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Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven

This prezi will focus on the motifs and analysis of The Raven.
by

Jessica Isenberg

on 9 December 2010

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Transcript of Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven

Edgar Allan Poe's
"The Raven" Summary Theme Motifs
A lonely man, who is mourning the death of his beloved Lenore, is visited by a raven during a cold and dreary December night. The man decides to ask the raven questions about his beloved, to which the raven replies, "Nevermore." This consistent response enrages the narrator and forces him to the brink of madness. Unnamed Narrator The speaker of the poem is an unnamed man who is lonely and mourning the death of Leonore. Animals The black raven symbolizes "evilness" to the narrator. Eyes The narrator compares the eyes of the raven to a demon's eye. Dreaming The narrator appears to have fallen asleep when he meets the raven..."Nodded nearly napping, Time/Clocks The narrator is greeted by the raven at midnight. Insanity The narrator is driven to the brink of madness by the "talking raven, who he thinks is the reincarnation of a demon. The raven comes to embody the feelings death creates for humans. It shows the reader how extreme mourning and/or devotion can lead to madness.
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