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Literary devices in Tuesdays with Morrie

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Kayla Troxell

on 13 December 2013

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Transcript of Literary devices in Tuesdays with Morrie

Literary Devices in

Metaphor
Personification
Italics
"a figure of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is used in place of another to suggest a likeness or analogy between them (Metaphor)"
“The first wave says, ‘You don’t understand! We’re all going to crash! All of us waves are going to be nothing! Isn’t it terrible?’“
“The second wave says, ‘No, you don’t understand. You’re not a wave, you’re part of the ocean.’ “
“Part of the ocean,” he says. “Part of the ocean.”
(Albom 179-180)
In this story, the first wave embodies Morrie and the ocean- life
The wave crashing onto the shore represents Morrie's impending death
Just like the little wave, Morrie is fearful of dying but is comforted by the thought that he will never truly be gone
Morrie uses this story to symbolize his beliefs about reincarnation, how he will live on in nature even after death
Tuesdays with Morrie
The Story of the Little Wave
179-180

Works Cited
Albom, Mitch.
Tuesdays with Morrie: An Old Man, a Young Man,


"Metaphor."
Merriam-Webster
. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 12



"Personification."
Dictionary.com
. Dictionary.com, n.d. Web. 12


“I heard a nice little story the other day,” Morrie says. He closes his eyes for a moment and I wait.

“Okay. The story is about a little wave, bobbing along in the ocean, having a grand old time. He’s enjoying the wind and the fresh air — until he notices the other waves in front of him, crashing against the shore. “

“‘My God, this is terrible,’ the wave says ‘Look what’s going to happen to me!’”

“Then along comes another wave. It sees the first wave, looking grim, and it says to him, ‘Why do you look so sad?’ “

“The first wave says, ‘You don’t understand! We’re all going to crash! All of us waves are going to be nothing! Isn’t it terrible?’ “

“The second wave says, ‘No, you don’t understand. You’re not a wave, you’re part of the ocean.’ “

I smile. Morrie closes his eyes again.

“Part of the ocean,” he says. “Part of the ocean.” I watch him breathe, in and out, in and out."

(Albom 179-180)
"the attribution of a personal nature or human characteristics to something nonhuman (Personification)"
“Okay. The story is about a little wave, bobbing along in the ocean, having a grand old time. He’s enjoying the wind and the fresh air — until he notices the other waves in front of him, crashing against the shore. “
“‘My God, this is terrible,’ the wave says ‘Look what’s going to happen to me!’”
“Then along comes another wave. It sees the first wave, looking grim, and it says to him, ‘Why do you look so sad?’“
The wave is given human-like qualities such as the ability to speak, see, and possess emotion


“'I heard a nice little story the other day,' Morrie says. He closes his eyes for a moment and I wait (Albom 179)."
The entire passage is italicized
Mitch, throughout the book, uses italics to signify important events and conversations that hold relevance and meaning
As Morrie's death approaches, Mitch references this conversation to share Morrie's outlook and spiritual beliefs regarding the afterlife
Metaphor's Effect on the Story
Metaphors simplify abstract concepts
The simple illustration of the waves gives the reader insight into Morrie's beliefs about life after death
The comparison allows the audience to understand Morrie's perspective
Personification's Effect on the Story
Personification provides a method of breaking down an idea or message to make it more comprehendable to the reader
Enables the reader to relate and connect to Morrie's situation more easily through the use of human traits like emotion
Im Alive
Andrew Beeco, Kayla Troxell, Haley Troxell
and Life's Greatest Lesson
. New York: Doubleday, 1997. Print.
Dec. 2013. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/metaphor>.
Dec. 2013. <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/personification>.
(Albom 179-180)
Mitch used italics to emphasize the significance and magnitude of Morrie's story and it's relevance to the entireity of the book
Mitch wanted the audience to realize how pivotal the conversation was and that the wave's story held meaning
Italics continued
Full transcript