New principalities
New principalities
Chapter 6
De principatibus novis qui armis propriis et virtute acquiruntur
Examples of great men
Moses, Cyrus, Romulus, Theseus
Be like a wise archer
serendipity
fortune
virtues
They acquire the rule with trouble, but once they get the power, they keep it more easily
introduction of a new order
Only armed prophets, like Moses, succeed in bringing lasting change
Chapter 7
De principatibus novis qui alienis armis et fortuna acquiruntur
easy time gaining power but hard time keeping it
money, armies, will
(unstable factors, moody)
lack of know how
lack of friend forces
Chapter 8
De his qui per scelera ad principatum pervenere
Wickedness.
Agathocles
(361-289 BC)
Liverotto from Fermo
(1470-1502 AD)
1501
do it fast, do it all
Chapter 9
De principatu civili
civic principalities
selection of one's fellow citizens
Supported by the great (those who wish to command the people)
Supported by the people (those who wish not to be commanded by the great)
unstable
earn people's support
keep their support
Chapter 10: measuring the strength of principalities
Chapter 11: Ecclesiastical principalities
Chapter 12, 13 & 14
De principatibus ecclesiasticis
Quomodo omnium principatuum vires perbendi debeant
The Qualities of the Prince
Chapter 15: "good" and "bad" qualities
De his rebus quibus homines et praesertim principes laudantur aut vituperantur
Chapter 16: on generosity
De liberalitate et parsimonia
De crudelitate et pietate; et an sit melius amari quam timeri, vel e contra
Quomodo fides a principibus sit servanda
De contemptu et odio fugiendo
Chapter 17: to be loved or feared?
Chapter 18: loyalty
Chapter 19: never be hated
The Qualities of the Prince
Chapter 15: "good" and "bad" qualities
De his rebus quibus homines et praesertim principes laudantur aut vituperantur
Chapter 16: on generosity and parsimony
De liberalitate et parsimonia
De crudelitate et pietate; et an sit melius amari quam timeri, vel e contra
Quomodo fides a principibus sit servanda
Chapter 17: to be loved or feared?
Chapter 18: loyalty
De contemptu et odio fugiendo
Chapter 19: never be hated
a new methodological approach
effectual truth ("verità effettuale") of the thing, rather than to the imagination of it
generous
rapacious
cruel
compassionate
faithful
effeminate
brave
lascivious
sincere
frivolous
religious
chaste
a new criterion
does it help to preserve the State?
some "virtues" lead to ruin
some "vices" lead to security and good
reputation
to maintain the name
taxes
offended many and rewarded few
reproach of being miserly
you are already a prince, or you're in a way to become one
you are spending
yours, or your subjects'
others'
hate
far safer to be feared than loved if you cannot be both
a prince should not interfere with the property of their subjects, their women, or the life of somebody without proper justification
armies
pessimistic anthropological conception
Men worry less about doing an injury to one who makes himself loved than to one who makes himself feared
(not excessively)
experience
dissimulation
illusion of being reliable in keeping his word
He should appear to be compassionate, faithful to his word, guileless, and devout. And indeed he should be so. But his disposition should be such that, if he needs to be the opposite, he knows how
maintain the State
against faith, humanity, religion
pity
faith
integrity
humanity
religion
don't touch
the properties or
the women of your subjects
reputation
conspiracies
2 fears
other Princes (foreign powers)
subjects
good armies and good friends
keep the people happy
On military affairs
Advice of prudence
Chapter 20, 21, 22 & 23
Being prudent
An arces et multa alia quae cotidie a principibus fiunt utilia an inutilia sint
Chapter 20
disarm your subjects
keep subjected lands divided
build fortresses?
it always depends on conditions and times...
arm the disarmed, they'll be loyal to you
disarm the armed, you show diffidence, and they'll hate you
mercenaries
if it's a new conquered state, added to the old, leave only those on your side armed
divide et impera?
those you distrust will serve you better
good in peace, not in war
the best fortress is your people
Quod principem deceat ut egregius habetur
Chapter 21
great deeds
don't be neutral, take a side
show love for virtues
celebrations, events
be an example of humanity,
keeping your dignity
honor arts and those who increase the glory of the state
Chapter 22
De his quos a secretis principes habent
choose your ministers (staff) carefully
a good minister pursues the good of the prince, not his own
a good prince makes his ministers rich and honored
Chapter 23
Quomodo adulatores sint fugiendi
three types of intelligence
1. understands by oneself
2. understand through others
3. does not understand, nor listens
avoid the plague of flatterers
they should tell you the truth,
but without losing the reverence
choose a few advisors, who can tell you the truth
when consulted
be firm
in your deliberations
The Italian situation
Chapter 24, 25 & 26
Chapter 24
Cur Italiae principes regum amiserunt
By obeying all the described precepts, a new prince is safer and looks like an old prince
Men care for the present, not the past
Those who lost their states, did so because of
a defect of arms
hate by the people
lack of support from the great
Chapter 25
Quantum fortuna in rebus humanis possit, et quomodo illi sit occurrendum
FORTUNE
&
VIRTUE
Chapter 26
The Italian Job
Exhortatio ad capessendam Italiam in libertatemque a barbaris vindicandam
it is better to be impetuous than cautious, because fortune is a woman
1513
. Machiavelli writes
The Prince
.
Quomodo omnium principatuum vires perpendi debeant
Chapter 10
they need others
they can defend themselves
(able to fight on open field)
taking shelter within
city walls
De principatibus ecclesiasticis
Chapter 11
You get those by fortune or virtue
You keep those with no effort
irony
On military affairs
Quot sint genera militiae et de mercenariis militibus
Chapter 12
De militibus auxiliariis, mixtis et propriis
Chapter 13
Quod principem deceat circa militiam
Chapter 14
foundations for all states
good laws
GOOD ARMIES
ARMIES
of a Prince
its own
mercenary
auxiliary
mixed
useless and dangerous
unfaithful
ambitious
MERCENARY ARMIES
mercenary captain
excellent
not
pursues his own greatness, oppressing you, or others against your will
...
AUXILIARY
ARMIES
always harmful
united
obeying someone else
even worse than mercenary!
A prince should lead himself
A republic must send its best citizens
not reasonable that the armed obeys the unarmed
always exercise in war operations
know geography
read and study history
follow the great
Full transcript