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Laptop Use During Lecture

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Nadia D

on 7 January 2015

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Transcript of Laptop Use During Lecture

Background
Ideas
Ideas
Ideas
Laptop Use During Lecture
Hypothesis 1
If you look at a biology class, then you will find less people with laptops and a lower percentage of people with laptops on non-school related sites
Hypothesis 2
We hypothesize that if students are allowed to use their laptop in class, then students in
close proximity
to the
front of the class
will:
be less likely to use laptops
be less likely to be on non-school related sites
Hypothesis 1 Predictions
Not much research specifically on the subject
Researchers agree that nature of class and structure of class effect the usage of laptops during lecture (Hembrooke & Gay, 2003) (Fried, 2008)

Our predictions based on thoughts that biology classes are more memorization and definition based and thus students will miss more information if not paying attention than in concept based classes like anthropology
Notes
Ideas
Ideas
Ideas
Methods
The Faux Student
Prediction 1
Students in closer proximity to the front will be less likely to use laptops

Very little or no research has been done directly comparing these two variables
Students near front = more direct interaction with teacher = more likely to selectively pay attention to teacher = Less likely to use a laptop
Prediction 2
Students in close proximity to the front will be less likely to use laptops for non-school purposes
Research shows a positive correlation between sitting in the front and class participation, as well as with academic performance
Instructor (and student) sight of laptop screen as a deterrent to slacking
More involved, motivated students = less inclined to cyberslack = more inclined to sit in front
Prediction 1
More students will be using laptops in Anthropology 101 than in Biology 172
Prediction 2
Anthropology 101 will have a larger percentage of laptop users on non-class related material than Biology 172
Number of computers
Percentage on non school related sites
Scan every 10 minutes during lecture
Separate based on row number and
quadrants
Once counted, never counted again
Laptop-Free Zones
Laptop-Free Zones Results
Aguilar-Roca, N. M., Williams, A. E., & O'Dowd, D. K. (2012). The impact of laptop-free zones on student performance and attitudes in large lectures. Computers & Education, 59(4), 1300-1308. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2012.05.002
Aguilar-Roca, N. M., Williams, A. E., & O'Dowd, D. K. (2012). The impact of laptop-free zones on student performance and attitudes in large lectures. Computers & Education, 59(4), 1300-1308. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2012.05.002
Background
Aguilar-Roca, N. M., Williams, A. E., & O'Dowd, D. K. (2012). The impact of laptop-free zones
on student performance and attitudes in large lectures. Computers & Education, 59(4), 1300-1308. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2012.05.002

Barak, M., Lipson, A., & Lerman, S. (2006). Wireless laptops as means for promoting active
learning in large lecture halls. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 38(3),
245.
Carrie B. Fried, In-class laptop use and its effects on student learning, Computers & Education,
Volume 50, Issue 3, April 2008, Pages 906-914.

Cengiz Gulek, J., & Demirtas, H. (2005). Learning with technology: The impact of laptop use on
student achievement. The journal of technology, learning and assessment, 3(2).

Fewkes, Aaron; McCabe, Mike (2012). Facebook: Learning Tool or Distraction? Journal of
Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 28(3), p92.

Gerow, J. E., Galluch, P. S., & Thatcher, J. B. (2010). To Slack or Not to Slack: Internet Usage
in the Classroom. JITTA : Journal of Information Technology Theory and
Application, 11(3), 5-23.
References
Mitra, A., Lenzmeier, S., Steffensmeier, T., Avon, R., Qu, N., & Hazen, M. (2000). Gender and
computer use in an academic institution: Report from a longitudinal study. Journal of
Educational Computing Research, 23(1), 67-84. doi:10.2190/FC2G-TCUV-XKW8-
W32G

Terrion, J., & Aceti, V. (2012). Perceptions of the effects of clicker technology on student
learning and engagement: A study of freshmen Chemistry students. Research In Learning Technology, 20(2), 1-11.

Wurst, C., Smarkola, C., & Gaffney, M. (2008). Ubiquitous laptop usage in higher education:
Effects on student achievement, student satisfaction, and constructivist measures in honors and traditional classrooms. Computers and Education, 51(4), 1766-1783. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2008.05.006

Doyle, A.-B. (1973). Listening to distraction: A developmental study of selective
attention. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 15(1), 100–115. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0022096573901343

Eriksen, B. A. (1974). Effects of noise letters upon the identification of a target letter
in a nonsearch task. Perception and Psychophysics, 16(1), 143–149. Retrieved from
http://link.springer.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/article/10.3758%2FBF03203267#
Kok, A. (2000). Age-related changes in involuntary and voluntary attention as reflected
in components of the event-related potential (ERP). Biological Psychology, 54(1-3), 107–
143. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/science/article/pii/S0301051100000545

Plude, D. J., & Enns, J. T. (1994). The development of selective attention: A life-span
overview. Acta Psychologica,86(2-3), 227–272. Retrieved from
http://www.sciencedirect.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/science/article/pii/0001691894900043

Weksler, M. E., & Weksler, B. B. (2012). The epidemic of distraction. Gerontology, 58(5), doi: 10.1159/000338331

Fried, C. B. (2008). In-class laptop use and its effects on student learning. Computers & Education, 50(3), doi: 0.1016/j.compedu.2006.09.006

Kay, R. H., & Lauricella, S. (2011). Gender differences in the use of laptops in higher education: a formative analysis. Journal of Educational Computing Research, 44(3), doi: 10.2190/EC.44.3.f

Helene, H., & Gay, G. (2003). The laptop and the lecture: The effects of multitasking in learning environments. Journal of Computing in Higher Education,15(1), doi: 10.1007/BF02940852

Fernandes, Amanda Careena, Jinyan Huang, and Vince Rinaldo (2011). Does Where a Student Sits Really Matter?--the Impact of Seating Locations on Student Classroom Learning. International Journal of Applied Educational Studies 10.1: 66.
Significance
Scan and focal screening
Excel table with row #, quadrant, usage of nonschool related website
provides information for students to improve academically
to understand the characteristics of students who use laptops in class
provide information on class proximity
non-class related sites can distract other students

Cornell University Study
students in an upper division communications class separated in 2 groups
Group 1: students allowed to use laptops in class
Group 2: students only allowed to use paper and pencil during lecture
Results: distraction and multitasking
higher percentage of students received A's who used paper instead of a laptop
biology lecture divided into zones
Helene, H., & Gay, G. (2003). The laptop and the lecture: The effects of multitasking in learning environments. Journal of Computing in Higher Education,15(1), doi: 10.1007/BF02940852
By Nadia D., Ben Yoon, Jesse Werth, Kevin Sutter
Full transcript