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Types of Persuasion

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by

James Tilton

on 25 March 2014

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Transcript of Types of Persuasion

Persuasion
Three Types
Ethos
Pathos
Logos

Ethos
You should listen to what I say because who I am or because of who I know.
You should listen to what I say because it is ethical, e.g. right, just, fair, honest, true.
Often used by experts, but can be used by anyone who knows the difference between right and wrong.
Drinking underage is not just illegal. It is wrong.
As someone who cares about you, I really think you should stop drinking.
Examples
Dr. MacAvoy recently released a study saying that underage drinking is the leading cause of death and depression in high school students.
Your Turn
Using one of the articles from yesterday or an appeal to your own experiences, write a paragraph using an appeal to ethos in an attempt to persuade your reader to view technology as either positive or negative.
Pathos
An appeal to emotion as an attempt at persuasion
The writer or speaker will make the audience feel their way into changing their mind, often through sadness, humor, fear, or some other emotional connection
Personal stories (often tragic) are useful here.
Example
I loved my brother. He was my
best friend. We did everything together...
until he was killed by a teenage drive coming home drunk from a party.
Did you know that underage drinking can land you in jail? Do you really want to know what jail is like before you even graduate?
Your Turn
Write a paragraph using an appeal to pathos (or emotion) to convince your reader that technology is either good or bad. Make sure this paragraph is taking the same side as your previous paragraph. If you are having trouble, those of you who think technology is bad might think of a situation where it technology is frustrating or angering. This would be especially powerful if we've all been there before. Those of you who think technology is good might think of a situation where not having technology would be scary or sad.
Logos
An appeal to logic or facts
Often features "If...then..." statements or variations thereof
Numbers and statistics are an important of logos
Sometimes this logic is flawed or incorrect
Examples
If you drink, you are 75% more likely to develop liver problems.
Those who drink an average of a beer a day often gain up to twenty pounds.
Your Turn
Write a paragraph using an appeal to logic in defense of your position regarding technology. This can include statistics, facts, or "if...then..." statements. You can use your phone for research.
Now let's see if we can recognize
these three types of persuasion...

In a powerful opening sentence, tell me what your paragraph is going to prove.
Give me the credentials and opinion of Expert #2 (Must agree with expert #1)
Give me a one sentence quote from Expert #1 and another sentence explaining the way this quote proves your topic sentence.
Give me a one sentence quote from Expert #2 and another sentence explaining the way this quote proves your topic sentence.
Recap the paragraph, reminding your reader how both the experts confirmed what you stated in your topic sentence.
Give me the credentials and opinion of Expert #1 (Remember, this can be you.)
Open your paragraph with a topic sentence that connects your last paragraph with this one and that explains what this paragraph will be talking about.
Create a situation which demonstrates the importance/intrusion of technology.
Ask the audience, "How would you feel?" Then explain how you think most people would feel and why this feeling would prove that you are right.
Create another situation which demonstrates the importance or intrusion of technology. Often could start with "Or imagine..."
Ask the audience, "How would you feel?" Then explain how you think most people would feel and why this feeling would prove that you are right.
Close your paragraph with a single sentence which recaps the highlights of your paragraph and shows these main points prove your point regarding technology.
In a single sentence, connect this paragraph to the previous one, and subtly explain the purpose of this paragraph.
Give me a statistic which supports your view of technology. You may need to look on your phone.
In a sentence or two, explain how this statistic proves your point.
Give me an "If...Then..." statement which supports your view of technology.
In a sentence or two, explain how the previous sentence proves your point.
Introduce your paragraph by saying something along the lines of... "Not everyone agrees with this idea, however."
"For example, some people think.... (one example of different opinion)."
In a sentence or two, tell your reader why this opinion is wrong or incomplete.
"Still others believe...(another example of different opinion)."
In a sentence or two, tell your reader why this opinion is wrong or incomplete.
Conclude your paragraph with a single sentence that hits the big points and shows how they prove your main point regarding technology.
Recap your paragraph, connecting the highlights to the big point you are making.
Full transcript