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On His Blindness

Sonnet
by

Gilberto Capistran

on 23 January 2013

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Transcript of On His Blindness

On His Blindness
by John Milton The Theme "When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
"Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?"
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies: "God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o'er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait." " On His Blindness is an Italian sonnet consisting of a rhyme scheme of abba, abba, cde, cde. It can be divided into an octave and a sestet.

The theme of the sonnet can be identified as Milton questioning his purpose in life as he turns blind and feels he can no longer serve God. On His Blindness The octave, "When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide
Lodg'd with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide,
"Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?"
I fondly ask. But Patience, to prevent", represents Milton's suffering and impatiance towards losing his only talent and ability to serve God.
The Octave includes literary devices such as a metaphor and an alliteration. The shift in tone of the sonnet starts at the end of the octave, and the beginning of the sestet.
The theme can be found here as Milton questions why he is denied of his ability to praise God. The Octave The Sestet, "That murmur, soon replies: "God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts: who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is kingly; thousands at his bidding speed
And post o'er land and ocean without rest:
They also serve who only stand and wait."", represents Milton's answer from Patience, which makes him realize that he does not need to serve God in order to get good things because good things don't arrive to the people that attempt to obtain them obliviously and obsessively.Milton realizes that good things come to the ones who wait.
The literary device in the sestet is the change in tone of the sonnet.
The theme can also be seen in the sestet as Milton demonstrates his suffering once again. The Sestet As stated before, the theme of the sonnet is
Milton suffering as he questions why the Lord
is taking away the talent that he loves the most,
and the one talent that he can use to praise him.

I personally thought the sonnet had a very good
message. The way Milton moved trought the rhymes
really made me feel his pain, but also imprinted in me
the moral of the story, which is "Good things come
to those who wait".
Full transcript