Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Terms to Know In Poetry and Prose

No description
by

Ashley Butterworth

on 12 August 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Terms to Know In Poetry and Prose

Figurative
Language

Skills
Complex
Meanings

Figurative
Language

Alliteration - the repetition of initial consonant sounds
Cliche - a phrase that is overused and requires no original thought
Hyperbole - over-the-top exaggeration or
overstatement
Apostrophe - when a speaker directly addresses someone or something that cannot answer back
Vocabulary Enhancers
Foreshadowing
Social
PERSONIFICATION - giving human qualities to non-human entities

PUN - a play on words for humorous or rhetorical effect
Anaphora
Rhetoric
the comparison of two dissimilar things without using "like" or "as"
the comparison of two things using "like" or "as"
Terms to Know
in Poetry and Prose

a story with two levels of meaning: the surface meaning and the symbolic
Allegory
a figure of speech that pairs two contradictory words
Oxymoron
a nicer or more pleasant way of saying something harsh or unpleasant
Euphemism
Metaphor
Simile
a reference, meant to call something to mind without directly referencing it
Allusion
IRONY
“From forth the fatal loins of these two foes;
A pair of star-cross’d lovers take their life.
Verbal - tension between what is said and what is really meant
Situational - plays with the difference between expectation and reality
Dramatic - when the audience knows something that the characters do not
the art of effective, persuasive speaking or writing
the repetition of phrases at the beginning of clauses
hints or suggestions about what's going to happen
- Shakespeare,
Romeo and Juliet
"But at the end of the day..."

or

"When everything is said and done..."
I have a million things to do!
"Twinkle, twinkle, little star, How I wonder what you are."
New Jersey is the armpit of America.
My grandma's chocolate chip and pop rocks cookies are like a party in your mouth!
Chocolate is my Achilles' heel.
C.S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is a famous religious allegory. The lion Aslan is a stand-in for Christ, and the character of Edmund, who betrays Aslan, is a Judas figure.
Jumbo shrimp. Student teacher. Awfully good.
Our 15-year-old parrot passed away yesterday.
Ethos, Logos, and Pathos
Every breath you take
Every move you make
Every bond you break
Every step you take
I'll be watching you

Every single day
Every word you say
Every game you play
Every night you stay
I'll be watching you

- The Police
The music from
Jaws
.
The tree danced gracefully in the wind.
A horse is a very stable animal.
Great, I ripped my new pants
Miss Butterworth does not like maple syrup.
In a scary movie, the character walks into a house and the audience knows the killer is in the house.
0:40
2:08
Full transcript