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Wine in Art – A study of how wine is painted in several artistic movements

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3 gel Galatsi

on 7 March 2014

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Transcript of Wine in Art – A study of how wine is painted in several artistic movements

Wine in Art
A study of how wine is painted
in several artistic movements

presentation made for the
Comenius multilateral project:

Wine: an European asset
Fauvism is the style of les Fauves (French for "the wild beasts"), a loose group of early twentieth-century Modern artists whose works emphasized in painterly qualities and strong color over the representational or realistic values retained by Impressionism.

Fauvism
André Derain
Drinker

Cubism is an avant-garde art movement pioneered by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso. Cubism has been considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century.
In Cubist artwork, objects are analyzed, broken up and reassembled in an abstracted form—instead of depicting objects from one viewpoint, the artist depicts the subject from a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context.

Cubism
Pablo Picasso
Guitar, Sheet music and Wine glass
Cubism
Georges Braque 

Georges Braque
Fruit dish
Rococo
Francois Boucher

Are They Thinking
about the Grapes?

The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Francois Boucher
Pastoral scene

by: 3 Geniko Lykeio Galatsi
March 2014

The wine harvest
Francisco José de Goya
Romanticism
Henri Matisse 

Realism
Neoclassicism
Still life with oranges
Henri Matisse
Post
Impressionism

The Seasons: Autumn (1896)
Autumn is represented as a playful figure wearing a wreath of chrysanthemums in her long auburn hair. She sits amid a rich tapestry of autumnal plants and gathers grapes from an abundant vine.
Completion Date: 1896
Technique: oil
Gallery: Private Collection

The Seasons: Autumn (1896)
Autumn is represented as a playful figure wearing a wreath of chrysanthemums in her long auburn hair. She sits amid a rich tapestry of autumnal plants and gathers grapes from an abundant vine.
Completion Date: 1896
Technique: oil
Gallery: Private Collection

Aubrey Beardsley
Modern Art Nouveau

Pablo Picasso 
Surrealism
Synthetic
Cubism
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Harvester
William-Adolphe Bouguereau
The term Realism originated in the 19th century, and defines the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, implausible, exotic and supernatural elements.
The popularity of realism grew with the introduction of photography, creating the desire for people to produce representations which look “objectively real.”
After the arrival of Impressionism and later movements the importance of precise illusionistic brushwork was downgraded .
Old Man with a glass of wine
Art
Nouveau
Popular during 1890–1910,
Art Nouveau
was inspired by natural forms and structures, not only in flowers and plants, but also in curved lines.
Alphonse (Alfons) Mucha
Art Nouveau
Alphonse (Alfons) Mucha
A Snare of Vintage
Bobo (Velazquez-Murillo)
Surrealism -
Pablo Picasso
- Still life
Surrealism -
Pablo Picasso
- Still life with large wine bottle

Rococo
Jean-Honoré Fragonard
Modern Art nouveau
Aubrey Beardsley
A Snare of Vintage
Romanticism
Francisco José de Goya
Still life with fruit, bottles, breads
Romanticism

Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix 

Bacchus
Expressionism

Edvard Munch

Brothel scene (Zum sussen Madel)

Expressionism
Edvard Munch

The day after
Edvard Munch
Expressionism
The wedding of the bohemian
(Munch Seated on the Far Left)
Post
Expressionism

Paul Klee
Mumon drunk falls into the chair
Fauvism
André Derain
Bacchus dance

Post Expressionism
Max Pechstein

Still Life with Mirror Clivia, Fruit and Jug

Still life (with clarinet)
Analytical Cubism
Georges Braque
Still Life with a Bunch of Grapes
Realism
Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet
Realism
Synthetic
Cubism

Pablo Picasso
Fruit vase and bunch of grapes
Rococo
Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Rococo was ornate and made strong usage of creamy,
pastel-like colors,
asymmetrical designs,
curves and gold.
Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.  
Painting the see saw
Pablo Picasso 
Bottle and Wine Glass on a Table
Cubism
Surrealism is a cultural movement that began in the early 1920 and developed out of the Dada activities during World War I..
The aim was to resolve the previously contradictory conditions of dream and reality. Leader was André Breton.
Zouan Miró
Surrealism
Bottle of wine
Pablo Picasso 
Surrealism
The wine bottle
Georges Braque
Still Life with Grapes
Synthetic Cubism
Georges Braque
Post Expressionism
Still life with fruits
Edvard Munch
Expressionism
Self-portrait with bottle of wine
Expressionism was a modernist movement, initially in poetry and painting, originating in Germany at the beginning of the 20th century.
Its typical trait is to present the world solely from a subjective perspective, distorting it radically for emotional effect in order to evoke moods or ideas.
Expressionist artists sought to express meaning or emotional experience rather than physical reality.
Impressionism
Gustave Caillebotte
Peaches , apples and grapes on a vine leaf
Pop Art
Pop art is an art movement that emerged in the mid-1950s in Britain and in the late 1950s in the United States.
Pop art presented a challenge to traditions of fine art by including imagery from popular culture.
Andy Warhol
Grapes
Pop Art
Andy Warhol
Grapes
Pop Art
Andy Warhol
After The Party
Romanticism originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century. Partly a reaction to the Industrial Revolution, it was also a revolt against the aristocratic social and political norms of the Age of Enlightenment and a reaction against the scientific rationalization of nature.
The movement validated strong emotion as an authentic source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as apprehension, horror and terror, and awe.

Training Grape Vines
Jean-François Millet
Realism
Realism
Jean-François Millet
Binding the grapevine
Honoré Daumier
Realism
MAN EATING OYSTERS AND WINE
Realism
Impressions from the vintage
Honoré Daumier
Realism
The Drinkers
Honoré Daumier
Realism
Édouard Manet
Chez le Pere Lathuille
Impressionism
Claude Monet
Fruit Basket with Apples and Grapes
Impressionism
Nicolae Vermont
Autumn Allegory (The Art and The Wine)
Impressionism
Paul Cézanne
Compotier Glass And Apples
Impressionism
Vincent
Van Gogh
Still Life with Apples Pears Lemons and Grapes
Divisionism
Georges-Pierre Seurat
Still life with grapes
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Caravaggio
Bacchus
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Caravaggio

Young Sick Bacchus

The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Caravaggio

Basket of fruit
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque

Pieter Paul Rubens

Bacchus
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Jan Steen

Wine is a mocker

Sergey Solomko
Modern Art Nouveau

Bacchus
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
Baroque
Diego Velazquez

Triumph of Bacchus
Post
Expressionism
Billy Childish
Drunk
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque

Juan Bautista Espinosa

Still life with grapes
Baroque

Guido Reni
Drinking Bacchus

The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Jan Steen
Drunk woman

Eduard von Gebhardt
Romanticism
A young woman
with a Wineglass
Juan Gris
Bottle, Wine Glass and Fruit Bowl
Cubism
Hangover
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Post
Impressionism

The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque

Pieter de Hooch

Man Offering a Glass of Wine to a Woman

Realism
Julius LeBlanc Stewart
The toast
Umberto Boccioni
The Drinker
Cubism
The Drinkers (after Daumier)
Vincent van Gogh
Post
Impressionism

Vineyards with a View of Auvers
Vincent van Gogh
Post - Impressionism
Red Vineyards at Arles
Vincent van Gogh
Post - Impressionism
Old Vineyard with Peasant Woman
Vincent van Gogh
Post
Impressionism

Novgorodians
Pyotr Konchalovsky
Post - Impressionism
Pogrom of wine shop
Ivan Vladimirov
Realism
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Jacob Jordaens
The King Drinks

Baroque
Post Expressionism
Marc Chagall
Man at table
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Gabriel Metsu

A Woman Drawing Wine from a Barrel
Expressionism
Amedeo Modigliani
Man with
a Glass of Wine
Expressionism
Josef Herman
Vineyards in the Autumn
Expressionism
Josef Herman
Pruning the Vines
Divisionism
Henri Martin
Laborers Prepare the Vines in Quercy
Divisionism developed in 19th century. It is also called Chromoluminarism and its style is defined by the separation of colors into individual dots or patches which interacts optically.
By requiring the viewer to combine the colors optically instead of physically mixing pigments, divisionists believed they were achieving the maximum luminosity scientifically possible.
Cultivation of the Vines
Henri Martin
Post - Impressionism
The vines in Saint Clair
Post
Impressionism

Theo van Rysselberghe
Karl Bryullov
Romanticism
Grape Harvest Celebration
Impressionism
Pierre-Auguste Renoir
The grape pickers at lunch
Impressionism
Joaquín Sorolla
Grape Harvest
Pop Art
Patrick Caulfield
Wine Glasses
Impressionism
Lovis Corinth
Woman with a Glass of Wine
Impressionism
Salvador Dali
Glass of Wine and Boat
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque
Johannes
Vermeer

The glass of wine
Baroque is an artistic style which began around 1600 in Rome, Italy and spread to most of Europe.
It used exaggerated motion and clear, easily interpreted detail to produce drama, tension, exuberance, and grandeur.
The popularity and success of the Baroque style was encouraged by both the Roman Catholic Church to represent religious themes and the aristocracy who used the dramatic style of Baroque art as a means of impressing visitors and expressing triumph, power and control.
Hieronymus Bosch
The Garden of Earthly Delights
Renaissance
Renaissance
Still Life
Jan van Eyck
Zwei Satyrn
Rubens
Baroque
Baroque
Michelangelo
Boy with a Basket of Fruit
Renaissance
Bacchanal
Titian
Renaissance marks the period of European history
at the close of the Middle Ages
and the rise
of the Modern world.
It represents
a cultural rebirth
from the 14th
through the middle
of the 17th centuries.
One of the distinguishing features of Renaissance art
was its development of highly realistic linear perspective.
Renaissance
Bacchus and ariadne
Titian
Last Supper
El Greco
Renaissance
Supper at Emmaus
Titian
Renaissance
St John the Evangelist
El Greco
Renaissance
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
The Rococo developed in the early part of the 18th century in Paris, as a reaction against the grandeur, symmetry and strict regulations of the Baroque.  
Roccoco
Rococo art and architecture in such
a way was ornate
and made strong usage
of creamy, pastel-like colors, asymmetrical designs, curves and gold.
Unlike the more politically focused Baroque, the Rococo had more playful
and often witty artistic themes. Towards the end of the 18th century, Rococo started to fall out of fashion, and it was largely supplanted by the Neoclassic style.
Baroque

Guido Reni

The boy Bacchus

Neoclassicism
Two naked women and still life

André Derain

Neoclassicism
The youth of Bacchus
William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Neoclassicism was an art movement of the 18th century, reviving the styles and spirit of classic antiquity.
Like Romanticism it was initially a reaction against the excesses of the then-dominant Baroque and Rococo styles, thus it is often described as the opposed counterpart of Romanticism.
Impressionism originated in 19th-century with a group of Paris-based artists who where radicals in their time by violating the rules of academic painting.
They constructed their pictures from freely brushed colours that took precedence over lines and contours.
By recreating the sensation in the eye that views the subject, rather than delineating the details of the subject, and by creating a welter of techniques and forms, Impressionism is a precursor of various painting styles, including Post-Impressionism, Fauvism, and Cubism.
Post-Impressionists extended Impressionism
while rejecting
its limitations:
they continued using vivid colours,
often thick application of paint, and real-life
subject matter,
but they were
more inclined to emphasize geometric forms,
to distort form
for expressive effect, and to use unnatural or arbitrary colour.
Impressionism
Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Still life with grapes
Impressionism
Pierre-Auguste Renoir
Glass of wine
Post-expressionism is used to describe a variety of art movements after the 1st world war which were influenced by expressionism but defined themselves through rejecting its aesthetic.
WIKI PAINTINGS
Source of our research was:
VISUAL ART ENCYCLOPEDIA
Realism
Realism
Georgios Jakobides
Dish with grapes
Realism
Georgios Jakobides
Dish with grapes
Expressionism
Panos Fidakis
Still life
Still life
George Bouzianis
Expressionism
Nikos Eggonopoulos
Surrealism
Drinking couple
Spyros Papaloukas
Post
Impressionism

Archontariki lavra Mount Athos

Post Expressionism
Alekos Fasianos
Still Life


Post Expressionism
Alekos Fasianos
Still Life

Yiannis Tsarouchis
Autumn
New Realism
Yiannis Tsarouchis
Autumn
New Realism
Yiannis Tsarouchis
Autumn
New Realism
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