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Copy of Employment Skills

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Christopher McCulloch

on 3 December 2015

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Transcript of Copy of Employment Skills

Employment Skills
Career Planning
Skills Inventory
What do employers really want?
Traditional Vs Nontraditional Job Hunt
Traditional/Nontraditional - What's the difference?
Preparing for Work
Major Topics
Career Planning

Job Search Strategies

Creating Employment Documents

Interviewing

Marine Engineer
Marine Engineering Systems Designer
Marine Diesel Mechanic
Ship's Officer
Workopolis.ca says:
The most in demand
soft skills
for Canadian employers are

A positive attitude
Communication skills
Strong work ethic
Customer service skills
Teamwork

Careernotes.ca says:
Top 10
transferable/essential skills
Communication skills
Teamwork skills
Time management skills
Problem-solving skills
Organization skills
Learning skills
Computer skills
Listening skills
Creativity skills
Leadership skills

Transferable Skills Components
Personal Management Skills
Teamwork Skills
Fundamental Skills
Personal Management Skills
These are the skills that enable an employee to thrive in a rapidly-changing workplace.
Teamwork Skills
These are the skills that enable productivity, efficiency, and group success
Fundamental Skills
These are the skills associated with formal education or training
Positive attitudes
and behaviours
Taking initiative
and
responsibility
Adaptability
Team worker skills
: Group management and conflict resolution.
Leadership skills
: Decision making and task organization
Communication skills
(verbal and nonverbal
Information management
Critical thinking
and
problem solving
Number use
Skills Vs Abilities
Skills
are learned and practiced until they are usable. For example, driving a standard vehicle.
Abilities
are innate and recognizable through development. For example, a natural "gift" or aptitude for math...or invisibility.
What skills do you think you have already?

What skills might you really have?

What abilities do you think you have?

What abilities might you have and not recognize?
Skills and Abilities Assessment
Hard, Soft, and Transferable Skills
The following is a brief list of the kinds of skills you might find in each category...
Hard Skills:
Ship navigation
Log keeping
Bilge operations
Fluids management
AutoCAD illustration
Valve stripping and replacement
Machining
Soldering
etc...
Soft Skills:
Communicating verbally
Perseverance
Time management
Relational communication
Problem solving
Leadership
Prioritizing work
Professionalism
Teamwork and Facilitation
etc...
Transferable Skills:
Written communication
Analytical skills
Cash operations
Office equipment use
Computer skills
Research skills
Drafting
Account record-keeping
Presentation skills
etc...
You may not know what you want from a workplace, from a job, or from a career. Making a career plan helps you to define that to yourself very clearly.
Determine your goals and motivations for working
Set achievable targets or "stepping stones" to get you where you want to be.
Work towards the achievement of those goals/targets
What motivates you?
Salary potential
Lifestyle/work-life balance
Aptitudes
Experiences
Personal comfort zones
Tradition
Interest/Curiosity
Setting goals...the SMARTER way! Make your goals
S
pecific
M
easurable
A
chievable
R
ealistic
T
imely
E
mpowering
R
eviewable
The value of a career plan is significant:
You are in control of the process
You can change it as required
It makes goals achievable

Profile yourself.
Ask...
What employment will be fulfilling for me?
What employment will best use my strengths?
What employment will help me meet my goals?


Figure out your strengths, and determine your weaknesses.
Visit trade shows

Review publications in
the field

Connect with professional organizations or associations.

Take advantage of course opportunities (in school)

Look at your self analysis and find companies that match up.
Research - How do I do it?
What the market looks like...
PArt-Time/Contractual Work
Self-Employment/Consulting Work
International Opportunities
Huge Skilled Trades Gap
Offshore Growth
"GReen" Developments
What should I look for?
Company growth plans and vision statements
Fields of opportunity
Divisions with specific mandates
Marketing information
New acquisitions/developments in the company
Alignment with your interests
Skill requirements
Where should I look for it?
Websites and Company Publications

Trade Journals (i.e. library journals)

Placement Offices

Network Connections
"Insider" information
Inquiry letters/phone calls
Preliminary visits
Networking
Networking is...
building, developing, and maintaining personal and professional relationships in the job hunt.
Networking is...
staying connected to your field, being up to date on new advancements, opportunities, and ideas.
Networking is...
being noticed; being present; being connected.
"Traditional": Employment Centres, Ads, Bulletins/Postings, Yellow Pages, Placement Officers...
Passive
"Non-Traditional": Networks/Social Media, Active Presentation, Research, Penetrating the Hidden Job Market...
Active
A few Tips...
Check job posting sites and placement offices frequently.

Visit the Newfoundland Board of Trade webpage for industry links.

Research the field - stay current with trends, advances, and openings, and involve yourself with the industry.

Review EOIs (Expressions of Interest) and RFPs (Requests for Proposals). Be proactive! Market your skills by being attentive to the job climate and following industry leaders.
Employment Documents
(C) Bob Thaves, 2003. Reproduced for educational purposes.
Interview Preparation
Identifying Opportunities
Keep an "ear to the ground" for upcoming career seminars, professional training, or job fairs.

Don't underestimate the value of volunteering...it's a valuable resource for development

Visit and find out about companies you might want to work for.

The "hidden job market" - 80% of opportunities come from unexpected places
Hidden Job Market...
THe Resume - Your Life, on Paper
Your resume does the following:
Summarizes and provides quick and informative access to an employer regarding your skills and abilities

Presents an orderly and objective selection of key factors that make you employable.

A resume is given due
consideration if it is:

Easily readable, easily understandable, and dynamic.

Presenting information the employer wants to see in order to appropriately fill the job.

Uncluttered with irrelevant information.

Clearly answering the question "what can you do for us?"
Do not lie or misrepresent yourself!!!
Building A Resume
Resumes come in three different types...
Chronological
Functional
Hybrid
Chronological resumes:
information presented in reverse chronological order.

Best used by students who have not had much work experience, recent graduates, or people who are working in a specific field.
Functional resumes:
Present skills, abilities, and experience first, highlighting what you can offer.

Best used by career changers, people who have not been continuously employed, and people who have done a number of different things.
Hybrid resumes:
Combination of functional and chronological.

Most effective form. Skills and abilities are summarized in a qualifications area, with the familiar reverse chronological organization.
Employment History
Personal Info
Education
References
Include name and multiple ways of contacting you.

Place at the top of the document - this should be easily seen.
Position
Company Name
Company Location (town, province)
Dates Worked
Duties/Responsibilities (use action words)
Other (recognition, involvement)

Program name
School name
School location (geographical – town/province)
Dates attended
Expected graduation (if program incomplete)
Other (average, courses, awards, etc.)

Name
Title or Position
Company Name
Complete Mailing Address
Telephone Number(s)
Other (email/fax)

Effective Resumes...
Document design features:
Use plain white paper
Use standard font size (12 pt.)
Use and highlight key words
Effectively use white space
Consider using a summary of qualifications box/hybrid resume type
Avoid templates
Reverse chronological
Functional/Hybrid
Use action words and key phrases

When including an objective, be specific to the job and company that you want to work for.
Note:
Objectives are not always useful.
The Cover LEtter
Skill Families & Power Words
Management Skills
Words demonstrating the types of skills used in management positions:
Administered
Developed
Coordinated
Planned
Oversaw
Others...
Communication Skills
Words used to indicate communicative tasks and accomplishments:
Authored
Edited
Promoted
Persuaded
Negotiated
Others...
Research Skills
Words used to describe research tasks and accomplishments:
Collected
Evaluated
Reviewed
Surveyed
Summarized
Others...
Technical Skills
Number/Math Skills
Words used to describe technical tasks and accomplishments:
Assembled
Designed
Programmed
Constructed
Repaired
Upgraded
Words used to describe work with numbers, accounts, or other math skills:
Administered
Balanced
Appraised
Calculated
Solved
Others...
Instructional Skills
Words used to describe presentation and instruction:
Adapted
Facilitated
Enabled
Developed
Delivered
Others...
Creative Skills
Words used to describe creation and innovation:
Conceptualized
Directed
Illustrated
Invented
Integrated
Shaped
Revised
Synthesized
Others...
"Helping" Skills
Words used to describe counseling, leadership, and empathic skills:
Assisted
Clarified
Counseled
Coached
Represented
Clerical/Detail Skills
Words used to describe organizational, constructive tasks or accomplishments:
Catalogued
Arranged
Executed
Monitored
Organized
Validated
Screened
Implemented
Others...
What It Does
Transmits the resume

Interprets the facts to prove your worth

Conveys essential information

Secures an interview
What Should Be In It
Personal introduction

Demonstration of interest in company and position through specific notes.

Demonstration of skills and abilities that make you the ideal candidate.
How to Write It
Apply the 3-part structure: Introduction, Body, Conclusion.

Use action or "power" words where possible to highlight, clarify, and promote key qualifications.

Tailor to the job posting, and link it to your resume. Try to cover as many of the job requirements as you can.

Use the "You" approach.

Find out who will be reading your letter, and address the letter to him or her.

Keep a copy for future reference.
Congratulations...We'd Like to Schedule an Interview!
What's Next...?
Interview types
Interview Planning
Interview Questions
Behavioral Interview
Employment Interview
Designed to assess how
the candidate reacted in
various situations

Questions assess response
abilities, rather than skill or
ability-based qualifications
Designed to assess candidate's suitability for employment

Questions assess qualifications and effectiveness.
Interview preparation is a key factor in your job hunt.

Know the most common interview questions
Prepare good answers
Research company and, if possible, interviewer
Have a copy of your resume and cover letter on hand
Prepare questions to ask the interviewer.

Interviews are not an
interrogation
; they are a
conversation.
Worksheet
As you work with your partner to prepare these answers, help one another out by encouraging each other to look at all aspects of their history - employment, education, other experiences - and use these to develop the question responses.
Most Common Interview Questions
Preparing Answers
Engaging the Interviewer
Phone Interviews
What were your duties in your last job?
Tell me about yourself.
What do you know about this position/what we do?
Why are you leaving/have you left your previous job?
When are you available to start?
What are your biggest strengths?
What are your biggest weaknesses?
Describe a challenge you faced with a colleague.
What motivates you?
Why should we hire you?
Why do you want to work for us?
Do you have any questions for me?
Tell me about Yourself...
Why Should We Hire You...
What are Your Weaknesses...
This is a test of confidence and communication skills, but also an evaluation of you as an investment.
Talk about how your strengths can work against you, or discuss how you've turned weaknesses into strengths.
Check the job description for requirements, provide an example of something you've done in your career and tie the success to the company you are interviewing with.
Interviewing is not an interrogation, but a conversation. By treating it as a dialogue, you get a chance to:
1) Demonstrate planning, research and initiative.
2) Further highlight skills and abilities while tailoring your approach to the company.
3) Find out more about the field and the company.
The Big Question: "Do you have any questions for me?
The aim is to say "yes, I do."
Types of Questions
Questions about upcoming projects
show that you are future-minded, forward thinking, and growth-oriented.
Questions about current issues or projects
allow you to present innovative solutions, present an outside perspective, and indicate where you may have faced something similar in the past.
Questions on trends and developments
show that you are sincere about working in the field, that your knowledge is current and extensive, and that you have an independent interest in learning. They may even point a company in a new direction.
What Non-Verbal Communication Says
Non-verbal communication skills mentioned...
Attire
Body Language
Intonations and sighs
Unprofessional appearance
No cell phone, no texting
Eye contact
Relaxation
Lean forward - engage the interviewer
Recap - Steps to Succeed
What are five points to remember about interviewing?

1) Practice and prepare.

2) Be memorable.

3) Think about perspective.

4) Honesty is the best policy

5) Be aware of body language

Interviews may be conducted via phone, which requires a different set of skills. Most importantly, remember that a phone interview is only one stage in the process. However, there are a few things to keep in mind:

1) Research
2) Do it in a quiet place
3) Keep your notes in front of you
4) Pay attention to the tone of your voice.
Points to remember:
1) The purpose is to weed out candidates
2) Don't talk too much
3) Listen well and carefully.
4) Prepare responses to the most common questions.
5) Never conduct an interview on a mobile phone
6) Be energetic in your voice and tone - no non-verbals are available to you.
7) Communicate interest
8) Ask for the next step - make sure to ask for a personal interview.
Full transcript