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Poetry Vocabulary

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by

Virginia Martin

on 5 March 2013

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Transcript of Poetry Vocabulary

Stanza In poetry, a stanza is a group of lines in a poem that are related to each other in the same way the sentences in a paragraph "go together." Internal Rhyme Just-Right Vocabulary Pie

The dictionary's a useful tool
My mother said to me
But if you want the perfect word
Climb the thesaurus tree!

The fruits in that tree are easy to see
(To observe, eyeball, espy)
Pick, choose, select, then bake
In a just-right vocabulary pie!

- Susan Moger Fog

The fog comes
on little cat feet.
It sits looking
over harbor and city
on silent haunches
and then moves on.

- Carl Sandburg (cc) photo by Jakob Montrasio Some poetry does not have a rhyme scheme; this is called free verse. Rhyme Scheme Poetry
Vocabulary The Cow The friendly cow all red and white,
I love with all my heart:
She gives me cream with all her might,
To eat with apple-tart. She wanders lowing here and there,
And yet she cannot stray,
All in the pleasant open air,
The pleasant light of day. And blown by all the winds that pass
And wet with all the showers,
She walks among the meadow grass
And eats the meadow flowers. - Robert Louis Stevenson To find the rhyme scheme in a poem, look at the last word of each line. The rhyme scheme can be anything...ABBA, ABCAB, ABCC, etc. Internal rhyme happens when some words within the line of verse rhymes. Jack and Jill

Jack and Jill went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water.
Jack fell down and broke his crown,
And Jill came tumbling after.

Up Jack got, and home did trot,
As fast as he could caper,
To old Dame Dob, who patched his nob
With vinegar and brown paper. Read the poem. How many stanzas does it have? What is the rhyme scheme? The Raven (Excerpt)

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore,
While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of someone gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
" 'Tis some visitor," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door;
Only this, and nothing more."

- Edgar Allan Poe Find the internal rhyme. I'm alone, on my own, and that's all I know
I'll be strong, I'll be wrong, oh but life goes on
I'm just a girl, trying to find a place in
This world Just a small town girl
Livin' in a lonely world
She took the midnight train goin' anywhere
Just a city boy
Born and raised in south Detroit
He took the midnight train goin' anywhere

A singer in a smoky room
Smell of wine and cheap perfume
For a smile they can share the night
It goes on and on and on and on

Strangers waiting
Up and down the boulevard
Their shadows searching in the night
Streetlight people
Living just to find emotion
Hiding somewhere in the night

Working hard to get my fill,
Everybody wants a thrill
Payin' anything to roll the dice
Just one more time
Some will win, some will lose
Some were born to sing the blues
Oh, the movie never ends
It goes on and on and on and on Line text consisting of a row of words repetition - using key words or phrases several times throughout the poem Rain

The rain is falling all around

It falls on field and tree,

It rains on the umbrellas here,

And on the ships at sea. - Robert Louis Stevenson
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