Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Sensory Systems

A review of receptor cells and the sensory systems (touch, vision, hearing, taste, smell, & balance) with a concentration on the eye and ear.
by

Brandon Poe

on 13 September 2015

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Sensory Systems

Sensory



Systems

The Five Senses
Olfaction
Somatosensation
Vision
Audition
touch
pressure
itch
vibration
tickle
temperature
pain
proprioception
The Sixth Sense
Equilibrium
How do we sense the world around us?
Photo credit: http://sweetsistergina.typepad.com/joyful_purpose/2007/05/index.html
Photo credit:
http://www.school-for-champions.com/science/static_sparks.htm
Adaptation
Transduction
Graded potentials in the dendritic endings of a sensory neuron are called generator potentials.

Specialized cells that transduce sensory information have graded potentials that are called receptor potentials.
Rapidly-adapting receptors signal change in stimuli.
Slowly-adapting can monitor persistent stimuli.
Threshold/Sensitivity
Sensory stimuli are some representation of energy in the external environment
light
sound waves
vibration
chemical bonds
Transduction is the transformation of
energy into the electrochemical signal
of the action potential
What causes a neuron
to start an action potential?
Receptor potentials cause the release of neurotransmitter from receptor cells in a graded fashion.
The stronger the stimulus, the more neurotransmitter is released.
Generator or receptor potentials degrade so that signals don't persist.
Do you feel the clothes on your body?
Receptive Field
The area where a stimulus is sensed on the receptor surface
Photo credit: http://www.neurobiography.info/teaching/lecture_handout.php?lectureid=2
Gustation
salty
sour
sweet
bitter
umami
Types of Receptors
free nerve endings
encapsulated endings
separate receptor cells
exteroreceptor
interoreceptor
proprioreceptor
mechanoreceptor
thermoreceptor
photoreceptor
chemoreceptor
nociceptor
osmoreceptor
Cellular
Location
Transduction
Sensory receptors can be classified in three ways.
Two are about structure and one is about function.
1
2
3
Classification based on the cellular structure, or what can be seen under the microscope.
Classification based on the position of the receptor in relation to the stimuli that it senses.
Classification based on the type of stimuli that they detect and transduce into a neural signal.
Photo credit: (c) Beuna Vista Pictures
The Sixth Sense
[H+]
[Na+]
Real
What type of neuron, by shape, is found in a sensory ganglion?

A) Unipolar
B) Bipolar
C) Tripolar
D) Multipolar
Which aspect of taste is a sense of H+ concentration?

A) sour
B) sweet
C) bitter
D) sweet
What type of receptor cell is specialized for pain transduction?

A) mechanoreceptor
B) thermoreceptor
C) nociceptor
D) photoreceptor
What type of receptor cell is only found in the eye?

A) mechanoreceptor
B) thermoreceptor
C) nociceptor
D) photoreceptor
What sub-modality of taste is sensitive to the acidity of a substance?

A) Sweet
B) Salty
C) Sour
D) Savory
Which type of receptor is responsible for transduction of sound stimuli?

A) Photoreceptor
B) Mechanoreceptor
C) Chemoreceptor
D) Osmoreceptor
Which of these cranial nerves is responsible for relaying taste information into the brain?

A) Olfactory (I)
B) Trigeminal (V)
C) Glossopharyngeal (IX)
D) Hypoglossal (XII)
Image source: http://www.unmc.edu/physiology/Mann/mann4b.html
Image source: http://f1000.com/prime/reports/b/1/58
Image source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_skin
^
Image source: http://www.pdpics.com/photo/1440-bitter-gourd-squash-cut/
Image source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/infomofo/4386457342
Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gray938.png
All images from CNX Anatomy & Physiology. OpenStax College. Sept 1, 2015. http://cnx.org/contents/14fb4ad7-39a1-4eee-ab6e-3ef2482e3e22@7.28:1/Preface unless otherwise noted
NOTE: I've mispoken. Cis-retinal is changed to trans-retinal by the photon.
Full transcript