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Conscience vs. Heart

Theme project on "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
by

Cheyenne Dwyer

on 21 April 2014

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Transcript of Conscience vs. Heart

Conscience vs. Heart
Edgar M. Branch
Introduction
Image by Tom Mooring
Character and Cruelty in Huckleberry Finn
Conscience vs. Heart in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
Huckleberry Learns to Apologize
“It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger; but I done it, and i warn't ever sorry for it afterward, neither. I didn't do him no more mean tricks, and I wouldn’t of done that one if I’d a known it’d made him feel that way” (Twain 86).
Huck's emotional connection to Jim
“He was thinking about his wife and his children, away up yonder, and he was low and homesick; because he hadn’t ever been away from home before in his life; and I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks do for their’n. It don’t seem natural, but i reckon it’s so” (Twain 155).

By Cheyenne and Antonio
Huck Confuses Right and Wrong
“Irony appears on another level, for all Huck can think of as he tries to harden his heart against Jim is the way Jim would stand Huck's watch on the raft;the way Jim's face lit up whenever Huck returned to him; and the way Jim ‘would always call me honey, and pet me, ... and how good he always was ....’ It is Jim's goodness-as the Widow had defined goodness-that leads Huck to "badness" and Miss Watson's hell-fire….Huck commits himself to Miss Watson's "bad place" because of his intuitive sense of right, which agrees with the Widow's advice to help others” (Branch 191).
Dueling Ethical Concerns
“It takes shape as a duality in Huck's ethical perceptions. The moral intuition finally triumphs over the conventional code, all- though Huck continues to judge himself guilty in terms of that code”(Branch 192).

"The Two Providences: Thematic Form in 'Huckleberry Finn'"
Novel Quotes
Huck Recognizes Jim's Goodness
“But somehow I couldn’t seem to strike no places to harden me against him, but only the other kind. I’d see him standing my watch on top of his’n, ‘stead of calling me, so I could go on sleeping; and see him how glad he was when I come back out of the fog; and when I come to him again in the swamp, up there where the feud was; and such-like times; and would always call me honey, and pet me, and do everything he could think of for me, and how good he always was; and at last I struck the time I saved him by telling the men we had smallpox aboard, and he said I was so grateful, and said I was the best friend old Jim ever had in the world, and the only one he’s got now; and then I happened to look around and see that paper”(Twain 213).

Huck Feels Guilty for the Wrong Reasons
“I tried to make out to myself that I warn’t to blame, because I didn’t run Jim off from his rightful owner; but it warnt no use, conscience up and says, everytime, ‘But you knowed he was running for his freedom, and you could’a’ paddled ashore and told somebody.’... Conscience says to me, ‘What had poor Miss Watson done to you that you could see her nigger go off right under your eyes and never say one single word? What did that poor old woman do to you that you could treat her so mean? Why, she tried to learn you your book, she tried to learn you your manners, she tried to be good to you every way she knowed how. That’s what she done’” (Twain 87).
Pray
“I about made up my mind to pray, and see if I couldn’t try to quit being the kind of a boy I was and be better. So I kneeled down. But the words wouldn’t come. Why wouldn’t they? It warnt so use to hide it from Him. Nor from me, neither.
We are all a product of the society we come from.
“Though Huck is initially socialized to see Jim through the categories of 'nigger' and 'slave,' their journey together affords occasions wherein Jim reveals character, complexity, and intelligence which Huck had not before seen” (French 169)

Huck's Moral Climactic Moment
Twain's Reasoning
French's Analysis on Huck's Climax
“Huck's growing respect for Jim gives rise to the novel's central conflict, characterized years later by Twain in a notebook as a lash where a sound heart and a deformed conscience come into collision and conscience suffers defeat” (French 169).
I'LL GO TO HELL!
“I took it up, and held it in my hand. I was trembling because I’d got to decide, forever, betwixt two things, and I knowed it. I studied a minute, sort of holding my breath, and then says to myself: “All right, then, I’ll go to hell”- and tore it up” (Twain 214).








“The ending preserves the moral integrity of the novel, and while it
does show Huck's and Jim's limits of character, it also continues
to honor their points of moral excellence. The greatness of the
ending, like that of the rest of the novel, lies in the unnerving
realism with which it probes the dynamics of human meanness
and offers hope of friendship between the races, even in
America” (French 158).

Paths to Equality
Slave
“It was fifteen minutes before I could work myself up to go and humble myself to a nigger..."(Twain 86).
Good Person
" It is Jim's goodness-as the Widow had defined goodness-that leads Huck to "badness" and Miss Watson's hell-fire….Huck commits himself to Miss Watson's "bad place" because of his intuitive sense of right, which agrees with the Widow's advice to help others” (Branch 191).
Equal
I do believe he cared just as much for his people as white folks do for their’n. It don’t seem natural, but i reckon it’s so” (Twain 155).
Father/Friend
“Though Huck is initially socialized to see Jim through the categories of 'nigger' and 'slave,' their journey together affords occasions wherein Jim reveals character, complexity, and intelligence which Huck had not before seen” (French 169)
I knowed very well why they wouldn’t come. It was because my heart warn’t right; it was because I warn’t square; it was because I was playing double” (Twain 212).

Conscience vs. Heart
Ms. Watson's Teachings
Jim's character and actions
A morally sound human being
In Huck's early childhood he was taught by Miss Watson what the morals and values of society were
As Huck and Jim glide down the river, Jim portrays the morals and values of Miss watson, and earns respect from Huck. Followed by his own critique of the morals of society that brush off and are supported by young Huck.
The influence that the two parental figures in Huck's life ultimately leads him to follow his own ideas and make choices that his heart believes in
Conclusion
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