Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Persuasive Essay

How to write a persuasive essay
by

Rachel Irish

on 18 February 2011

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Persuasive Essay

Persuasive Essay How to Write a The Process The Parts The Process Prewrite
Research
Draft
Revise
Edit
Publish Prewrite:
Choose your topic
Brainstorm Pros and Cons
Choose your side - Pro or Con?
Create your outline Outline I. Introduction

II. Body
a. Strongest Point
b. Second Point
c. Third Point
d. Refutation

III. Conclusion Introduction An introduction is where you convince people to read what you write.
It needs to start with an attention-grabber, to pull the audience into your argument.
It also needs to explain what you will be arguing. This should be in your thesis statement. Body The body paragraphs are your actual argument
You should have at least three reasons supporting your side of the issue. Each reason should have its own paragraph
Start with your strongest reason first
Remember to use persuasive appeals to logos, pathos and ethos Refutation Refutation is finding an argument that the opposition will use to argue against your side and explaining why that argument won't work.

If you can, find one or two points from the other side to refute. Conclusion A conclusion is what people will remember when they finish reading.

It should tell them why your argument matters and what they need to do about it.

This is your Call to Action. 1. Attention Grabber Unusual detail or fact
Quotation
Short story
Question
Outrageous statement 2. Thesis Statement: A thesis statement should:
Tell the reader what your topic is
Set manageable limits on your topic
Suggest the organization of your paper
Full transcript