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Being and becoming an effective, inclusive teacher for SEN

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Georgina Spry

on 18 January 2018

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Transcript of Being and becoming an effective, inclusive teacher for SEN

Being and becoming an effective, inclusive teacher for learners with
special educational needs and disabilities
The central question
Professional Development for new
and experienced teachers
Now and in the future, how do
I develop my skill and confidence as an
inclusive teacher of learners with
Special Educational Needs and Disabilities?
Georgina Spry
Structure of the Lecture

1. Why is it important to ask the question
Now and in the future, how do I develop my skill and confidence as an inclusive teacher of learners with
Special Educational Needs and Disabilities?

NC Statutory Inclusion Statement
2014 Children's and Families Act
The global dimension
The values dimension
2. What does inclusion mean and look
like in a primary classroom?

Small inclusion or big inclusion?
The deficit model of SEND and its impact
The capacity model of SEND and its impact.
The option to think differently
3. What are the complexities of
inclusive practice in the current context?

The dilemma of difference
4. Practical interlude
Models of effective inclusive practice?


5. Moving forward in your professional
development.
What is most likely to deepen your
effectiveness as an inclusive teachers?
Department of Education (2013) The National Curriculum in England:
Framework Document. London: DfE, p.8

Low quality teaching is not acceptable

1.24

‘Special educational provision is underpinned by high quality teaching and is compromised by anything less.’

The new Code of Practice 2015

 
Early years providers, schools and colleges should know precisely where children and young people with SEN are in their learning and development. They should:
  
have high ambitions and set stretching targets for them
 
track their progress towards these goals
 
ensure that the approaches used are based on the best possible evidence and are having the required impact on progress

The new Code of Practice 2015

The resistance/compliance
dilemma
Questioning
Deconstructing
Critical-theorising
Resisting
Refusing
Complying with what is
regulated
Full compliance
Wise compliance
Partial compliance

Compliance with our own
values and belief system
Department of Education (2013) The National Curriculum in England:
Framework Document. London: DfE, p.8

Lone perfectionists won't build inclusive practice

Inclusive practice depends on collaboration,
teamwork, co-operation

Inclusive teaching is built from experimentation,
innovation, transformation. Room for error is important
for everyone.

An inclusive education system is one that recognises the
factors outside the class teachers' influence and
develops policies that address inequalities holistically

Don't limit me !
Identify key features of what are setting limitations
What would lead teachers to make this kind
of pedagogic choice as the way to secure 'inclusion?'
The term SEND tends to trigger deficit discourses
This is a legacy of the past and of the language
of current legislation (Graham, 2007)

What the learner CANNOT do
What the learner HAS NOT got
What the learner NEEDS
What we need to COMPENSATE for
What needs to be ADDED or MADE DIFFERENT in the teaching/learning approach
How the learner is DIFFERENT from the NORM
A FOCUS ON IMPAIRMENT
An alternative is capability discourse

What the learner CAN do
What the learner CAN CONTRIBUTE
Needs in COMMON with OTHER LEARNERS
A FOCUS ON THE LEARNER
Tends to lead to
special, separate,
segregated classroom
responses
Tends to trigger
more participative
practices
The recognition dilemma
On the one hand
we must
recognise
and respond to
impairment

On the other hand
we must recognise
and respond to
capabilities
The special and common dilemma (Florian, 2007)
On the one hand
we must recognise
when something DIFFERENT
and EXTRA needs to be put
in place.
On other hand we
must be aware of when
developments to our UNIVERSAL PROVISION might be the most
effective route to inclusion
We have the option to
think
and hence
practice
in ways that resist dominant discourses

The Inclusion Statement in the National Curriculum (DfE, 2013
)
In part, being an effective (inclusive) professional teacher depends
on our ability to manage dilemmas and balance contradictory stances
for the good of our learners
IMPORTANT POINT
During your development as an inclusive teacher
(which will never end) it is worth remembering that....

Capabilities before
deficits/impairment
Universal (all) before special (some)
PRACTICE INTERLUDE
How inclusive is the school? What did they do to prepare? Did they adopt the right course of action? What would you do?
IMPORTANT POINT
What counts as inclusive is highly context specific
Some teachers are happy to settle for 'small' inclusion
Some teachers are operating 'integration' whilst thinking
it is 'inclusion'
Integration
The learner is in the school but has to change in order
to fit in. It is a more conservative approach than inclusion.

Inclusion
The learner is in the school but the school adapts itself to its
learner population.
The dilemma of difference (Norwich, 2008)
On the one hand
if we do not identify
difference (e.g by labelling
pupils as 'SEN' or 'dyslexic')
we risk neglecting their needs.

On the other hand, if we
do identify difference, we risk
stigmatising and marginalising
learners
Effective professional development for inclusive teaching: What to bear in mind on the un-ending journey.....


And finally, a parting piece of advice.
Buy this.....

References
Hart, S., Dixon, A., Drummond, MJ., McIntyre, D. (2004) Learning without limits. Maidenhead: OUP
Corbett, J. (2001) Supporting Inclusive Education. London: Routledge
Giangreco, M.F and Ruelle, K. (2002) Absurdities and Realities of Special Education: The Best of Ants..., Flying..., and Logs. New York: Corwin Press
Liaisidou, A. (2012) Inclusive education, policy and policy making. London: Continuum
Riddick, B. (2012) Labelling learners with SEND, the good the bad and the ‘ugly’. In: Armstrong, D. and Squires G. eds., Contemporary issues in special educational needs: Considering the whole child. Maidenhead: Open University Press
This is available as an e-book
Norwich, B. (2008) Dilemmas of diffrence, inclusion and disability. Oxon: Routledge
Corbett, J. (1996) Bad-Mouthing: The Language of Special Needs. Bristol:Falmer Press.
Graham, L.J. (2007) ‘Out of sight, out of mind/out of mind, out of site:
schooling and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder’, International Journal of
Peer, L. and Reid, G. (2012) 'Special Educational Needs: A guide for inclusive practice.' London: Sage.pp.9-23

Image from: Giangreco, M.F and Ruelle, K. (2002) Absurdities and Realities of Special Education: The Best of Ants..., Flying..., and Logs. New York: Corwin Press
Peer and Reid, 2012
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