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The Perks of Being a Wallflower

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Alejandra Narvaez

on 11 January 2013

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Transcript of The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Stephen Chbosky The Perks of Being a Wallflower Summary Themes Characters Symbolism Movie The book takes place in a suburb of Pittsburgh in the early 1990's. The main character, Charlie, is in his freshman year of high school. At the beginning of the book, Charlie is very shy and unpopular, but as the book progresses, he starts to come out of his shell. He befriends two seniors, Sam and Patrick, who are step brother and sister. He also becomes close to his English teacher, Bill, who helps Charlie thorugh ups and downs. Throughout the year, Charlie struggles with drugs, alcohol, and smoking, all the while on his journey to discover his true identity. Charlie Quotes "Charlie, we accept the love we think we deserve." (Pg. 27) Coming of Age -Freshman in high school.
-Emotionally unstable
-Passive personality
-Goes through periods of depression throughout the book
-Loves music Sam -One of Charlies best friends
-Helps Charlie come out of his "shell"
-Chain smoker
-Very outgoing and expressive Patrick -Sams step-brother
-Loves football
-Brad is his closet boyfriend
-Looks to Charlie when he is feeling lonely Aunt Helen -Dies in a car crash around Christmas time
-Charlie's favorite person in the whole world
-Plays a big part in Charlie's character
-Took advantage of Charlie when he was a boy -Experimenting with drugs (LSD and weed).
-Chain smoking with Sam and Patrick due to pressure he is under.
-Charlie begins to date Mary Elisabeth. Peer Pressure -Charlie begins to smoke and drink.
-Tries drugs under pressure.
-Going to parties to feel accepted by Sam and Patrick. Passive and Active Participation - Charlie goes from shy and introverted, to outgoing and social.
-Used to watch life go by. Now he participates and enjoys its ups and downs. Perks of Being a Wallflower -Charlie noticed things most would ignore.
-He could openly be himself when unnoticed.
-Lets life go by without participating. “So, I guess we are who we are for a lot of reasons. And maybe we'll never know most of them. But even if we don't have the power to choose where we come from, we can still choose where we go from there. We can still do things. And we can try to feel okay about them.” Music -Charlie expresses himself through music throughout the book.
-Gives cassette tapes as gifts with meaningful songs for each person.
-Way for him to relive memories and communicate feelings with others. Dancing -Charlie doesn't dance through out the book.
-Dances for the first time at the Homecoming dance.
-Represents him coming out of his shell and beginning to participate in life. Writing Style -The story is told through a series of anonymous letters written by Charlie.
-Writing appears to be very child like and immature. Bill -Charlies English teacher.
-Gives Charlie extra reading and essay assignments.
-Believes Charlie to be very smart and special.
-Confesses to want to move to NY and write plays. Friendship -Friends help Charlie out of depression.
-They are also one of the reasons he is depressed. (drugs, alcohol, smoking).
-Helped Charlie start participating in life. Family "I am very interested and fascinated by how everyone loves each other, but no one really likes each other." (60) -On the outside, Charlie family seems the perfect type; mom, dad, three kids.
-Charlie has a bad relationship with his brother.
-Charlie and her sister don't talk to each other.
-Aunt used to abuse of Charlie. "I'm thankful that my brother played football on television so nobody fought." (64) "My sister was counting on me, and this was the first time anyone ever counted on me for anything." (127) "I had never been to a party before." (32) "Things were worse an hour ago, and I was looking at this tree but it was a dragon and then a tree, and I remembered that one nice pretty weather day when I was part of the air." (101) "I figured that it was about time to stop smoking so much pot." (166) "Sometimes people use thought to not participate in life." (26) "He's a wallflower... You see things. You keep quiet about them. And you understand." (41) "You can't just sit there and put everybody's lives ahead of yours and think that counts as love." (214) "It was a great way to sit alone at a party and still feel a part of things." (184) "Dear friend," "It would be very nice to have a friend again. I would like that even more than a date." (23) "Sam sat down and started laughing. Patrick started laughing. I started laughing. And in that moment, I swear we were infinite." (42) "So, this is my life. And I want you to know that I am both happy and sad and I'm still trying to figure out how that could be." (2) "I look at people holding hands in the hallways, and I try to think about how it all works. At the school dances, I sit in the background, and I tap my toe, and I wonder how many couples will dance to 'their song.' In the hallways, I see the girls wearing the guys’ jackets, and I think about the idea of property. And I wonder if anyone is really happy. I hope they are. I really hope they are." (24-25) "I just wish that God or my parents or Sam or my sister or someone would just tell me what's wrong with me. Just tell me how to be different in a way that makes sense. To make this all go away. And disappear. I know that's wrong because it's my responsibility, and I know that things get worse before they get better because that's what my psychiatrist says, but this is a worse that feels too big." (139)
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