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To his Coy Mistress

The prezi to end all prezis
by

Morgan Taylor

on 20 February 2013

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Transcript of To his Coy Mistress

To His Coy Mistress Paraphrasing Stanza 1 "To his Coy Mistress" The Poem! If their lives were endless, being modest would not be a problem.
The speaker states that they could spend the infinite days together.
The speaker talks about where they would live: her by the Ganges River (a pristine, holy river) and he in the tides.
He then goes on to say that she could deny him sex as long as she wants. From the biblical flood until the conversion of the jews.
He would love her endlessly, complimenting her every feature before finally reaching her heart.
The speaker says that this is what she would deserve. An analysis by: Marc Good and Morgan Taylor Paraphrasing Stanza 3 Final Title analysis The title's real meaning is much more simple than what we originally believed.
It is a letter from an anonymous man to an anonymous mistress.
Mistress is simply his lover and coy suggests that she is pretending to be modest to appear more virtuous. Andrew Marvell Andrew Marvell was born on March 31, 1621 in Hull, Yorkshire. He also grew up there.
His father was a reverend.
He went to Trinity College in England where he completed his Master of Arts Degree.
After his father drowned he left the college and traveled around Europe.
He spoke many languages including English, Greek, Latin, Italian, Dutch, French, and Spanish.
He first worked as a tutor then became a politician.
During his time in office he wrote some of his most satirical poems.
However, none of these were published until after his death.
Marvell traveled to Holland, Russia, Sweden, and Denmark for diplomatic reasons.
He was killed by a sudden fever on August 18, 1678. Attitude, Rhyme Scheme and Theme Connotations Works Cited "Andrew Marvell." - Poets.org. N.p., 1997. Web. 19 Feb. 2013.


"Andrew Marvell: To His Coy Mistress. "Had We but World Enough and Time." (Cavalier Poem, Carpe Diem)." Andrew Marvell: To His Coy Mistress. "Had We but World Enough and Time." (Cavalier Poem, Carpe Diem). N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Feb. 2013.

"To His Coy Mistress Summary." Shmoop. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Feb. 2013.

"Stanza I (lines 1-20) Summary." Shmoop. N.p., n.d. Web. 09 Feb. 2013. Title Analysis This poem is a letter to the speaker's 'coy mistress.'
The word 'mistress' could mean she is simply the speaker's lover or a woman who is an adulterer.
Mistress might also suggest she is a higher authority than the speaker.
'Coy' implies that she is shy and timid.
Maybe she is naive and doesn't know what she is getting into? Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love's day;
Thou by the Indian Ganges' side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the Flood;
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires, and more slow.
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate.
But at my back I always hear
Time's winged chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found,
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long preserv'd virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust.
The grave's a fine and private place,
But none I think do there embrace. Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may;
And now, like am'rous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour,
Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power.
Let us roll all our strength, and all
Our sweetness, up into one ball;
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Thorough the iron gates of life.
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run. Had we but world enough, and time,
This coyness, lady, were no crime.
We would sit down and think which way
To walk, and pass our long love's day;
Thou by the Indian Ganges' side
Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide
Of Humber would complain. I would
Love you ten years before the Flood;
And you should, if you please, refuse
Till the conversion of the Jews.
My vegetable love should grow
Vaster than empires, and more slow.
An hundred years should go to praise
Thine eyes, and on thy forehead gaze;
Two hundred to adore each breast,
But thirty thousand to the rest;
An age at least to every part,
And the last age should show your heart.
For, lady, you deserve this state,
Nor would I love at lower rate. Paraphrasing Stanza 2 Now therefore, while the youthful hue
Sits on thy skin like morning dew,
And while thy willing soul transpires
At every pore with instant fires,
Now let us sport us while we may;
And now, like am'rous birds of prey,
Rather at once our time devour,
Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power.
Let us roll all our strength, and all
Our sweetness, up into one ball;
And tear our pleasures with rough strife
Thorough the iron gates of life.
Thus, though we cannot make our sun
Stand still, yet we will make him run.
But at my back I always hear
Time's winged chariot hurrying near;
And yonder all before us lie
Deserts of vast eternity.
Thy beauty shall no more be found,
Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound
My echoing song; then worms shall try
That long preserv'd virginity,
And your quaint honour turn to dust,
And into ashes all my lust.
The grave's a fine and private place,
But none I think do there embrace. So while we’re still young and alive, we should appreciate each other and live life to the fullest.
We should 'enjoy each others company' rather than dwell on the inevitability of death.
Since we can not stop time lets make it go faster. (Will be explained further in connotations) In the first stanza, his tone is an edged romanticism.
In the second stanza, he is more threatening.
The last stanza he is hopeful and he wants to savor time and enjoy life.
Rhyme scheme- the rhyme scheme of the poem follows a simple couplet pattern, varied with slant and irregular rhymes.
Themes - Time, Sex, Mortality, Freedom, and Confinement. Time always in the back of the speaker's mind forcing him to be realistic and to speed things up.
There is only vast nothingness after life. "Deserts of vast eternity" (line 24)
The mistress' present beauty will decay in death.
He won't be singing for/flirting with her when she dies.
And worms will steal the virginity that she refused him.
And any lust he felt for her will disappear.
The grave is a nice peaceful place, but love cannot exist there. Metaphor “Thou by the Indian Ganges' side/ Shouldst rubies find; I by the tide/ Of Humber would complain.”
When read, her dwelling in the Ganges conjures images of a slow river.
The second part of this line makes searching for rubies into a leisurely activity.
In addition, the Ganges river was a beautiful, pristine river during Andrew Marvell's time.
Basing her dwelling here emphasizes what she desires in their relationship: purity and a slow pace.
In contrast, the speaker dwells in the tides, which conjures images of movement and danger.
The dangerous and rough nature of the tides foreshadows his pragmatic threat in the second stanza
His dwelling place suggests that he wants a faster and more passionate relationship. “My vegetable love should grow/ Vaster than empires, and more slow.”
The interesting part of this metaphor is that the speaker doesn't seem happy to say it.
He doesn't want this slow-grown plant love. It hearkens to death, and the destruction of love in the grave. “Thus, though we cannot make our sun Stand still, yet we will make him run.”
This metaphor conjures up a rather strange image by using personification and imagery to embellish it.
The 'sun' is a simple metaphor for time
This is the main question in the poem. To escape the fear of death do you: live slowly and savor the growth of your life, or do you chase after time by experiencing as much as possible.
The mistress favors the former and the speaker the latter. Imagery “Time's winged chariot hurrying near” “Deserts of vast eternity.” “Then worms shall try That long preserv'd virginity,” “And while thy willing soul transpires At every pore with instant fires “Now let us sport us while we may; And now, like am'rous birds of prey,” Paradox “Rather at once our time devour, Than languish in his slow-chapp'd power”
The speaker wants to 'eat' his time at once in order to survive and live.
However time can also eat him instead, and this makes him want to be rid of it.
What the speaker depends on for life is the very thing he wants to get rid of, creating a paradox. (which as we will read later is a big tool in metaphysical poetry.) Metaphysical Poetry Looks back on ones life
Reflects
It has to do with the existance of life
Metaphysical poetry asks
What is out there?
What is reality? Time Period There was a major change in philosophy
There were various artists
People were especially creative during this time period
The period had many metaphysical writers and poets
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