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Greek Mythology Governments and Politics

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Josaun Jackson

on 12 November 2013

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Transcript of Greek Mythology Governments and Politics

Greek Mythology Governments and Politics
Three Main Types of Governments
Aristotle divided Greek governments into monarchies, oligarchies, and democracies, and most historians still use these same divisions. For the most part, Greece began by having monarchies, then oligarchies, then democracies, but at each period there were plenty of city-states using a different system, and there were many which never did become democracies.
Reasons on why mythology government had three governments
The Greeks had a lot of different kinds of governments, because there were many different city-states in ancient Greece, and they each had needed there own government.
Describing the Mythology Governments
Monarchy:Rule by a king. One city-state whose government was a monarchy was the city-state of Corinth.
Oligarchy:Rule by a small group. One city-state whose government was an oligarchy was the city-state of Sparta.
Democracy:Rule by the citizens, voting in an assembly. One city-state whose government experimented for about a hundred years with democracy was the ancient city-state of Athens.
Greek Mythology Government Activity
Demes
Greek Dēmos, in ancient Greece, country district or village, as distinct from a polis, or city-state. Dēmos also meant the common people (like the Latin plebs). In Cleisthenes’ democratic reform at Athens (508/507 bc), the demes of Attica (the area around Athens) were given status in local and state administration. Males 18 years of age were registered in their local demes, thereby acquiring civic status and rights.
Most city-states in the Archaic period were ruled by oligarchies, which is a group of aristocrats (rich men) who tell everyone else what to do. Then in the 600s and 500s BC a lot of city-states were taken over by tyrants. Tyrants were usually one of the aristocrats who got power over the others by getting the support of the poor people. They ruled kind of like kings, but without any legal right to rule.
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