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to kill a mockingbird symbolism

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by

bella allison

on 9 November 2012

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Transcript of to kill a mockingbird symbolism

To Kill A Mockingbird Tree In To Kill A Mockingbird, the
tree symbolizes the communication
through Boo, Jem, and Scout.
The tree is Boo's only communication
to the outside world. When Jem and Scout find out the Boo's brother filled the hole of the tree with cement, he tells them that the tree is dying. When the children ask Atticus about the tree he tells them it doesn't appear to be dying, but that Mr. Radley knows his trees better than them. It is a giving tree, Jem and Scout receive
their gifts and it gives Boo an outlet,
because he is just a lonely man who has
been locked up in a house for most of his
life. This is a new adventure for all of them,
and when Mr. Radley Jr. plugs the hole, he is
cutting off his brother from the rest of the
world again. So the tree represents Boo's
lifeline to the outside world and the kids . When Scout and Jem are left out on
the porch, Scout tells Jem to come
inside but he tells her later. Later
she hears him crying. The fact that
Jem was so upset that the tree had
been filled shows how important the
tree is. This is a new adventure for all of them, and when Mr. Radley Jr. plugs the hole, he is cutting off his brother from the rest of the world again. So the tree represents Boo's lifeline to the outside world and the kids . The tree dying not only means that Boo's communication with the kids and the town of Maycomb being cut off once again, a part of Boo is dying with the tree. symbols of friendship, kindness and caring. Boo Radley
is aware of the children and enjoys watching their antics
in the neighborhood. He probably remembers his own
sad childhood and has a desire to share his things with
them as an expression of wanting to be friends and
wanting to please them. When Jem's pants get twisted
up in the fence, Boo is the one
who gets them loose for him,
mends them and leaves them
folded across the fence. I think he sort of relates with the
children because of his shyness with
adults and the fact that he has never
been able to interact well in the adult
world. Boo protects Scout by placing
a blanket over her when the neighbor's
house burns down and she is shivering
in the cold.
Full transcript