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RHETORICAL DEVICES IN SHAKESPEARE

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by

Amy Hayes

on 12 February 2014

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Transcript of RHETORICAL DEVICES IN SHAKESPEARE

ACT I
THE SOUND
OF THINGS
The repetition of consonant sounds within two or more words of a phrase, sentence, or longer passage.
CONSONANCE
The repetition of vowel sounds within two or more words of a phrase, sentence, or longer passage.
ASSONANCE
Romeo:
Ay
m
i
ne own fortune in m
y
misery.
The repetition of an important word or words at the beginning of successive sentences, phrases, or clauses.
ANAPHORA
Benvolio: Be rul'd by me:
forget to think
of her.

Romeo: O teach me how I should
forget to think
!
The repetition of letter sounds at the beginning of words within two or more words of a phrase, sentence, or longer passage.
ALLITERATION
Romeo: Ay
m
ine own fortune in
m
y
m
isery.


The repetition of words or phrases at the end of successive sentences.
RHETORICAL DEVICES IN R&J
alliteration
assonance
consonance

anaphora
epistrophe
EPISTROPE
Comparisons
antithesis
metaphor
simile

The use of contrast in language to bring out a contrast in thought, usually expressed in opposites.
ANTITHESIS
Juliet: If he be married,
My
grave
is like to be my
wedding bed
.
What does this contrast do?
What happens to her if he's already married?
What happens to her if he
marries her?
also what?
simile
An exaggerated, powerful metaphoric phrase that combines highly unlikely ideas or objects in ways that could never be literally true.
CATACHRESIS
Mercutio: Come,
we burn daylight
, ho!
It is impossible to burn daylight, something that has no substance.
The catachresis means that
Romeo and Mercutio are
wasting time.
Full transcript