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Composition

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by

steve adams

on 14 October 2013

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Transcript of Composition

Identify a primary point of interest before taking the picture. When you've determined which area is the most important to you, you can compose to emphasize it. (Studying advertising photographs is a good way to get acquainted with emphasis in composition.)
Center of Interest
Part of simplicity, selective focus uses aperture control to focus only on the subject and minimize the visual impact of everything else in the composition.

Depth of Field and Aperture Control
Selective Focus
The arrangement of the Elements of Design and their relationship to each other (Principles) in an image. There are no fixed rules in photography, but there are guidelines which can often help you to enhance the impact of your photos. Following these guidelines will make you a better photographer.
Composition - What is it?
Basic Photographic
Composition

Photography 1-2
You can often change a picture dramatically by moving the camera up or down or, stepping to one side. One of the best ways to come up with a prize-winning photograph is to find an "unusual" point of view.
Dynamic Angle (Viewpoint)
A "frame" in a photograph is something in the foreground that leads you into the picture or gives you a sense of where the viewer is. For example, a branch and some leaves framing a shot of rolling hills and a valley, or the edge of an imposing rock face leading into a shot of a canyon. Framing can usually improve a picture. The "frame" doesn't need to be sharply focused. In fact if it is too sharply detailed, it could be a distraction.
Framing
A light subject will have more impact if placed against a dark background and vice versa. Contrasting colors may be used for emphasis, but can become distracting if not considered carefully
Contrast
The rule of thirds involves mentally dividing up your image using 2 horizontal lines and 2 vertical lines, as shown below. You then position the important elements in your scene along those lines, or at the points where they meet.
Rule of Thirds
Linear elements such as roads, waterways, and fences placed diagonally are generally perceived as more dynamic than horizontals.
Leading Lines
Generally, asymmetric or informal balance is considered more pleasing in a photograph than symmetric (formal) balance. In other words, placing the main subject off-center and balancing the "weight" with other objects (smaller or lower impact) will be more effective than placing the subject in the center.
Balance
Be sure that only the things you want the viewer to see appear in the picture. If there are numerous objects cluttering up the background, your message will be lost. If you can't find an angle or framing to isolate your subject, consider using depth of field control to keep the background out of focus.
Simplicity
Elements of Design
Principles of Design
Basic Photographic
Composition

Photography 1-2
center of interest (focal point)
balance
harmony
contrast
movement
rhythm
Principles of Design
line
shape
color
texture
value (light)
space
Elements of Design
Composition - What is it?
Center of Interest
What are you trying to take a picture of?
Rule of Thirds
Guidelines for Emphasizing the Center of Interest
It may sound clichéd, but the only rule in photography is that there are no rules. However, there are are number of established composition guidelines which can be applied in almost any situation, to enhance the impact of a scene.




These guidelines will help you take more compelling photographs, lending them a natural balance, drawing attention to the important parts of the scene, or leading the viewer's eye through the image.
Once you are familiar with these composition tips, you'll be surprised at just how universal most of them are. You'll spot them everywhere, and you'll find it easy to see why some photos "work" while others feel like simple snapshots.
Guidelines for Emphasizing the
Center of Interest
Simplicity
Selective Focus
Contrast
Balance
Framing
Dynamic Angle (Viewpoint)
Leading Lines
Guidelines Review
Guidelines Review
Center of Interest?
Rule of Thirds
Simplicity
Selective Focus
Contrast
Balance
Framing
Dynamic Angle
Leading Lines

Assignment: find one example of each of the concepts, save them and insert them into a Word document. Formulate a definition next to it using your own words
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