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Writing on unfamiliar texts..

Show understanding of significant aspects of unfamiliar written text(s) through close reading, using supporting evidence
by

Tynneale Rimmer

on 6 August 2013

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Transcript of Writing on unfamiliar texts..

but if you dig deeper and look more closely at a poem you will see that a lot more lies beneath the surface...
.. need to show an understanding of
purposes
and
audiences,

ideas,
language features,
and/or
structures
based on the close reading of significant aspects of unfamiliar short written text(s) and extracts from longer text(s).

When we write an essay on a written text we...
This means that we need to look at
what
a text is saying....
Grief on the Whanganui River
Water; calm, rippled, rain stippled,
is a mirror reaching from
the frigid mountains to the sea.
Steep papa cliffs, speckled shell-rock
willow boughs, ferns
stare up from the water.
Waterfalls, rapids,
bursts of bird song resound
and all the while
the bushclad land stands proud
in a cloak of red rata.
It towers above travellers
hopes they'll understand
for here, the red of the rata means battles, bloodshed, bitterness
on river and land.
and
how
a text is saying it...
when we think about
what
a poem is saying, we think about what is on the
surface
of the poem...this is what we see and understand when we first approach it....

got it?
when we think about the
what
and the
how
of a poem, we can also start to think about
why
the poem has been written...

lets think of it like this..
the
what
refers to the words the poet has written...
the
how
refers to the
techniques
the poem has used
and the
why
are the messages, themes and ideas of the poem...
that sit beneath the surface

when we write about a poem, we need to
link
the
what

how
and
why...

how?!
it's easier to understand and write about a poem if you...
'close read' it!
simile
metaphor
alliteration
hyperbole
Onomatopoeia
symbolism
tone
theme
Personification
today we are going to look at poetry!
yusssss!
think about the
what
and
why
what is it about?
what is its purpose?
what is its tone?
who is the intended audience?
Is it about a person, a place, a character, an event, or an object?
Does the poet want to persuade you?
Entertain you? Amuse you? Inform you? Warn you? What is the main theme or message?
or the 'why'
Is the tone serious? Persuasive? Angry? Humorous? Emotive?
Who is the poem aimed at? What age? Gender? Ethnicity? A certain kind of person?
First you need to read the poem quietly to yourself.
then read it again!
Do you understand all of the words?
If not, use this!
or this..
now think about the
how...
What words has the poet
chosen?
Look at the
syntax,
or the word order and structure of the poem
Look at the
language
the poet has chosen to get his idea across
Is the vocabulary simple? Complex? Do they use jargon? Slang? Is it formal or colloquial? Are there contractions?
How do they use punctuation? Are there lots of these.. ??? or these !!! or these () or these ""
Can you see patterns?
Is there repetition of phrasing, rhymes, or sentence structure?
Did the poet use sound effects like
alliteration,

assonance,

consonance,

onomatopoeia?
Did they use
rhythm
or
rhyme?
The poet probably used
figurative language
to help get his ideas across...
These are some examples of figurative language...
Imagery
Simile
Metaphor
Extended metaphor
Personification
Euphemism
Pun
Cliche
Symbol
Hyperbole
now you need to highlight and annotate those language techniques..look for clever use of language..poets do that very well!
If you want to get to the
why
or the
main messages
in the text think about the emotion the poem created, or the reaction you had to it...
Now you have
close read
the poem you might understand the
meaning.
What is the poem saying to you?
So! Once you have
read
the poem, read it again, and looked at the
what

why
and
how,
you are ready to
write
about it!

But that's another challenge...
Full transcript