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Sierra Leone

things to know about Sierra Leone
by

laica ormil

on 25 May 2010

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Transcript of Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone


Sierra Leone is a country in west
Africa.Its bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between Guinea and Liberia Land boundaries: total: 958 km
border countries: Guinea 652 km, Liberia 306 km
Sierra Leone has a poplulation
of 5.9 million people. "Mountain Lions" Capital City:
Freetown Natural Resources Diamonds titanium ore Bauxite Iron ore Gold Human Factor Health Total fertility rate:
5.88 children born/woman
HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate:
1.7%
HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS:
55,000
HIV/AIDS - deaths:
3,300
Major infectious diseases:
degree of risk: very high
food or waterborne diseases: bacterial and protozoal diarrhea, hepatitis A, and typhoid fever
vectorborne diseases: malaria and yellow fever
water contact disease: schistosomiasis
aerosolized dust or soil contact disease: Lassa fever
Education Literacy:
definition: age 15 and over can read and write English, Mende, Temne, or Arabic
total population: 35.1%
male: 46.9%
female: 24.4%
School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education):
total: 7 years
male: 8 years
female: 6 years
Education expenditures:
3.8% of GDP Economic Factor GDP GDP (purchasing power parity):
$4.307 billion
$ data are in 2008 US dollars
GDP (official exchange rate):
$1.971 billion
GDP - real growth rate: 6%
GDP - per capita (PPP):
$700
data are in 2008 US dollars
GDP - composition by sector:
agriculture: 49%
industry: 31%
services: 21%
Unemployment NA% Inflation Inflation rate (consumer prices):
11.7%
Economic makeup of country Household income or consumption by percentage share: lowest 10%: 0.5%
highest 10%: 43.6% (1989) Distribution of family income - Gini index:
62.9 (1989) Budget: revenues: $96 million expenditures: $351 million (2000 est.) Inflation rate (consumer prices): 11.7% (2007 est.) Central bank discount rate: NA Commercial bank prime lending rate:
25% (31 December 2007) Stock of money: $184.6 million (31 December 2007) Stock of quasi money: $177.7 million (31 December 2007) Stock of domestic credit: $162.9 million (31 December 2007) Market value of publicly traded shares: $NA Agriculture - products: rice, coffee, cocoa, palm kernels, palm oil, peanuts; poultry, cattle, sheep, pigs; fish Industries: diamond mining; small scale manufacturing (beverages, textiles, cigarettes, footwear); petroleum refining, small commercial ship repair Industrial production growth rate:
NA% Electricity - production:
250 million kWh (2006 est.) Electricity - consumption:
232.5 million kWh (2006 est.) Electricity - exports:
0 kWh (2007 est.) Electricity - imports:
0 kWh (2007 est.) Oil - production:
0.7008 bbl/day (2007 est.) Oil - consumption:
8,430 bbl/day (2006 est.) Oil - exports:
432.3 bbl/day (2005) Oil - imports:
8,271 bbl/day (2005) Oil - proved reserves:
0 bbl (1 January 2006 est.) Natural gas - production:
0 cu m (2007 est.) Natural gas - consumption:
0 cu m (2007 est.) Natural gas - exports:
0 cu m (2007 est.) Natural gas - imports:
0 cu m (2007 est.) Natural gas - proved reserves:
0 cu m (1 January 2006 est.) Current account balance:
-$63 million (2007 est.) Exports:
$216 million f.o.b. (2006) Exports - commodities:
diamonds, rutile, cocoa, coffee, fish Exports - partners:
Belgium 49.3%, US 20.5%, Netherlands 4.5%, Canada 4.1% (2007) Imports:
$560 million f.o.b. (2006) Imports - commodities:
foodstuffs, machinery and equipment, fuels and lubricants, chemicals Imports -partners: Cote d'Ivoire 10%, China 10%, US 9.5%, UK 6.2%, Netherlands 5.1%, India 4.7% (2007) Debt - external: $1.61 billion (2003 est.) Exchange rates:
leones (SLL) per US dollar - NA (2007), 2,961.7 (2006), 2,889.6 (2005), 2,701.3 (2004), 2,347.9 (2003)
Political type of government constitutional democracy

project hydroelectric Ethiopian experts begin work on Sierra Leone hydroelectric project

Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation (EEPCo) has been hired to manage the recently constructed Bumbuna Hydroelectric Project (BHP) in Sierra Leone by the west African country’s National Power Authority (NPA). The project was undertaken by Italian-based firm, Salini Costruttori.
A tender launched by NPA, in July 2009, to attract foreign power companies to operate and maintain installations in accordance with internationally recognised standards was won by EEPCo, which sees itself working abroad for the first time in its half-century-plus-experience in the management of hydroelectric power dams in Ethiopia.
EEPCo has already deployed 15 engineers to Sierra Leone to manage and maintain Bumbuna. The state run Ethiopian company had originally planned to send over 40 staff to the site, including drivers and managers. A decision by the management, however, saw a reduction of their expatriate staff. Meanwhile, Mehiret Dibebe, CEO of EEPCo, has confirmed that the corporation has already begun operations in Sierra Leone.
EEPCo will train Sierra Leonean power authorities on the procedures needed to run their plant in the future. The Ethiopian experts are expected to remain in the West African country for at least 18 months.
Mehiret Dibebe also added that EEPCo professionals on dam management are currently managing nine hydropower sites, including two recently inaugurated dams in Ethiopia.
June last year, the Government of Sierra Leone received a supplementary loan from the African Development Fund to meet the cost of completing Bumbuna. Freetown decided to apply part of the funds for the management, operation and maintenance of the plant and associated transmission facilities.

Ethiopian Electric Power Corporation (EEPCo) has been hired to manage the recently constructed Bumbuna Hydroelectric Project (BHP) in Sierra Leone by the west African country’s National Power Authority (NPA). The project was undertaken by Italian-based firm, Salini Costruttori.
A tender launched by NPA, in July 2009, to attract foreign power companies to operate and maintain installations in accordance with internationally recognised standards was won by EEPCo, which sees itself working abroad for the first time in its half-century-plus-experience in the management of hydroelectric power dams in Ethiopia.
EEPCo has already deployed 15 engineers to Sierra Leone to manage and maintain Bumbuna. The state run Ethiopian company had originally planned to send over 40 staff to the site, including drivers and managers. A decision by the management, however, saw a reduction of their expatriate staff. Meanwhile, Mehiret Dibebe, CEO of EEPCo, has confirmed that the corporation has already begun operations in Sierra Leone.

EEPCo will train Sierra Leonean power authorities on the procedures needed to run their plant in the future. The Ethiopian experts are expected to remain in the West African country for at least 18 months.
Mehiret Dibebe also added that EEPCo professionals on dam management are currently managing nine hydropower sites, including two recently inaugurated dams in Ethiopia.
June last year, the Government of Sierra Leone received a supplementary loan from the African Development Fund to meet the cost of completing Bumbuna. Freetown decided to apply part of the funds for the management, operation and maintenance of the plant and associated transmission facilities.
Troubled past
Construction on BHP began in 1970, but conflict in the diamond-rich country hampered its progress. The project was eventually suspended in 1997 when it was about 85 per cent complete. Eight years later, in June 2005, the World Bank approved the resumption of construction.
BHP was finally commissioned in November 2009 by the country’s president.
The project entails a hydro-power complex, located on the Seli River, in the valleys of the Sula Mountains, approximately 200 kilometres northeast of the capital, Freetown, in the Kalansogoia Chiefdom of the Tonkolili district. It encompasses an 88 metre high rock-filled dam with an asphalted concrete upstream face; a 50 MW power station, housing two turbine-generator units of 25 MW each; a transmission system consisting of 200 km of 161 kV transmission line from the power station to Freetown.
Much of Sierra Leone’s power generation capacity was hampered during the civil war. The country currently experiences frequent blackouts and in the Freetown peninsula, electricity supply is available to customers only for a few hours every week. Most areas in the interior of the country are wholly or largely without access electricity.
Italian-based Salini Costruttori is currently constructing three hydropower projects in Ethiopia; Gibe III and Tana Beles. It also constructed Gilgel Gibe I and II.
Other Project
Conflicts Diamond SIERRA LEONE:
In July 1999, following over eight years of civil conflict, negotiations between the Government of Sierra Leone and the Revolutionary United Front led to the signing of the Lome Peace Agreement under which the parties agreed to the cessation of hostilities, disarmament of all combatants and the formation of a government of national unity. The United Nations and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) helped facilitate the negotiations. In resolution 1270 of 22 October 1999, the Security Council established the United Nations Mission in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) to help create the conditions in which the parties could implement the Agreement. Subsequently, the number of personnel were increased and tasks to be carried out by UNAMSIL adjusted by the Council in resolutions 1289 of 7 February 2000 and 1299 of 19 May 2000, making UNAMSIL the largest peacekeeping force currently deployed by the United Nations.
Following international concern at the role played by the illicit diamond trade in fuelling conflict in Sierra Leone, the Security Council adopted resolution 1306 on 5 July 2000 imposing a ban on the direct or indirect import of rough diamonds from Sierra Leone not controlled by the Government of Sierra Leone through a Certificate of Origin regime. An arms embargo and selective travel ban on non-governmental forces were already in effect under resolution 1171 of 5 June 1998.
On 31 July and 1 August 2000, Ambassador Anwarul Karim Chowdhury, Chairman of the Security Council Committee established pursuant to resolution 1132 (1997) concerning Sierra Leone, presided over the first ever exploratory public hearing by the Security Council in New York. The hearing was attended by representatives of interested Member States, regional organizations, non-governmental organizations, the diamond industry and other relevant experts. The hearing exposed the link between the trade in illicit Sierra Leone diamonds and trade in arms and related materiel. The ways and means for developing a sustainable and well-regulated diamond industry in Sierra Leone were also discussed.
As called for by resolution 1306 of 5 July 2000, the Secretary-General, on 2 August 2000, established a Panel of Experts, to collect information on possible violations of the arms embargo and the link between trade in diamonds and trade in arms and related materiel, consider the adequacy of air traffic control systems in the West African region for the purpose of detecting flights suspected of contravening the arms embargo, and report to the Council with observations and recommendations on ways of strengthening the arms and diamonds embargoes no later than 31 October 2000. The Chairman of the Panel was Martin Chungong Ayafor (Cameroon). The other members were Atabou Bodian (Senegal), Johan Peleman (Belgium), Harjit Singh Sandhu (India) and Ian Smillie (Canada). The Panel submitted its report to the Security Council on 19 December 2000 (S/2000/1195). On 25 January 2001 the Security Council, at its 4264th meeting, considered the report of the panel of experts.
Other Project Sierra Leone More problems security People have been raped kids i the military Air
There are ten regional airports in Sierra Leone, and one international airport. The Lungi International Airport located in the coastal town of Lungi in Northern Sierra Leone is the primary airport for domestic and international travel to or from Sierra Leone. Passengers cross the river to Aberdeen Heliports in Freetown by hovercraft, ferry or a helicopter. Helicopters are also available from the airport to other major cities in the country. The airport has paved runways longer than 3,047m. The other airports have unpaved runways, and seven have runways 914 to 1,523 metres long; the remaining two have shorter runways.

Prohibition from E.U. air operations
This country appears on the E.U. list of prohibited countries with regard to the certification of airlines. This means that no airline which is Sierra Leone registered may operate services of any kind within the European Union. This is due to substandard safety standards.

Water
Sierra Leone has the third largest natural harbor in the world, where international shipping berth at the Queen Elizabeth II Quay in Government Wharf in central Freetown. There are 800 km of waterways in Sierra Leone, of which 600 km are navigable year-round. Major port cities are Bonthe, Freetown, Sherbro Island and Pepel.
Highways
There are 11,700 kilometers (about 7,270 Miles) of highways in Sierra Leone, of which 936 km (about 581 miles) are paved (about 8% of the roads). Sierra Leone highways are linked to Conakry, Guinea, and Monrovia, Liberia.

Solutions
give family with low income free
education raise the price of their diamond build roads increase tariff GDP (purchasing power parity):
$4.307 billion
$ data are in 2008 US dollars
GDP (official exchange rate):
$1.971 billion
GDP - real growth rate: 6%
GDP - per capita (PPP):
$700
data are in 2008 US dollars
GDP - composition by sector:
agriculture: 49%
industry: 31%
services: 21%
Full transcript