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Gods of War

IB American History year 1 Kayla Overbay, Mary Taylor Goeltz, Rebecca Schmidt, and Sophie Workman Johnson
by

Kayla Overbay

on 5 November 2012

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Transcript of Gods of War

Confederacy Union William Tecumseh Sherman Background
Battle of Vicksburg
Eastern Theatre vs. Lee Thomas Jackson:
The Man Behind the Wall Stonewall Jackson: the Foundation Stonewall's Battles Beschloss, Michael, and Hugh Sidey. “Ulysses S. Grant.” The White House. White House Historical Association, n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2012. <http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/ulyssessgrant>.
Biography. N.p., 2012. Web. 31 Oct. 2012. <http://www.biography.com/people/robert-e-lee-9377163?page=2>.
“Confederate General ‘Stonewall’ Thomas Jonathan Jackson.” American Civil War. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Oct. 2012. <http://americancivilwar.com/south/stonewall_jackson.html>.
Jackson, Mary Anna. Memoirs of “Stonewall” Jackson. 1993 ed. Dayton: Morningside Inc., 1993. Print.
Johnson, Robert Underwood, and Clarence Clough Buel. Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based upon “The Century War Series.” New Jersey: Castle, 1982. Print. What made Grant a great general? The Man, THE LEGEND Chancellorsville-Jackson versus Hooker
-Jackson and Lee split
- Hooker heads toward Lee
-Jackson comes up on Hooker's flank and Fightin' Joe runs William T. Sherman was a soldier,
businessman, educator, and author. He has
been called "the first modern general" and is
one of the most important figures of the
Civil War. Early Life He was born in Ohio in 1820
Father died when he was 9 so he was raised by wealthy neighbor
Raised by the Ewings, who paid for him to go to West Point Military Academy
Attended Catholic Church regularly
Excelled academically at West Point but earned around 150 demerits per year. Life before War Robert E. Lee,
Virginia Man Antietam Background Gettysburg Born January 19, 1807
Father was "Light-Horse Harry"
Helped family
Attended West Point Military Academy
Married Mary Custis; had 3 sons and 4 daughters
Hero in Mexican War
Turned down Lincoln's offer to have him lead the Union because of his loyalty to Virginia Took risks
Believed in his soldiers Hardships
Positivity towards goals GODS OF WAR Works Cited Adult Life In 1840 he entered the army as a 2nd lieutenant in the Second Seminole War in Florida
Only God of War who didn't fight in the Mexican American War
Resigned in 1853 to try banking and law, and failed at both
In 1859 he became superintendent of the Louisiana Military Academy
Left when secessions began and declined a position in the Union War Department by Lincoln Sherman's Hesitance and Breakdown Met Lincoln in spring of 1861 and tried to convince him of the seriousness of the situation and found him unresponsive
“There is no doubt that Lincoln’s earliest impressions of Sherman were quite as unfavorable to Sherman as were Sherman’s early impressions of Lincoln.” - Alexander McClure, Pennsylvania journalist
Was appointed as a general and used his foster father's influence to bump him down to his desired position as a colonel in the regular army
Lincoln had promised Sherman that he would not be assigned to a command position
Assigned to command in Kentucky and the Department of Cumberland
Suffered a nervous breakdown and was relieved of command
Reassigned after rest to Grant's Department of Tennessee "You people of the South don't know what you are doing. This country will be drenched in blood, and God only knows how it will end. It is all folly, madness, a crime against civilization! You people speak so lightly of war; you don't know what you're talking about. War is a terrible thing! You mistake, too, the people of the North. They are a peaceable people but an earnest people, and they will fight, too. They are not going to let this country be destroyed without a mighty effort to save it... Besides, where are your men and appliances of war to contend against them? The North can make a steam engine, locomotive, or railway car; hardly a yard of cloth or pair of shoes can you make. You are rushing into war with one of the most powerful, ingeniously mechanical, and determined people on Earth—right at your doors. You are bound to fail. Only in your spirit and determination are you prepared for war. In all else you are totally unprepared, with a bad cause to start with. At first you will make headway, but as your limited resources begin to fail, shut out from the markets of Europe as you will be, your cause will begin to wane. If your people will but stop and think, they must see in the end that you will surely fail." Battle of Shiloh April 6, 1862 the Confederates led by Albert Sidney Johnston caught the Union troops by surprise
Made almost no preparations in fear that people would think he was paranoid and crazy again
Commanded the 5th Division, rallied them and made a retreat Fought bravely in the counterattack on April 7Shot twice with three horses shot from under him
Praised for his performance and proved himself
Promoted to major general of volunteers
"Before the battle of Shiloh, I was cast down by a mere newspaper assertion of 'crazy', but that single battle gave me new life, and I'm now in high feather." Sherman's Battles March to the Sea From Nov. 15, 1864 to Dec. 21, 1864
Began with Atlanta and ended with capture of Savannah
Concept of total war- destroying everything that could be useful to the enemy
Operated within enemy territory without supply or communication lines
Wanted to increase pressure on Lee's army in order to allow Grant to break the stalemate in Virginia
Commanded Military Division of the Mississippi and split his army into three groups
The armies that went with General Thomas to fight Hood
The Army of the Tennessee making up the right wing
The Army of Georgia making up the left wing
Sherman sent Lincoln a telegram offering him the city of Savannah as a Christmas present
Caused $100 million worth of destruction
People up North were so impressed by Sherman and his capture of Savannah that many felt that he should replace Grant as commander of the Union Army
"General Grant is a great general. I know him well. He stood by me when I was crazy, and I stood by him when he was drunk; and now, sir, we stand by each other always." Born in January 1824
Sister and father
passed away
Mother remarried
Moved to Jackson's Mill
3 weeks for West
Point preparation
Married twice Bull Run-Bee's forces were falling apart
-Henry House Hill
- "Look! There is Jackson
standing like a stonewall!
Rally behind the Virginians!"
-Jackson's men loved him
from this day on “Confederate General ‘Stonewall’ Thomas Jonathan Jackson.” American Civil War. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 Oct. 2012. <http://americancivilwar.com/south/stonewall_jackson.html>.
Jackson, Mary Anna. Memoirs of “Stonewall” Jackson. 1993 ed. Dayton: Morningside Inc., 1993. Print.
Johnson, Robert Underwood, and Clarence Clough Buel. Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based upon “The Century War Series.” New Jersey: Castle, 1982. Print.
“Lee and Grant.” Virginia Historical Society. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Oct. 2012. <http://www.vahistorical.org/lg/introduction.htm>.
McPherson, James M. This Mighty Scourge. New York: Oxford UP, 2007. Print.
Robert E. Lee. Historynet. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Oct. 2012. <http://www.historynet.com/robert-e-lee>.
Robertson, James I., Jr. The Stonewall Brigade. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1963. Print.
- - -. Stonewall Jackson--the Man, the Soldier, the Legend. New York: Macmillan Library Reference USA, 1997. Print.
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