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How was the life of the First Nation affected by the arrival of the Europeans?

I made this presentation in the second term of 7th grade. It was a group project about the interactions between the First Nations and the Europeans.
by

Ritam Patel

on 17 November 2013

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Transcript of How was the life of the First Nation affected by the arrival of the Europeans?

The Interactions of the First Nations and the Europeans
How was the life of the First Nations affected by the Europeans?
What did they trade?
Why would the Europeans trade with the Natives?
Europeans trade with Natives wanted to obtain fur to sell in mother country
Main goal to earn wealth
Natives desired iron
Became reliant on guns
What is the relationship between the Europeans and First Nations?
Why were wars started between the Europeans and Natives?
Most common reason for wars between them
When Europeans colonized in New France they wanted Natives land
Natives wanted Europeans to colonize somewhere else
Example of war that started as a crisis was one that began in 1665
Why did the war happen between the Iroquois and the Huron with Champlain?
1609, Huron attacked Iroquois be of their trade because of their trade competition
Both hunted beavers
Huron wanted Champlain's help to defeat the Iroquois
Champlain named the lake after himself
How did the settlers diseases affect the First Nations?
1616, settlers brought smallpox
Smallpox was not in North America, First Nations had no resistance
Cholera, typhus and influenza
Many deaths
Why could the European weaponry defeat the First Nations?
Europeans had stronger and advanced weapons
Loud noise and quick shots scared the Natives
Europeans had pistols and muskets
Made by gunsmiths
First Nations used bows and spears
How did the First Europeans change the way of life for the First Nations?
Europeans traded with each other
They got what they were looking for from each other
The Europeans brought both good and bad and bad changes to the First Nations way of life
Most contact was peaceful
Helped each other in medical situations
The Europeans gave them metal
But not all change was good
Brought diseases to the First Nations killing off half the population of some tribes
In wars, Europeans killed whole tribes
Their relation was controversial
Thank you for listening to our presentation!
Why would the French convert the Natives?
At beginning the First Nations didn't want Europeans to colonize
Started off friendly; especially during disease period
Taught skills and remedies to the French
Europeans began to disrespect them, thus they did not always get along
French realized the Natives spiritual beliefs were very different
Jesuits are supposed to convert the Natives
Sometimes protection was given if they were converted
Main reason was to spread Christianity
Why might the French person live with a native for any reason?
Some may live with them to improve relations
Many courier de bois married native women
They live with them when they first come to North America
Couldn't have survived
Taught each other their ways of life
Why did the Europeans bring the fur trade to the First Nations?
The First Nations were perfect trading partners
Europeans wanted fish and furs, and First Nations were great hunters
Materials natives wanted were not as valuable as furs
Built trading posts
Some tribes passed on the goods of other tribes to the Europeans
First Nations did not have previous alliances with rival Europeans, and so were convinced to fight for specific countries
French want furs so bad, some people married the First Nation women, to get a better relationship with the people who provided them with furs
Not many French women married native men
Fur trade increased rivalries between tribes such as the Huron and Iroquois
If a tribe could expand its territory, it could catch more beavers, and therefore, get more goods from the Europeans
Dutch also played a part, set up with Mohawks, who extended into Huron territory
European diseases also took many native lives
To be successful, the fur trade needed natives and Europeans, and got just that
How would the Europeans cooperate with the First Nations?
Europeans and First Nations interacted with each other helpfully in many ways
When Europeans first arrived, First Nations helped weary, ill and weak Europeans to recover
Europeans brought fur trade to First Nations, Dutch worked with Mohawks, the French and British with others
Champlain helped Huron combat the Iroquois
First Nation bows could not stand against guns of the Europeans
First Nations used to make stone knives and hatchets
Traded furs for iron pots, knives, axes and blankets, clothes and rifles
Because of contact, European diseases killed nearly half of the First Nations
Mainly cooperated
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First Nations traded with Europeans to survive
French didn't want First Nations to think they had the same goods as the Dutch or English
So they traded brandy instead of alcohol
They traded furs like fox, lynx, otter, muskrat, bear and others
The one worth most was beaver
Europeans traded iron pots, axes, rifles
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Waiting for Shaquan's paragraph...
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