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Unit 4 Informational Text

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Eric Russo

on 9 February 2013

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Transcript of Unit 4 Informational Text

Main Ideas
and Imortant Details Objective: Warm-Up: Lesson: Work Period: Quick Write Closing: Inital Read Students will be able to apply reading strategies to determine important ideas in “Insect Munchies.” Big Question: How do we distinguish between what we think and what the author is saying? Record any questions you have.

Focus on Think Questions that deepen your understanding Reader's Response - SSR What are your reactions to the clip; Have you ever eaten a bug? Would you eat bugs if your life depended on it? Turn and Talk: The speaker in "Ham n' Eggs" uses food imagery to show how comfortable he is at grandma's house. The sights, smells and sounds of food are mostly pleasant and cozy: eggs frying, nice red beets, the smell of ham in the air. The speaker's grandmother must care about him to make such a large meal. The sights, smell, and sounds of cooking remind the reader of the comforts of home and family. Summarize the article. Share Out PULL UP: You need . . . A Pen or Pencil
A Piece of Paper
A copy of the article SECTION INNER
CONVERSATION AUTHOR'S
THINKING SECTION INNER
CONVERSATION AUTHOR'S
THINKING SECTION INNER
CONVERSATION AUTHOR'S
THINKING SECTION INNER
CONVERSATION AUTHOR'S
THINKING A successful one includes... 1. A topic sentence introducing
the article (title, author)
2. A description of the main
idea of the article
3. Two pieces of text evidence
that support the main idea
4. Proper grammar and spelling Questions

Connections

Inferences What is the author trying to say? "Insect Munchies" PREVIEW & PREDICT Title your paper and make the chart: "Insect Munchies" Author's
Thoughts Main Ideas,
Argument,
Thesis Text Features & Important Ideas Objective: Warm-Up: Lesson: Work Period: BCR Tomorrow: Skill Day Students will analyze text features in order to explain how they clarify the main idea Big Question: How do text features help a reader understand the article? Record any questions you have.

Focus on Think Questions that deepen your understanding Reader's Response - SSR The speaker in "Ham n' Eggs" uses food imagery to show how comfortable he is at grandma's house. The sights, smells and sounds of food are mostly pleasant and cozy: eggs frying, nice red beets, the smell of ham in the air. The speaker's grandmother must care about him to make such a large meal. The sights, smell, and sounds of cooking remind the reader of the comforts of home and family. PULL UP: You need . . . A Pen or Pencil
"Bug Munchies" article Evaluating and improving our BCRs Text Feature Category Sort Put the post it notes into the right categories
Use your memory to determine: What TYPE of text features are they?
Call a teacher over to see if your group has it right The subtitle and picture are most likely included in this article to __.

A. show someone eating a grasshopper
B. persuade a reader to eat bugs
C. illustrate what eating a grasshopper looks like
D. better understand what insects people can eat The heading, BUGS IN OUR FUTURE, helps a reader understand the article because it __.

A. describes why bugs will be our future food
B. tells how easy it is to raise insects for food
C. explains why insects provide more food
D. reveals the effects of using pesticides We Do - Partners Use the chart on page 11 to answer the following questions 1) Pick which item on the chart you think is healthiest and explain why.

2) Why are non-insects grouped at the bottom of the chart under a bold bar? How does this format help you better understand the information presented?

3) Where else outside the chart does the author provide this info in the text?

4) Why do you think the author included this chart / what is the author's purpose for including this chart? 5) The chart, Bugs & Burgers: How Do They Stack Up, most helps a reader understand __.
A. small grasshoppers have a lot of protien
B. crickets have more calcium than other insects
C. that burgers and fish taste better than bugs
D. the nutritional value of insects compared to beef
or fish You Do - On Your Own 6) The picture and caption on page 10 helps a reader understand the article because it shows __.
A. many cultures eat insects regularly
B. people dislike wings and legs of insects
C. importance of eating cicadas is in Cambodia
D. cicadas are really locusts in Cambodia Explain how a text feature in the article helps to clarify the main idea/purpose of the article. Use information from the text feature and article in your explanation. 1 - Answer the question
2 - Provide text evidence that
supports your answer
3 - Explain your answer and
add an inference / extension UNIT 4 Text
Features Purpose & Viewpoint Organization Entering/Leaving Turn
and Talk= Pull-Up= Group Teams= Cold Calling= Stations= Literature Circle= Great Job/Off Task Classroom Jobs Absences Raise Your Hand Bathroom Getting Up 5 Minute Drills= INSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Ms. SNOWDON & Mr. RUSSO HUMANITIES Grade 8 Have your Student Notebook and your agenda books
Get your FOLDER
Librarian gets Team Books
Everyone Begins Warm-Up
Finish Warm-up and begin Independent Reading Entering Leaving Clean up your area (garbage, belongings)
Put all work in your FOLDERS
We will line you up once you are ready
Turn your Folder as you come up to line
We will escort you to the next class Raise your Hand! To ask a question ...
To answer a question ...
To make a comment ...
When you need help ... + A+ SUCCESS LEARNING ideas 100% Great Job! Off Task When you are absent . . . G
E
T
Up! CLASS JOBS: L
E
T
'S
Practice! HW= Quick Write= You want to be HERE Come in and get working Work with your best effort You want to be HERE DON'T Not taking learning seriously talking not working up to potential •Falcon Bucks
•Positive Phone Call
•Note to Parent
•Prize Box
•Homework Pass •Verbal Reminder
•Student Conference
•Parent Contact
•Guidance Notification
•Behavior Plan GREAT JOB OFF TASK Everyone say the SMARTEST thing you can think of . . . We will determine who says something in the smartest way. Don't Do it When the one of the teachers is instructing the class

During SSR

In the middle of a worktime or a station. IT's OK When it is for class

During transitions between stations

When you're working in groups

When you're feeling tired. Class Time is IMPORTANT School policy is two bathroom passes per clas, per quarter

No passes the first or last 15 minutes of the mod

We will be keeping track. When You need to go Raise your hand like this Wait for one of us to come over SSR= Explicit Instruction = I do, We do, You do When we are learning something new, or have to show you how to do something, everyone will come up to the front of the classroom Why? It is easier to stay focused.

We will be practicing together and talking with different people.

It gives us a chance to move around This is Important! Station Expectations: We will be writing all year. Sometimes we will work to write formal essays, and other times we will have a shorter "Quick Write" questions That will require three things: Text Evidence An opinion about the answer

An argument to support your opinion
and why your text evidence is relevant We cover elements of grammar we will to make us all better writers Sometimes Groups will be assigned There will be group roles each time Sometimes groups
will be moving between stations You are your group We need your attention -
You need to: One Hand Up Stop Talking
Raise your hand
Focus your attention on us L
E
T
'S
Practice! Everyone talk to the person to their right . . . When the signal goes up, follow the appropriate steps for refocusing. Find your work in your folder (There will be work in there) Speak to one of us on the way in Complete the daily warm-up Ask someone at your table for notes from the days missed Copy notes into your notebook/binder If there is still time, begin reading, or conference with a teacher This is important You can do it! We won't give up on you After you finish your warm up, begin reading Read quietly until the timer goes off
We will play light instrumental music in the background
Jot down inner conversation on your reading log
You may only abondon a book once per quarter
Choose a book that's "Just Right" Silent Sustained Reading/Self Selected Reaidng Warm Up= Once you take you seat A Warm Up is on the board - Complete it in your notebook “I already explained it to you twice!” she cried out in exasperation.

What do you think exasperation means? Explain or highlight key words. Vocabulary, Grammar, or Open Response Turn and Talk is a great way to share what we're thinking . . . We will give you a topic or question to talk about

Your will to someone next to you

Then about the topic or questions

Then they will respond with their thoughts TURN TALK Active Listening Accountable Talk We will have written homework 2 times per week Tuesday and Thursdays Every Night . . . This is due the NEXT DAY HW
Assigned Placed in
FOLDER (completed) D
O

Y
O
U
R

B
E
S
T D
O

Y
O
U
R

B
E
S
T DO YOUR BEST Read for 30 Minutes
Read what you like to read
Fill out the Home Reading Log
Get it signed by your parents every week Grading= Librarian: hands out & collects SSR books

Timekeeper: makes sure group can finish in time

Note-taker: takes great class notes for absent students

Materials Manager: in charge of supplies & group cleanliness

Group Leader: keeps everyone on task and involved We Need YOU Listening
Processing
Responding On Topic
Everyone Contributes + Fill in an application! Practice = How did you feel about the First day of School? Facilitator Writer Timekeeper Presenters(2) Illustrator Hold each other
ACCOUNTABLE sometimes not use you rubric Mr. Russo Writer 5 (awesome) 5 (this guy is great!) (sometimes) Fill in each column for every member of your group I think that it is very important for the teacher to have rules, since we have rules as students. Teachers should be prepared and ready for class. I don't like a teacher that yells or makes fun of me either. I think it is important for a teacher to be fair above all, adn to be helpful when I have a problem or don't understand something Teachers should be responsible to show their Falcon PRIDE. Example: Only when you are told to move, Stay at your station, or Raise your hand, Move between stations QUIETLY Movement: On Task: Focus on the work (independent or group), Good Effort Monitor: Your Own Behavior,
Get your work Done Stations: Vocabulary Computers READING Research Smart Board Quick Write Independent
Work Station Turn & Talk What do we gain from reading a lot? What are some ways to decide if a book is a good fit for you? Turn & Talk Our Class Library Treat the books with respect & care - they need to last
If returning books to a shelf, place back neatly 1) 2) Books organized by reading level (Lexile)
Your selected book will go in group's ziploc bag INFORMATIONAL
TEXT Purpose & Audience Objective: Reader's
Response: Lesson: DAYS 2 & 3 Viewpoint Objective: SSR: Lesson: Work Period: Independent Work: Closing: DAY 1 Main Ideas &
Messages Initial Read Objective: SSR: Lesson: Work Period: Closing: DAY 1 Main Idea by Paragraph Objective: Lesson: Work Period: DAY 2 Final Project &
Test Review News Article Project Objective: Lesson: Independent Work: Closing: DAY 1 Test Review Objective: Closing: DAY 2 Figurative Language Objective: Lesson: Work Period: Independent Work: HW: DAY 1 Evaluation Fishbowl Discussion Objective: Lesson: Independent Work: Closing: DAY 1 Additional Information Objective: Lesson: Work Period: BCR: Closing: DAY 2 Additional Info BCR Objective: Reader's Response
Focus: Lesson: Work Period: Closing: DAY 3 Scholars will be able to analyze author’s purpose and determine the intended audience. Chose the best paraphrase for our objective:
1 - We'll figure out the author's reasons and choose the people who read it.
2 - We'll look at why the author wrote the article and who he/she wrote it for. Closing: Make an infernece or prediction Summarize
and
Synthesize Reader's Response: Tell about what you read in your own words. Think - Write - Share: What do you think about having to wear a school uniform?
What is the worst part about it?
What is at least one benefit? Scholars will be able to analyze the author's viewpoint Big Idea: What is the author's opinion in the article? How can we tell? SHARE: Point to your partner Read this BCR answer and:

1) Underline the answer to the question
2) Circle the text evidence

3) Put a star next to the inference, extension or explanation On the Back of the Article: Organizational Patterns Objective: SSR: Lesson: DAY 1 Summarize
and
Synthesize Reader's Response: Tell about what you read in your own words. Data Review Students will be able to identify and explain different types of organizational patterns. Big Idea: What are the different ways that I can organize my writing? Discussion Organizational Patterns Objective: SSR: Work Period: Quick Write Review DAY 2 Activate & Connect Reader's Response: Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen. Students will be able to analyze the use of organizational patterns in an article. Organization Stations By the American flag Record and questions you have.

Focus on Think Questions that deepen your understanding. Reader's Response - SSR Scholars will be able to analyze historical articles and paraphrase important ideas Big Question: What were some siginficant events in black history? Scholars will be able to select main ideas and paraphrase them in order to summarize an informational article. Big Idea: How do I summarize without neglecting important info?S Ask a question "Who/What/Where/Why...?"

"I wonder..." How did you describe this image? SHARE: Read ONE side of the articles about your topic
Mark up important ideas
Paraphrase at least one big idea from each paragraph Activate
and
Connect SSR: Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen. Scholars will be able to determine main ideas and analyze supporting details of an article. Big Idea: What are the important ideas of this article? Scholars will be able to synthesize their knowledge about informational articles for review Big Question: How do we apply everything we've learned to one article? Record any reactions to what you read

"I can't believe..."
"Reading about _____ made me angry / happy / nervous / etc. because..." Reader's Response - SSR SSR Reader's Response: write one thing you learned (a fact, something new about a character, etc.) Scholars will be able to analyze figurative language to determine a poem’s meaning Big Question: What does the poet ACTUALLY mean? Fill in the blank with an animal that would fit the description:

She’s as sneaky as a ________
He’s loud like a _________
She moves as slowly as a _________ Think - Write - Share SHARE: Point to your partner What animals did you choose?

She’s as sneaky as a ________
He’s loud like a _________
She moves as slowly as a _________ Figurative Language Figurative language goes beyond the literal meaning of words to create a deeper meaning. Figurative Language Devices Simile: comparing two things using "like" or "as" Ex: She is as slow as a turtle Metaphor: comparing two things WITHOUT using "like" or "as" Ex: His lightening voice rumbled over us Personification: giving human-like qualities to non-human objects Ex: The kite danced in the wind Authors use these devices to describe things in a new, creative way Hope is the thing with feathers / that perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words / And never stops at all This metaphor is used to show how:

A) Hope is the name of the speaker's pet bird
B) People hold on to hope in their hearts
C) There is no hope left in the world The ginko tree forces its way through gray concrete
like a city child, it grows up in the street This simile is used to show how:

A) Rough and tough a ginkgo tree is
B) Ginkgo trees grow in concrete
C) The Ginkgo is turning into a human Let the rain kiss you / let the rain sing you a lullaby. This personification is used to show how:

A) It's very romantic when it rains
B) Rain is comforting, like a mother
C) Raindrops are good at kissing and singing I say frighten me
She shouts thunder, flashes lightening This metaphor best describes how:

A) Her mom is caught in a rainstorm
B) Her mom has thunder bolts coming out of her mouth
C) Her mom can be very loud and flashy Summer grass aches and whispers; it calls out for rain This personification best describes how:

A) it hasn't rained on the grass in a while
B) the grass is talking to the sky
C) how it's about to start raining What happens to a dream deferred?
Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun? This simile best describes how:

A) your dream was once a grape
B) your dream might shrivel up and change
C) your dream might still keep going Write the letter of the correct answer on your white board ON YOUR INDEX CARD -
Explain the difference between people who make your thoughts "like leaves all brown and dried," and people who make your "thoughts as thick as fireflies." Write a poem describing yourself or someone you know. Poem must:
use at least 4 fig. language devices
be at least 12 lines long Quick Write SHARE: Point to your partner What animals did you choose?

She’s as sneaky as a ________
He’s loud like a _________
She moves as slowly as a _________ SSR Record a reaction to something you read "I can't believe..."
"Woah! I'm surprised that..."
"Reading about ____ made me
happy/angry/sad because..." Think & Write How do you think that the Achievement Gap articles relate or connect to Black History Month? How do you think that the Achievement Gap articles relate or connect to Black History Month? Students will be able to evaluate the author's argument and synthesize information. Big Question: How do we combine our knowledge to create new thinking? Point to your partner! Discussion Questions •Based on the articles we read, what statements do you agree with concerning the Achievement Gap?

•What information did you find new or shocking?

•What steps should schools or government take to start closing the achievement gap? Something you learned Non-Fiction:

Fiction: A fact you never knew before


Something new about your character or the plot of your story How do you feel about BCRs? Do you think you've gotten better at writing them over the year?
What are the 3 elements needed for every BCR answer? Think - Write - Share Pull up with folder + pen Best Paraphrase:
1 - We will look at an article critically and decide what the author should've added to make his argument stronger.

2 - We will judge whether or not the author's argument is fair and balanced. Point to your Partner: Who are you Sharing With? SHARE: Scholars will be able to evaluate an article to determine additional info that would clarify or strengthen the author's viewpoint. Big Question: What else should the author have inluded in the aritcle? SSR "This reminds me of..."

"This sounds like..." Reader's Response:

Make a connection Exemplars on visualizer Re-Writing for Clarity Objective: Warm-Up: Lesson: Work Period: Fix Your BCR Closing: BCR Day Students will be able to evaluate other BCRs in order to make their own writing clearer Big Question: How do I make my answer better? Make an inference or prediction based on what you read today.

"I think this means..."
"I bet..." Reader's Response - SSR PULL UP: You need . . . A Pen or Pencil
Your "Insect Munchies" BCR about text features Celebrating our work Who Am I? - Text Features At your table group, write the text feature that best matches the "Who Am I?" description. FOLDER CLEAN OUT Move notes and graphs to your BINDER
Anything else you want to keep --> BINDER
Throw away anything you don't want
Turn in late work to a teacher Explain how a text feature in the article helps to clarify the main idea/purpose of the article. Use information from the text feature and article in your explanation. The subtitle and picture in the article helps the reader see that the author is trying to convince us that eating bugs is a good thing. The subtitle suggests that bugs are "tasty" and that they are going to be "all the rage." Describing insects as tasty and popular serves as a hint that the article will show it in a positive light. The picture behind the subtitle shows a mouth with a bug between its teeth, and it seems to be smiling. The author is using the picture and subtitle as evidence that anyone can easily enjoy the "tasty treat" of a cricket. 1) Switch your paper with someone else
2) Write “Editor: ______” and your name at the bottom
3) Code the BCR 1-2-3 (1- answer; 2- text evidence; 3- explanation/inference) if they have all three
4) Describe one thing the writer did well
5) Describe one thing that needs to be fixed or added
6) Write down what score you think they’ve earned Peer Editing The main idea of the article is about how bugs are healthier for you than meet, and how bugs are very nutritious. People from different countries and other people cultures are about them eating bug. Because in the story it says “insects raised for food is easier and requires far production than conventional sources such as chickens.” Insect are betting on bugs as the food of the future. Explain how a text feature in the article helps to clarify the main idea/purpose of the article. Use information from the text feature and article in your explanation. A text feature in an article helps the main idea because that text feature can show how or an example of the sentence or paragraph. BCR Sample 1 BCR Sample 2 Sidebar heading subtitle photo table of contents list table caption chart diagram hyperlink Who Am I? - Text Features 1. caption

2. subtitle

3. heading

4. table

5. table of contents

6. sidebar Label the back of your paper (or a new sheet of paper) "Text
Features BCR - Version 2"
Write out the question
Code the question (1, 2, 3)
Re-write your BCR with a proper written response
Code your answer (1,2, 3) Subtitles & Main Ideas Objective: SSR Lesson: Work Period: Closing: Skill Day 2 Students will be able to analyze how an article's headings support main ideas Big Question: Why did the author use those headings? Make a connection
"This reminds me of..." Reader's Response PULL UP: You need . . . A Pen or Pencil
Paper for notes Celebrating our work FOLDER CLEAN OUT Move anything you want to keep to your BINDER
Keep everything else in your OLD FOLDER, and hand over to a teacher
Write your name on your new folder in marker (first & last) Headings & Main Idea Headings:
Divide a text into sections
Preview the main idea of the section
Are printed in large and/or bold font so they stand out
Help the reader locate information Titles, subtitles, and subheadings can give us important clues to help us figure out or understand the main idea A G Avalanche! When snow on a slope gives in to gravity, we know
it as an avalanche. Avalanches happen naturally
or they are triggered by people—skiers, snowboarders,
hikers, snowmobilers, or anyone who is out in
mountainous areas in the winter. Types of Avalanches There are a few different types of avalanches. The
“loose snow” avalanche is fresh snow that spreads out
as it tumbles down the mountain, so it rarely gets deep
enough to bury someone. “Ice fall” avalanches occur
on glaciers, when a chunk of glacier separates from
another and drops steeply. There is even the “roof
avalanche,” when snow built up on the roof of a house
slides off. The Most Dangerous Avalanche The type of avalanche of greatest concern to hikers and skiers is the “slab avalanche,” which is when a huge chunk of snow comes plummeting down a mountainside in one piece. One of the reasons it is so dangerous is that there are few visible telltale signs that an area may have an avalanche.
A slab avalanche can reach speeds as high as
120 miles per hour. The speed and force of the snow hurtling down the mountain that fast can hurt a person in its path. If you survive all that, suffocation becomes your next problem. The snow can bury you completely. Loud noises do not trigger avalanches. What does
trigger them is a sudden increase in weight in just the
right area.
Ninety percent of avalanches are triggered by
the person who gets buried, or by someone who is with
that person. Just the weight of one person stepping on
just the right spot on a slope of snow can cause the slab
of snow to start sliding! To be safe from avalanches, never hike or ski alone. Carry rescue equipment with you. And learn to read the signs of a potential avalanche so the weight of your own body doesn’t turn it into a real avalanche! Classwork Assignment Handout (in folder)
Read each section of the article carefully
Think about the main idea of that section
Select a subtitle for that section based on the main idea Subheading Handout Take out the "Heading & Main Idea" handout from your folder
Determine a subheading for each section of the article Notes Quick Write What would be another good title for your article? How would that give the reader a preview about the main idea of the article? Turn & Talk The Achievement Gap Objective: SSR: Work Period: Independent Work: Closing: Initial Read Scholars will be able to analyze and paraphrase important ideas in an article. Big Question: What is the article about? Activate
and
Connect Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen. Pull Up With: Your folder
A pen / pencil
(and highlighter, if you have one) Vocab in context: I feel vexed about the math test I didn't study for. The company is losing money; its future is bleak. adj. - worried, frustrated adj. - note hopeful or encouraging;
discouraging or depressing noun - something that requires action; importance We're running late, so please walk with more urgency. Pull Up Bring:
"Insect Munchies" article
A pen or a pencil Show off what you know: which words do you recognize? Can you define any of them? nonfiction author's viewpoint author's purpose summarize paraphrase intended audience Simply put, these are NON-FICTION texts that are meant to inform us about something. Some examples include . . . Unit 4 looks at Informational Texts. Speeches Newspapers Letters Online Sources Dictionary/
Reference Text books By the end of the unit, you should be able to:

-determine important information
-summarize and paraphrase information
-interpret author's purpose and audience
-explain organizational structure
-analyze the text features
-evaluate how good an article is What do we want us to know about informational Text? Turn & Talk What did you notice I was doing while I looked for important information? How did I determine which info to keep, and which to leave out?
1) People are omnivores- they can eat both
plants and animals.
2) The human digestive system absorbs
nutrients from almost any edible source.
3) The small intestine completes digestion of
sugars and proteins, and breaks down fat.
4) If you’re a health nut, you might want to check
out tasty insect treats. Which of these sentences would be most important to include in a summary of this article? Let's PREDICT Based on the title, what do you think "Texting: the Teenage Girls' Addiction" will be about? Directions 1) Read the article
2) Highlight key info & messages
3) Put info in your own words (paraphrase)
4) Write a clear summary on the back of the article Which of these sentences would be most important to include in a summary of this article? A) Tony Orsini, a New Jersey middle school principal
with common sense, is not gullible.
B) 12% of all students report they can have cell
phones at school anytime.
C) The electronic age may now start suppressing girls
with texting.
D) There is absolutely no reason for any middle
school student to be a part of a social networking
site! Initial Read Objective: SSR: Lesson: Work Period: Closing: DAY 1 Scholars will be able to analyze the author’s purpose and viewpoint in an article. Big Question: What did the author have in mind when writing the article? React "I can't believe...!"

"I'm angry/ shocked/ excited/ worried about..." Pull Up Bring:
"Insect Munchies" article
A pen, pencil or highlighter Directions 1) Use the Texting article
2) Select four pieces of text
evidence that show the
author's viewpoint Viewpoint Viewpoint is the author's opinion Similar to: argument or perspective
Authors usually use facts + opinions combined
Facts support their opinion Determining Viewpoint 3) Put them on your four sticky notes
4) Place them in order from most useful
to least useful on a piece of paper The author of this article would probably agree that:
A) Texting is unecessary and even harmful to teenagers
B) That texting can be useful in a classroom setting, if
used the right way
C) 64% of teenagers have texted during class
D) the main reason students do poorly in school is
because of cell phones The author of this article would probably agree that:
A) No one should have to eat bugs
B) Eating bugs is gross but necessary
C) Eating bugs is healthy and normal
D) Eating bugs is delicious and a privilege Author's Purpose The reason the author wrote the article




They often write with a specific reader in mind (intended auidence) To Inform To Entertain To Persuade •Does this article include more thoughts/opinions, or is it mostly facts?
•Does the writer want to convince you to act a certain way or to do something? If so, what?
•Is the writer trying to teach you something? If so, what?•Is this article funny or entertaining? NEW OLD A = 70-75%
B = 60-69%
C = 53-59%
D = 45-52%
E = 44% NARRATIVE TEST by the numbers 27
2
15
16 ? Organizational Patterns sequential cause & effect main idea/details compare & contrast Writers arrange their papers on purpose

Different styles work for different reasons What pattern would be best for the following topics? If you did
Smart Board w/ Ms. Snowdon If you did writing w/ Mr. Russo Go back for writing activity Move up for Smartboard activity Friday Today There are many reasons that cities grew bigger over the 20th century. Increasing industrialization resulted in the creation of many factory jobs located in cities. Because of the jobs available, many people from rural areas were motivated to move. There were also many schools established to educate the children of the new factory laborers. Consequently, the promise of a better education persuaded many families to leave farming communities and move to the cities. You can perserve peaches by following a few simple steps. First, check the jars for cracks or chips. Second, place the lids in boiling water to sterilize. Wash the jars and rings in hot, soapy water while the lid boils. Next, place the boiling hot peaches and syrup into the hot, sterilized jars. Potatoes might seem boring, but they're a great food item and should be appreciated more. They are widely available across the country and always affordable. They're versatile - they can be baked, fried, mashed, and more. Without a ton of butter or salt, they've got nutritional value too, as a notable source of protein, fiber, and potassium. 1 - Spatial / Descriptive
2 - Sequential
3 - Problem & Solution 1 - Main Idea & Supporting Details
2 - Cause & Effect
3 - Compare & Contrast 1 - Sequential
2 - Compare & Contrast
3 - Cause & Effect The similarities and differences between AT&T and Verizon
How to deal with school bullies
An explanation of what Drew Freeman (the building) looks like Spatial / Descriptive Problem & Solution
Cause & Effect Compare & Contrast
Main Idea & Support Sequential Whole Article Main Idea: Think - Write - Share Do you eat healthy at home? What about at school? Why do you think it's important to eat a healthy lunch? Pull Up with... Think - Write - Share
Pen or Pencil Do you eat healthy at home? What about at school? Why do you think it's important to eat a healthy lunch? Think - Write - Share 1. What is the main idea of the fourth paragraph?
A) Some schools in the U.S. have later start times
than others
B) Many teenagers go to bed late and suffer the
consequences in school
C) It’s impossible for teenagers to sleep the
recommended 9 hours a night
D) If teenagers were able to sleep more, they
would do better in school 2. Which main idea does the following detail support?
[Studies show that teenagers who sleep nine and a half hours have less depression, are late to class less often, and suffer fewer health problems. Paragraph 3]
A) Schools open too early for students who don’t
sleep well
B) Getting plenty of sleep has psychological and
health benefits for teens
C) Teenagers who don’t sleep enough end up getting
into more car accidents
D) Teenagers who get plenty of sleep do better in
school 3. The statistics from the NSF in paragraph 2 support the main idea that:
A) Many teens suffer from insomnia,
narcolepsy, and sleep apnea
B) The NSF conducts research on teens who
don’t get enough sleep in order to help them
C) Schools should start later for teenagers so
they can get better grades
D) Teens don’t get enough sleep 4. Which paragraph includes the most supporting details for the main idea that teens would improve their academic performance with more sleep?
A) Paragraph 4
B) Paragraph 3
C) Paragraph 2
D) Paragraph 1 5. Which of the following best describes the main idea from the entire article?
A) Sleeping disorders such as sleep apnea and
insomnia are a huge problem among teenagers
in the U.S. today
B) Teenagers are not getting enough sleep and are
therefore not doing well in school
C) Schools should start later so that teens can enjoy the
health and academic benefits of a good night’s sleep
D) If teenagers got to sleep more, it would benefit
everyone, including teachers and principals Read this BCR answer and:

1) Underline the answer to the question
in PINK or RED
2) Underline the text evidence in YELLOW
3) Underline the extension or inference in
ORANGE
4) Give it a score of 0, 1, 2 or 3
5) Answer the questions below Author's Purpose is the author's reason for writing something.
What does he/she hope to accomplish?
Why did he/she write the article?
What audience is he/she writing to? Author's purpose To Inform Authors think about their audience when writing. Who will read it?
Is it a begginner or an expert?
Is it a friend or a stranger?
Is it someone who already agrees with them, or are they trying to change someone's mind about a topic? Guitar Hero is the best of all of the Wii games. When you play Guitar Hero, you feel like a real rock star. This game is much more fun than any others. When you choose a Wii game, make sure that you choose Guitar Hero.

1) Inform
2) Entertain
3) Persuade The NFL's Vince Lombardi Trophy returned to its title city Sunday night after the Green Bay Packers emerged as Super Bowl champions. At this year's Super Bowl XLV, the Packers scored a hard-earned 31-25 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

1) Inform
2) Entertain
3) Persuade The Packers are one of the greatest teams in the NFL. Their recent victory in Super Bowl XLV should be proof enough. If that’s not enough to convince you, look at Aaron Rodgers’ stats – surely one of the current strongest quarterbacks in the game.

1) Inform
2) Entertain
3) Persuade Joe had been fishing for over two hours without a single bite. Suddenly there was a nibble at the end of his fishing line. He stood up on the boat and leaned out too far. Just then there was a sharp yank on the line. Joe fell overboard and landed head first into the water.

1) Inform
2) Entertain
3) Persuade Tim Jackson has always been a friend and public servant to education in this state. In 1996, he passed legislation to make community college programs more affordable. He has long been an advocate for smaller class sizes and better preschool programs. If you want to keep education a priority, vote Tim Jackson this November. No other candidate will ensure the success of your children in school the way he will.

The author’s main purpose in this text is most likely to:
1) Explain how to vote in an election
2) Inform the reader about Tim Jackson’s accomplishments
3) Persuade the reader to vote for Tim Jackson
4) Defend Tim Jackson from unfair accusations P. I. E. As easy as To Entertain To Persuade To convince the reader to follow the writer’s opinion. Synonyms: convince, sway To state facts about a particular subject Synonmys: Explain, clarify, outline, describe To humor, excite or simply bring about an emotion from the reader Synonmys: Humor, amuse These reforms will help people get jobs that are open today. But to prepare for the jobs of tomorrow, our commitment to skills and education has to start earlier.

For less than one percent of what our Nation spends on education each year, we've convinced nearly every State in the country to raise their standards for teaching and learning - the first time that's happened in a generation.

But challenges remain. And we know how to solve them.

At a time when other countries are doubling down on education, tight budgets have forced States to lay off thousands of teachers. We know a good teacher can increase the lifetime income of a classroom by over $250,000. A great teacher can offer an escape from poverty to the child who dreams beyond his circumstance. Every person in this chamber can point to a teacher who changed the trajectory of their lives. Most teachers work tirelessly, with modest pay, sometimes digging into their own pocket for school supplies - just to make a difference.

Teachers matter. So instead of bashing them, or defending the status quo, let's offer schools a deal. Give them the resources to keep good teachers on the job, and reward the best ones. In return, grant schools flexibility: To teach with creativity and passion; to stop teaching to the test; and to replace teachers who just aren't helping kids learn. We also know that when students aren't allowed to walk away from their education, more of them walk the stage to get their diploma. So tonight, I call on every State to require that all students stay in high school until they graduate or turn eighteen.

When kids do graduate, the most daunting challenge can be the cost of college. At a time when Americans owe more in tuition debt than credit card debt, this Congress needs to stop the interest rates on student loans from doubling in July. Extend the tuition tax credit we started that saves middle-class families thousands of dollars. And give more young people the chance to earn their way through college by doubling the number of work-study jobs in the next five years.

Of course, it's not enough for us to increase student aid. We can't just keep subsidizing skyrocketing tuition; we'll run out of money. States also need to do their part, by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets. And colleges and universities have to do their part by working to keep costs down. Recently, I spoke with a group of college presidents who've done just that. Some schools re-design courses to help students finish more quickly. Some use better technology. The point is, it's possible. So let me put colleges and universities on notice: If you can't stop tuition from going up, the funding you get from taxpayers will go down. Higher education can't be a luxury - it's an economic imperative that every family in America should be able to afford. President Obama’s State of the Union Address
January 24, 2012 Exit Ticket 1. [We know a good teacher can increase the lifetime income of a classroom by over $250,000. A great teacher can offer an escape from poverty to the child who dreams beyond his circumstance]

The author most likely includes these sentences to:
A) To describe a teacher’s daily work life.
B) To convince the reader to stay in school and go to class.
C) To explain the importance of a good teacher.
D) To tell an entertaining story about teachers. 2. What is the purpose of paragraph 7 in this speech?
A) To persuade congress to make college more affordable.
B) To describe the challenges that exist when paying for college.
C) To amuse the wealthy audience watching the speech at home.
D) To outline college payment options for students.

3. Which of the following best describes the main idea from the entire speech?

A) College is too expensive in this country and should be more affordable.
B) Teachers aren’t appreciated enough in the United States and congress can help.
C) Students have to be in school until they graduate or turn eighteen.
D) Congress should help make a high-quality education more available for everyone. Intended Audience Money Info Voting How would you discuss school rules & uniform policy...
to a friend from another school?
with Dr. Dean?
How would your language be different? Would your purpose (persuade, inform, entertain) be different? Turn & Talk These reforms will help people get jobs that are open today. But to prepare for the jobs of tomorrow, our commitment to skills and education has to start earlier.

For less than one percent of what our Nation spends on education each year, we've convinced nearly every State in the country to raise their standards for teaching and learning - the first time that's happened in a generation.

But challenges remain. And we know how to solve them.

At a time when other countries are doubling down on education, tight budgets have forced States to lay off thousands of teachers. We know a good teacher can increase the lifetime income of a classroom by over $250,000. A great teacher can offer an escape from poverty to the child who dreams beyond his circumstance. Every person in this chamber can point to a teacher who changed the trajectory of their lives. Most teachers work tirelessly, with modest pay, sometimes digging into their own pocket for school supplies - just to make a difference.

Teachers matter. So instead of bashing them, or defending the status quo, let's offer schools a deal. Give them the resources to keep good teachers on the job, and reward the best ones. In return, grant schools flexibility: To teach with creativity and passion; to stop teaching to the test; and to replace teachers who just aren't helping kids learn. We also know that when students aren't allowed to walk away from their education, more of them walk the stage to get their diploma. So tonight, I call on every State to require that all students stay in high school until they graduate or turn eighteen.

When kids do graduate, the most daunting challenge can be the cost of college. At a time when Americans owe more in tuition debt than credit card debt, this Congress needs to stop the interest rates on student loans from doubling in July. Extend the tuition tax credit we started that saves middle-class families thousands of dollars. And give more young people the chance to earn their way through college by doubling the number of work-study jobs in the next five years.

Of course, it's not enough for us to increase student aid. We can't just keep subsidizing skyrocketing tuition; we'll run out of money. States also need to do their part, by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets. And colleges and universities have to do their part by working to keep costs down. Recently, I spoke with a group of college presidents who've done just that. Some schools re-design courses to help students finish more quickly. Some use better technology. The point is, it's possible. So let me put colleges and universities on notice: If you can't stop tuition from going up, the funding you get from taxpayers will go down. Higher education can't be a luxury - it's an economic imperative that every family in America should be able to afford. President Obama’s State of the Union Address
January 24, 2012 Let's also remember that hundreds of thousands of talented, hardworking students in this country face another challenge: The fact that they aren't yet American citizens. Many were brought here as small children, are American through and through, yet they live every day with the threat of deportation. Others came more recently, to study business and science and engineering, but as soon as they get their degree, we send them home to invent new products and create new jobs somewhere else.

That doesn't make sense.

I believe as strongly as ever that we should take on illegal immigration. That's why my Administration has put more boots on the border than ever before. That's why there are fewer illegal crossings than when I took office. The opponents of action are out of excuses. We should be working on comprehensive immigration reform right now. But if election-year politics keeps Congress from acting on a comprehensive plan, let's at least agree to stop expelling responsible young people who want to staff our labs, start new businesses, and defend this country. Send me a law that gives them the chance to earn their citizenship. I will sign it right away. State of the Union Address - Excerpt #2 Persuade Inform Entertain Comedian Personal
life story Encyclopedia
article Newspaper
article Politician's
speech T.V. commercial Instructional
booklet SMART Board SINK Library R G B 1. "Many were brought here as small children, are American through and through, yet they live every day with the threat of deportation."

The author most likely includes these sentences to:
A) To describe the circumstances of some immigrants.
B) To convince the reader that immigrants should be deported.
C) To explain how some Americans live.
D) To entertain Congress with popular stories about immigrants. 2. What is the purpose of paragraph 3 in this speech?
A) To inform the people what the Obama Administration has done about immigration.
B) To describe the challenges that Congress faces in an election year.
C) To entertain voters with descriptions of laws that he will sign.
D) To persuade Congress to give a chance for young immigrants to become citizens. 3. Which of the following best describes the main idea from the excerpt of this speech?

A) Immigration is a problem for many young people, and we need to do something about it.
B) Many immigrants are afraid of getting kicked out of the country.
C) If Congress sends laws to Obama, he will sign them.
D) Many immigrants have lived here most of their lives, and have not commited any crimes. SR PRACTICE What do you think about having to wear a school uniform?
What is the worst part about it?
What is at least one benefit? NOTES: Author's
Viewpoint Viewpoint
=opinion = perspective = argument

Writer's use facts to strengthen their opinions

Viewpoint is always in persuasive (PIE)

Viewpoint is connected to Purpose and Main Idea Which of these statements would the author of "Insect Munchies" most likely agree is true?

A. Eating bugs is the best snack you could ever want to eat.

B. People interested in healthy eating should consider eating bugs.

C. People in many other countries eat bugs.

D. There are hundreds of different types of bugs that are safe to eat. Think Back to "Insect Munchies" What was the Main Idea? What is the Author's Purpose? Who is the intended audience? What is the Author's Viewpoint? ?'s Let's Check for Main Idea, Purpose,
Audience, and VIEWPOINT Turn and Talk What is the author’s viewpoint on school uniforms? Give two details from the article that show us the author’s opinion.

Do you agree with the author’s viewpoint? Why or why not?

Did the article change your opinion on wearing uniforms? Answer the following with a partner: Then . . . Answer the BCR at the bottom of the page. The author of this article most probably would agree

1 - It makes sense for private schools to have uniforms.
2 - It is important to have your own sense of style.
3 - Students would be more focused on school if they wore uniforms.
4 - Students who don't wear uniforms aren't as smart as students who do. 1 - We'll closely look at how and why an aritcle is organized in a specific way.

2 - We'll break down the use of organizational patterns in a text. At Smartboard Windows Changes in organizational patterns
(with teacher) Post - It Sort -
Which organization pattern would most likely be used? Quick Write What is the main organization pattern, and why did they pick that organizational pattern? Do you think it's the best fit? Why or why not? Clipboards: determine the organizational pattern of each paragraph -
write on separate sheet of paper! Global population is growing rapidly, and one of the consequences is an increased amount of waste disposal (or trash). The more families that live in a particular area, the more trash that is produced. The average American family throws out about 4,000 lbs of trash a year, and as a result, landfills are overflowing across the country.
We are increasingly running out of land to hold all of our garbage at an alarming rate, and something must be done. The best place to start is a phrase we might've heard before but don't practice enough: reduce, reuse, recycle. If we reduce the amount of wasteful products we use, reuse items when possible, and recycle whatever is left, we will cut down on the amount of garbage we send to the overcrowded landfills. At a time when other countries are doubling down on education, tight budgets have forced states to lay off thousands of teachers. We know a good teacher can increase the lifetime income of a classroom by over $250,000. A great teacher can offer an escape from poverty to the child who dreams beyond his circumstance. Every person in this chamber can point to a teacher who changed the trajectory of their lives. Most teachers work tirelessly, with modest pay, sometimes digging into their own pocket for school supplies — just to make a difference. Teachers matter. So instead of bashing them, or defending the status quo, let’s offer schools a deal. Give them the resources to keep good teachers on the job, and reward the best ones. (Applause.) And in return, grant schools flexibility: to teach with creativity and passion; to stop teaching to the test; and to replace teachers who just aren’t helping kids learn. That’s a bargain worth making. (Applause.) What is the main organization pattern in the last two paragraphs of Excerpt 1? Do you think it's the best fit? Why or why not? When kids do graduate, the most daunting challenge can be the cost of college. At a time when Americans owe more in tuition debt than credit card debt, this Congress needs to stop the interest rates on student loans from doubling in July. Extend the tuition tax credit we started that saves millions of middle-class families thousands of dollars, and give more young people the chance to earn their way through college by doubling the number of work-study jobs in the next five years. Of course, it’s not enough for us to increase student aid. We can’t just keep subsidizing skyrocketing tuition; we’ll run out of money. States also need to do their part, by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets. And colleges and universities have to do their part by working to keep costs down. Turn & Talk Try to describe as many of these organizational patterns as you can: Cause & Efffect
Spatial / Descriptive
Main Idea & Detils Sequential / Chronological
Compare & Contrast (OR) Similarities & Differences Mr. Mom & Madam Speaker Objective: SSR: Lesson: Work Period: Independent Work: Closing: Initial Read Scholars will be able to apply reading strategies to determine important ideas in “Mr. Mom and Madam Speaker” Big Idea: What is the article about? Activate
and
Connect Try to make a connection to your own experiences or something that you’ve read or seen. Think–Write-Share: In lines 12-16: What is the speaker's attitude about the way most people read poetry? Groups: T. E. Tone Words Explanation Make a New Chart for your poem: Solo: T. E. Tone Words Explanation Focus Questions: "Poetry":



"Grandmother":



Winter Poem": What is the speaker’s attitude about poetry? How does the speaker feel about the Grandmother in this poem? What is the speaker’s feelings about winter? Review: What does “tone” mean? How can we determine a speaker’s tone? the speaker’s attitude towards his/her subject.

Words and Language choice help us figure out the tone of a poem.

Tone is described with “feeling” words Tone is Should some jobs be just for men and other jobs be just for women? Decide whether you agree or disagree:

1) Women can be good at fixing cars
2) Men should not teach elementary school
3) Women are not as good as being bosses as men are
4) Men are better at math and women are better at reading Point to your partner! Should some jobs be just for men and other jobs be just for women? Decide whether you agree or disagree:

1) Women can be good at fixing cars
2) Men should not teach elementary school
3) Women are not as good as being bosses as men are
4) Men are better at math and women are better at reading Inner Conversation =
Questions, Connections, and Inferences Vocab in context: Racial discrimination was a huge problem in the 1950's south The church, temple and mosque in our neighborhood show how much tolerance we have for different religions. adj. - predjudice, intolerance, unfairness n. - an attitude of acceptance;
open mindedness verb - to categorize or make assumtions I don't like how women are stereotyped as being emotional and dramatic in that movie Turn & Talk How can you apply this to your effort in school? An achievement gap separating black from white students has long been documented — a social divide extremely vexing to policy makers and the target of one blast of school reform after another. But a new report focusing on black males suggests that the picture is even bleaker than generally known.

Only 12 percent of black fourth-grade boys are proficient in reading, compared with 38 percent of white boys, and only 12 percent of black eighth-grade boys are proficient in math, compared with 44 percent of white boys. Poverty alone does not seem to explain the differences: poor white boys do just as well as African-American boys who do not live in poverty, measured by whether they qualify for subsidized school lunches.

The data was distilled from highly respected national math and reading tests, known as the National Assessment for Educational Progress, which are given to students in fourth and eighth grades. Although the outlines of the problem have been previously reported, the group hopes that including so much of what it calls “jaw-dropping data” will spark a new sense of national urgency.

“What this clearly shows is that black males who are not eligible for free and reduced-price lunch are doing no better than poor white males,” said Michael Casserly, executive director of the council.

The report shows that black boys on average fall behind from their earliest years. Black mothers have a higher infant mortality rate and black children are twice as likely as whites to live in a home where no parent has a job. In high school, African-American boys drop out at nearly twice the rate of white boys, and their SAT critical reasoning scores are on average 104 points lower. The analysis of results on the national tests found that math scores in 2009 for black boys were not much different than those for black girls in Grades 4 and 8, but black boys lagged behind Hispanics of both sexes, and they fell behind white boys by at least 30 points, a gap sometimes interpreted as three academic grades.

The search for explanations has recently looked at causes besides poverty, and this report may further those efforts. “There’s accumulating evidence that there are racial differences in what kids experience before the first day of kindergarten,” said Ronald Ferguson, director of the Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard. “They have to do with a lot of sociological and historical forces. In order to address those, we have to be able to have conversations that people are unwilling to have.”

Those include “conversations about early childhood parenting practices,” Dr. Ferguson said. “The activities that parents conduct with their 2-, 3- and 4-year-olds. How much we talk to them, the ways we talk to them, and the ways we enforce discipline.”

The report urges convening a White House conference, encouraging Congress to appropriate more money for schools and establishing networks of black mentors. What it does not discuss are policy responses identified with a robust school reform movement that emphasizes closing failing schools, offering charter schools as alternatives and raising the quality of teachers. Proficiency of Black Students Is Found to Be Far Lower Than Expected By: Trip Gabriel
for the New York Times Selected Response /
Clickers Viewpoint & Bias Objective: SSR: Lesson: Independent Work Closing / HW DAY 2 Summarize
and
Synthesize Reader's Response: Tell about what you read in your own words. Think - Write - Share: List pros (good) & cons (bad) for not being allowed to use cell phones in class Scholars will be able to evaluate the author's argument for bias Big Question: Was the author fair and balanced in the article? SHARE: Point to your partner 1) What is the main idea of the whole article?

2) Is this article very biased, somewhat biased, or unbiased?
How do you know? At the bottom of your chart: NOTES: Author's
Bias Pay attention to main idea, viewpoint, and bias USE BOTH ARTICLES TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING BCR: PRO CON Think - Write - Share: List pros (good) & cons (bad) for having a cell phone in school PRO CON Biased Unbiased /
Impartial Does not mention opposing view

Shows obvious preference or favoritism to one view

Usually to PERSUADE Presents both sides / viewpoints

Treats both sides or viewpoints fairly

Usually to INFORM Author's Viewpoint: _____________________ Details that support
author's viewpoint Details that support
a different viewpoint Is this article very biased, somewhat biased, or unbiased? ______________________ Uniforms are cheaper and easy to maintain

Students are treated equally

Students can focus on school, not fashion I have spent considerable time reading, thinking and researching issues inherent in the achievement gap. I practically lived and breathed the achievement gap, as during my time as a high school English teacher in Washington, DC, I daily encountered the gap and fought to close it by pushing my students towards academic success. I've now experienced this gap from numerous perspectives, if I have learned anything, it is that understanding the educational achievement gap between Whites and their non-White counterparts should consider the variety of reasons that have made the gap so wide.

Dozens of critiques have floated around the gap debate and many have been directed at the various people involved. Teachers blame uninvolved parents for their apparent lack of concern for their child's development; administrative leaders blame unmotivated principals and teachers for student failure; and parents and students blame boring lessons from disconnected teachers for failures.

While there may be some limited truth in elements in each of these critiques, perhaps the most unproductive and troubling accusation I've seen involves those who blame parents or families of failing students for not being involved.

To be perfectly honest, while working as a classroom teacher few things frustrated me more than teaching a full day, coaching after school, then staying two to three extra hours for parent-teacher conference, only to have a chance to speak with the families of four of the ninety students I taught. The lack of parental involvement simply baffled me, and left me feeling like the students' parents didn't seem to care at all.
The more experienced an educator I became, the more I could see how wrong I was. These criticisms aren’t being considerate to the parents' struggles to arrange nighttime childcare for their other children, or the hours' worth of lost salary those parents would have to sacrifice to be present at school functions.

They don’t take into consideration how effectively schools advertise back-to-school-night events, even.
Instead of placing so much blame on parents, it's important to consider how closely issues of race, poverty, and history are woven together. It’s also important to stop directing anger to parents and begin partnering with them.

Parents bring a tremendous wealth of knowledge regarding the academic and social performance of their child. They are generally ready and willing to assist educators in providing quality learning experiences for kids. While parents need to do their part in reaching out to the schools, educators can help by building essential bridges to parents, shake free previous bad assumptions, and then empower parents to assume important roles in school decision-making for the best outcomes for students. Parents Aren’t to Blame for the Achievement Gap Roderick Carey, HuffPost EducationPosted: 9/12/11 01:10 PM ET Which article more effectively expresses the author's attitude toward the achievement gap? In your response use information from the articles that support your answer. Pull up with your "Achievement Gap" article Fishbowl Discussion Dicussion Circle Observers Observers Observers Everyone must contribute at least one thing to the discussion
Must make connections to the articles (refer back to the text)
Paraphrase previous comment before giving your own thoughts.
Okay to agree with someone as long as you explain why you agree
Speak loudly and clearly Shadower: Evaluate one classmate’s discussion Reporter: Take notes on what was said & share out Silent Contributor – Pretend That You’re In the Discussion •Based on the article, what role do inactive parents and poverty play in the achievement gap? Do you agree with the article about this?

•What types of reasons do you see for the existence of the achievement gap?

•How is this topic relevant to Black History Month? How can you help close the achievement gap? What we did well What we can do better next time Growth since September Those who read the article carefully were extra insightful Connecting to other students' comments Not everyone participated An achievement gap separating black from white students has long been documented — a social divide extremely vexing to policy makers and the target of one blast of school reform after another. But a new report focusing on black males suggests that the picture is even bleaker than generally known.

Only 12 percent of black fourth-grade boys are proficient in reading, compared with 38 percent of white boys, and only 12 percent of black eighth-grade boys are proficient in math, compared with 44 percent of white boys. Poverty alone does not seem to explain the differences: poor white boys do just as well as African-American boys who do not live in poverty, measured by whether they qualify for subsidized school lunches.

The data was distilled from highly respected national math and reading tests, known as the National Assessment for Educational Progress, which are given to students in fourth and eighth grades. Although the outlines of the problem have been previously reported, the group hopes that including so much of what it calls “jaw-dropping data” will spark a new sense of national urgency.

“What this clearly shows is that black males who are not eligible for free and reduced-price lunch are doing no better than poor white males,” said Michael Casserly, executive director of the council.

The report shows that black boys on average fall behind from their earliest years. Black mothers have a higher infant mortality rate and black children are twice as likely as whites to live in a home where no parent has a job. In high school, African-American boys drop out at nearly twice the rate of white boys, and their SAT critical reasoning scores are on average 104 points lower. The analysis of results on the national tests found that math scores in 2009 for black boys were not much different than those for black girls in Grades 4 and 8, but black boys lagged behind Hispanics of both sexes, and they fell behind white boys by at least 30 points, a gap sometimes interpreted as three academic grades.

The search for explanations has recently looked at causes besides poverty, and this report may further those efforts. “There’s accumulating evidence that there are racial differences in what kids experience before the first day of kindergarten,” said Ronald Ferguson, director of the Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard. “They have to do with a lot of sociological and historical forces. In order to address those, we have to be able to have conversations that people are unwilling to have.”

Those include “conversations about early childhood parenting practices,” Dr. Ferguson said. “The activities that parents conduct with their 2-, 3- and 4-year-olds. How much we talk to them, the ways we talk to them, and the ways we enforce discipline.”


The report urges convening a White House conference, encouraging Congress to appropriate more money for schools and establishing networks of black mentors. What it does not discuss are policy responses identified with a robust school reform movement that emphasizes closing failing schools, offering charter schools as alternatives and raising the quality of teachers. Proficiency of Black Students Is Found to Be Far Lower Than Expected By: Trip Gabriel
for the New York Times Math Scores African-American
Students White Students Reading Scores African-American
Students White Students Paragraph 5 - What would you add? Chart List
Graph Picture
Heading Illustration Work With Your Table Groups "Parents Aren't to Blame" article Write down:
Two text features that should be added to the article (be specific, "A picture of _____" or "A subheading that says ______")

Two pieces of information the author could've added ("A description of ____," "An explanation for _____") Explain what information could have been added to "Parents Aren't to Blame" that would help a reader better understand an important idea in the article. In your response, use information from the article that supports your explanation. Scholars will be able to evaluate an article to determine additional info that would clarify or strengthen the author's viewpoint. How do you feel about BCRs? Do you think you've gotten better at writing them over the year?
What are the 3 elements needed for every BCR answer? NEW information the author could add: Specific examples
More details
Something to compare / contrast
The opposing viewpoint Explain what information could have been added to "Parents Aren't to Blame" that would help a reader better understand an important idea in the article. In your response, use information from the article that supports your explanation. I think the author should add charts, list and more info because it showing use more detail about the article and give a more understanding it. Student Sample 1 Student Sample 2 What should have been added to the article is examples of how to partner with parents. In paragraph 6 it say It's important to stop directing anger to parents and begin partnering with them. in my mind I'm thinking what do they mean, It's a lot of way partnering with parents. So I said they should add examples. Mark up the sample BCR answers and score them
Re-write your own answer on the back Evaluating & Correcting Black History Month Project Newspaper article that:
Paraphrases main ideas from provided handout
Includes text features you created
Is made to inform the reader
Has a two different organizational patterns
Includes your viewpoint about the topic Peaceful Protests /
Sit - Ins End of Slavey /
Emancipation Proclamation The Underground
Railroad Brown vs. BOE /
Education Equality Pull Up With: Pen / Pencil
Paper for notes
Folder Think - Write - Share What do you think of when you think "black history?" What are some historical events or people that should be remembered during Black History Month? What do you think of when you think "black history?" What are some historical events or people that should be remembered during Black History Month? SHARE Black History Month Project Write an article that:
Paraphrases main ideas from provided handout
Includes text features you created
Is made to inform the reader
Has 2 organizational patterns
Shows your viewpoint about the topic
Uses proper grammar & spelling
Is at least 5 paragraphs long Peaceful Protests /
Sit - Ins End of Slavey /
Emancipation Proclamation The Underground
Railroad Brown vs. BOE /
Education Equality Ms. Snowdon's Example: Beginning in the 1780s—during the time of the American Revolution—there arose in Western Europe and the United States a movement to abolish the institution of slavery and the slave trade that supported it. Advocates of this movement were called abolitionists, and the movement lasted well into the 1800s.



By the late 1700s ideas on slavery were changing. An intellectual movement in Europe, the Enlightenment, had made strong arguments in favor of the rights of man. The leaders of the American Revolution had issued a Declaration of Independence in 1776. This document also clarified a belief in the equality of all human beings. There was a gradual but steady increase in opposition to keeping human beings as private property. Article Excerpt Abolitionists were people in the United States who worked to get rid of slavery from the late 1700s until the 1800s. Paraphrasing Starting in the 1780s--at the same time as the American Revolution--there arose in the United States and Western Europe a movement to end the creation of slavery. Ideas of slavery were changing in the late 1700s. The Englightenment was a movement that made arguments for the rights of man. The Declaration of Independence of 1776 made beliefs about equality clear, and people started to oppose keeping humans as property.

Historical events like the Enlightenment and the Declaration of Independence really made people start to question slavery. They discussed treating all humans equally, so people began to wonder if it was right to treat particular people as if they were property. Fighting to Abolish Slavery By A. Snowdon Abolitionists were people in the United States who worked to get rid of slavery from the late 1700s until the 1800s. Historical events like the Enlightenment and the Declaration of Independence really made people start to question slavery. They discussed treating all humans equally, so people began to wonder if it was right to treat particular people as if they were property.


Slavery had been written into the United States Constitution in 1787, but a provision had also been made to abolish the slave trade. This was done in 1807. Unfortunately it coincided with a reinvigorated cotton economy in the South. From that time on, the North and South grew more and more different, both economically and in social attitudes.
The first formal organization to emerge in the abolitionist movement was the Abolition Society, founded in 1787 in England. Its leaders were Thomas Clarkson and William Wilberforce.
The society's first success came in 1807 when Britain abolished the slave trade with its colonies. When slavery itself showed no signs of disappearing, the Anti-Slavery Society was founded in Britain in 1823 under the leadership of Thomas Fowell Buxton, a member of Parliament. An example of an abolitionist rally. There were plenty of both black and white supporters of ending slavery. A History of Slavery Great Accomplishments Why They Matter Abolitionists have played a huge role in black history. If it weren't for their actions, African Americans might still be treated like property; or slavery would've lasted much longer, at least. While there were many issues with racism afterwards, the ending of slavery was a critical first step in treating everyone equally. Stop & Share
What is your topic? What did you learn about it? Which statement best summarizes lines 5-7? Which statement is the main idea of the second paragraph? italicized info chart list diagram Which main idea do the details in paragraph 7 support? Grasshopers have 14g of protein and only 5% of the fat found in lean ground beef. Termites and caterpillars are also great sources of iron. 1- Everyone should eat insects
2- Eating insects is healthy for you
3- Eating insects will help the environment Which statement below most effectively expresses the author’s opinion about eating insects? Everyone should eat bugs

60% of all culutures already eat bugs

The idea of eating bugs is disgusting

Many bugs contain a lot of calcium and iron Test Review • Fill in any 3 boxes
• Pick 1 classmate
• Share one of your squares
• Get 1 square from them
• Move on to another classmate Give One - Get One: Test Review Main Idea Summarize Paraphrase Organization Viewpoint Purpose Additional Info Bias Text Features Come up with 4 multiple choice questions using any article we've read
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