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Figurative Language Project

This project is sucking the life out of me.

Zach Hansen

on 28 September 2012

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Transcript of Figurative Language Project

Figurative Language Figurative Language- Language using
figures of speech. Examples of Figurative Language-
Connotation Simile- A comparison of two different things
using the words "like" or "as." Metaphor- Comparison of two things
without using the words "like" or "as." Personification- Giving living characteristics to
a non-living object. Oxymoron: Combining two things that don't
belong together in an expression. Examples: Simile: Her face was round and red like a tomato. His smile was as dazzling as the sun. The pain in his arm hurt like he had been shot. The hot sauce was fire in my mouth.
The book was a black hole, sucking in all my interest on the subject.
The house was a disaster waiting to happen. Metaphor My pencil ran across the paper.
My arm cried out in pain.
The trees whistled in the wind Personification "Cold Chilis"
"A Fine Mess"
"Amazingly Normal" Oxymoron: Onomatopoeia: Using words to
represent noises or sounds. Assonance: The repetition of vowel
sounds in a sentence. Alliteration: Repetition of initial consonant
sounds in a sentence. Pun: A joke exploiting the different
meanings of a word or fact. Examples: Onomatopoeia:
BOOM!! Assonance: Alliteration:
Silly Sam stayed sober seven sordid days.
Mary made many milky milkshakes.
Nine naked narwhals needed new Nikes. Pun:
Did you hear about the optometrist who fell into a lens grinder
and made a spectacle of himself?
Santa’s helpers are subordinate Clauses.
The best way to communicate with a fish is to drop them a line. Repetition: The repeating of words
to emphasize a concept. Parallelism:
When a sentence has a similar parallel and grammatical structure. Hyperbole: The use of exaggeration
as a figure of speech. Allusion: A figure of speech making a
reference to a person, place, or event. Connotation: The tone of a word, can
be positive or negative.

Apostrophe: When an author directs
speech towards an inanimate
object. Examples: Repetition:
The plane flew higher, and higher, and higher, until it couldn't possibly fly anymore.
All the racers ran, and ran, and ran, as fast as they possibly could.
He felt that the show was making him
stupider, and stupider, and stupider,
by the minute. Parallelism:
I play all day, clean all day, and sleep all day!
I can get to school on time, get to practice on time, and go to bed on time.
"Buy a bucket of chicken and have a barrel of fun."
(Advertising slogan for Kentucky Fried Chicken) Apostrophe:
"Is this a dagger I see before me?"
Why do you mock me, you dumb rock?!?
"O eloquent, just, and mighty Death!"
-Sir Walter Raleigh Hyperbole:
I had a million things to do.
I have a ton of homework!
His brain is the size of a pea. Allusion:
Finding her would be like finding Nemo all over again!
The shoe fit as if the girl was Cinderella.
I was surprised his nose didn't grow
like Pinocchio! Connotation:
Slender vs. Bony
Fat vs. Large
Old vs. Elderly Metonymy: A figure of speech in which one word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated Synecdoche: Substituting a part for a whole, or a whole for a part. Final Examples: Synechdoche:
"Wheels," when talking about a car.
"Bread," when referring to food.
The fins darted around the ocean floor. (The word "Fins" meaning "Fish")
Metonymy The White House has come up with a new set of tax laws!
"Lend me your ears!" -Julius Caesar
The Giants made 5 touchdowns in the first 30
minutes! "Hear the mellow wedding bells" -Edgar Allen Poe
"It beats, as it sweeps, as it cleans!" - Vacuum slogan
I say I'll eat hay, when I really mean no way!
Full transcript