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Daymonn and Devin

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lib hist

on 17 September 2015

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Transcript of Daymonn and Devin

Daymonn and Devin
The Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is an award given to those who showed great courage, honor, and sacrifice. Those people cared so much for others that they put themselves on the line to keep them safe. And when they do, they give it their all, no matter what challenge came their way.
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Walke engaged in a detached mission in support of minesweeping operations to clear the waters for entry of our heavy surface and amphibious forces preparatory to the invasion of Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 6 January 1945. Operating without gun support of other surface ships when 4 Japanese suicide planes were detected flying low overland to attack simultaneously, Comdr. Davis boldly took his position in the exposed wings of the bridge and directed control to pick up the leading plane and open fire. Alert and fearless as the Walke's deadly fire sent the first target crashing into the water and caught the second as it passed close over the bridge to plunge into the sea of portside, he remained steadfast in the path of the third plane plunging swiftly to crash the after end of the bridge structure. Seriously wounded when the craft struck, drenched with gasoline and immediately enveloped in flames, he conned the Walke in the midst of the wreckage; he rallied his command to heroic efforts; he exhorted his officers and men to save the ship and, still on his feet, saw the barrage from his guns destroy the fourth suicide bomber. With the fires under control and the safety of the ship assured, he consented to be carried below. Succumbing several hours later, Comdr. Davis by his example of valor and his unhesitating self-sacrifice, steeled the fighting spirit of his command into unyielding purpose in completing a vital mission. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.
For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty.
Medal Of Honor
BARNUM, HARVEY C., JR.
Army Staff Sgt. Salvatore Giunta
Giunta received the Medal of Honor on November 16, 2010 for his service in Afghanistan. He was the first living recipient of the medal from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. During an ambush, Giunta charged into enemy fire in an attempt to save a comrade
Army Staff Sgt. Clinton Romesha
Romesha received the Medal of Honor on February 11, 2013 for his service in Afghanistan. He was serving as a section leader during an attack by 300 enemy fighters in Kamdesh. Under heavy fire during the 12-hour battle, Romesha helped three wounded soldiers reach aid and recovered American casualties.
Heroically led his platoon against the enemy in Normandy, France, on 14, 16, and 23 June 1944. Although painfully wounded on the 14th near Orglandes and again on the 16th while spearheading an attack to establish a bridgehead across the Douve River, he refused medical aid and remained with his platoon. A week later, near Flottemanville Hague, he led an assault on a tactically important and stubbornly defended hill studded with tanks, antitank guns, pillboxes, and machinegun emplacements, and protected by concentrated artillery and mortar fire. As the attack was launched, 2d Lt. Butts, at the head of his platoon, was critically wounded by German machinegun fire. Although weakened by his injuries, he rallied his men and directed 1 squad to make a flanking movement while he alone made a frontal assault to draw the hostile fire upon himself. Once more he was struck, but by grim determination and sheer courage continued to crawl ahead. When within 10 yards of his objective, he was killed by direct fire. By his superb courage, unflinching valor and inspiring actions, 2d Lt. Butts enabled his platoon to take a formidable strong point and contributed greatly to the success of his battalion's mission.


John E. Butts
DAVIS, GEORGE FLEMING
FiNiSH
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