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Bridging the Gap: Strategic Framing and Budget Advocacy in Tanzania

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Tony Baker

on 11 April 2014

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Transcript of Bridging the Gap: Strategic Framing and Budget Advocacy in Tanzania

Issue
Values
Causal Chains
Solutions
Simplifying
Models

Analogies
Social Math
Numbers
“Two residents wade through chest-deep water after finding bread and soda from a local grocery store after Hurricane Katrina came through the area in New Orleans, Louisiana.”

AFP/Getty Images/
Chris Graythen)
Tue Aug 30, 3:47 AM ET
Research
through
reflection

Strategic Framing and
Budget Advocacy in Tanzania


Tony Baker

Bridging the Gap:
What is a frame?
2009
2010
July 2009
August 2009
January 2010
February 2010
November 2009
October 2009
June 2010
Elements
of the
Frame

Visuals
Messengers
Tone
Context
“A young man walks through chest deep floodwater after looting a grocery store in New Orleans on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2005."

Associated Press
Tue Aug 30,11:31 AM ET
Screen shot of CNN covering the arrival of U.S. troops in Baghdad’s Firdos Square on April 9, 2003.
Coverage of the arrival of U.S. troops in Baghdad’s Firdos Square on April 9, 2003, taken from the vantage point of the Palestine Hotel. Picture from the Reuters International News Wire.
Levels of Understanding
How information is sent
How information is received
“Frames are organizing principles that are socially shared and persistent over time, that work symbolically to meaningfully structure the social world.”
Because frames (or reframes) can be used to make your message more effective.
Why are frames important for advocates?
Because “When the facts don’t fit the frame, the facts get rejected, not the frame."
Because they “trigger meaning.”
Framing
Reframing
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Issue
Exclusive Authority Common Good
Government Government
Budget/Financial Management Budget/Financial Management
LEVEL ONE:
LEVEL TWO:
LEVEL THREE:
One of the most effective communications strategies for advocates is to help the public understand that we have the ability to solve many pressing social problems. However, it is remarkable how much of our communication is spent describing every aspect of a problem in great detail, trotting out statistic after statistic accompanied by memorable case stories, without discussing solutions in detail. Often, when solutions are presented, they are highly rhetorical and abstract, in contrast to the vivid and concrete picture we paint of the problem. This leaves the public feeling that social problems are overwhelming and unsolvable.
What’s the problem with numbers?
Not everyone’s an analyst!
They don’t tell the story…
…except for just the crisis story.
"making large numbers comprehensible and compelling by placing them in a social context"
Simplification
Concrete comparison
Frame reinforcement
Assigns responisibility to information/consequences by answering the questions:

“Why is this important?”
“How did this happen?” and,
“Who is responsible?”
the pre-existing condition
what then happened
the ultimate social problem
initial factor
mediating factor
final consequence
initial factor:
mediating factor:
final consequence:
“reduces a complex problem to a simple, concrete analogy or metaphor (and) contributes to understanding by helping people organize information into a clear picture in their heads, including facts and ideas previously learned but not organized in a coherent way.”
Nat Kendall-Taylor, Simplifying Models: What they do, Why they matter, and Where they come from, 2010
Stephen D. Reese, Framing Public Life, 2001 as in FrameWorks Institute, Framing Public Issues, 2002
"Framing refers to the way a story is told – its selective use of particular symbols, metaphors,
and messengers, for example – and to the way these cues, in turn, trigger the shared and
durable cultural models that people use to make sense of their world."
So then what is framing?
FrameWorks Institute, Framing Public Issues, 2002
LEVEL ONE:
Big ideas, like freedom, justice, community, success, responsibility
LEVEL TWO:
Issue-types, like the environment or child care
LEVEL THREE:
Specific issues, like mining or pension
Levels of Understanding
Stewardship
LEVEL ONE:
Environment
LEVEL TWO:
Deforestation
LEVEL THREE:
Levels of Understanding
Progress
LEVEL ONE:
Education
LEVEL TWO:
Education
Budget
LEVEL THREE:
Doyle Canning & Patrick Reinsborough, Re:Imagining Change: An Introduction to Story-based Strategy, 2009
Diane Benjamin, A FrameWorks Institute FrameByte: Sharing Solutions, 2007
Social Math
FrameWorks Institute, Framing Public Issues, 2002
Simplifying model
Adapted from Charlotte Ryan, Prime Time Activism: Media Strategies for Grassroots Organizations, 1999
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