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World Music

World Music Unit for S2 covering African, Indian, Latin American and Spanish Music
by

Ellen Smith

on 4 March 2016

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Transcript of World Music

World Music
Location 1
Africa:
Today's Aims:

To
explore
different elements of the
African Culture
To look at different
features (concepts)
found in
African Music
To
perform
a Congolese folk song...in
three
parts!
Final Destination
Location 2
Our Mission:
Our aims for this unit are:

To
explore
different types of music from all corners of the globe.
To
improve
our
performance
on our solo instruments
To
apply
our knowledge of different musical styles to
inventing
.
Mission Accomplished?
"But how do we know we've accomplished our mission?" I hear you cry!
We will know we have been
successful
when:

We can
identify
various styles in a piece of
world music
we can
perform
with on our solo instruments with
confidence
and
fluency
We have completed an
inventing
task using the
Arabic Scale
Lesson Starter:
4 pics 1 Word:
Bonus: which famous politician (who is linked to these pictures) passed away recently?
First things first:
What do you know about Africa already? Discuss with your shoulder partner, and write it down in your jotter

(Remember, Heading and Date)
With some of these points in mind,
listen
to this clip
Write down any
prominent features
in your jotter:
African Music:
FUN FACTS
One of the main elements of African Music is
Rhythm
African People use a variety of different
drums
.
Most of the drums are
hand made
from materials found
locally
.
The Djembe
The

Djembe
is one of the main drums used:

It is made out of a
hollowed
out tree
trunk
, the part which is said to contain the
soul
of the tree.

The top is made out of
Goat Skin
which is
pulled tight
and held in place by
rope
. How tight the skin is pulled can alter the
pitch
.
Skin
Trunk
Rope
Bongo Drums
Bongo Drums
are another type of drums which are
popular
in African music
They are
similar
to the
Djembe
in the way they are made, except they consist of
two
smaller drums
joined together
.
Bongo's are usually positioned on the players lap.
A form of Communication?
Drums were used to
imitate
different
sounds
and sometimes even
words

Using combinations of different
pitches
and
rhythms
, drums allowed people to
communicate
between tribes.

These complex rhythm patterns are called
Polyrhythms.
Have a listen to this:
How else did they communicate?
This is where I need your help. For the next part of the lesson, we're gonna need our voices!
Banaha
Part 1:
Part 2:
Part 3:
Si si, si si
Do la dah
Yaku sine la du banaha
Banah, Banah,
Yaku sine la du banaha
Ah Banaha
Yaku sine la du banaha
X2
X2
X2
Let's Recap:
Today we have:
Explored
different aspects of
African Culture
Looked at some of the
instruments
found in
African Music
and how they are used
Have
performed
the Cogolese Folk Song '
Banaha
' with
confidence
.
How do you feel you did?
Mission Accomplished
?
Bork
Bork
Bork
in your Jotters, write down the word which links these four pictures.
26/08/2014
Lesson Starter:
01/09/2014
Fill in the blanks in your jotters:

A Djembe is a type of drum from ..............

It is made up of a ............skin pulled tight

over the hollowed out ......... of a tree. This

is said to contain the ............... of the tree.
Let's Recap:
Who can tell me something we covered last week?
Falsetto:
A
concept
we touched on last week,
Falsetto
is the name of a
vocal technique
where a
male
singer uses the
upper
part of his
voice
.
African

Male
singers frequently use
falsetto
when
singing
, but this guy also has a crack at it:
Polyrhythms:
Poly
is the
greek
word for
many
, so when we talk about
Polyrhythms
, we are describing
many
different
rhythms
being played at the
same time
.
Can you think of any other words which begin with
Poly
?
Let's Travel on...
4 Pics, 1 Word
INDIA
Today's Mission:
Today we are going to:
Explore
the
culture
of
India
Explore
features
(concepts) of
Indian Music
Continue with
Banaha
and even add
drums!
Mission Accomplished
? By the end of the lesson we will:
Be able to
identify
a
sitar
in a piece of music
be ready to record a first take of
Banaha
Have a listen to this next clip:
Jai Ho (you are my destiny) - A.R Rahman and the Pussycat Dolls
Think about the rhythm and the harmony
But before we go any further...
Let's talk about the culture of India....
India has a large population...
1.2 Billion!
A Feast for the senses...
Diversity of Religion...
Contrast in Class...
But what's
Religion
got to do with music?
Saraswathi
is the Hindu Goddess of Knowledge
People in India (not just Hindus) hold
Education
(knowledge) in
high regard
Education encompasses
music
, and the Indian people also hold
music
in very
high regard
Indian Music:
Indian Classical Music
is over
2000
years old
There are two types:
Carnatic
- from
South
India
Hindustani
- from the
North
This is a common occurrence...
Indian music is
directly

derived
from
Religion
.
Any questions so far?
Quick Recap:
The
culture
in India is very
diverse
The people of India hold
Education
and
music
in
high regard
Religion
and
Music
are very closely
linked
To finish?
Using the
post-it
notes, write down
one
thing you learned in today's lesson which you
didn't know
when you came in to the class.


Let's have a listen...
Is the music
major
or
minor
(
happy
or
sad
)?
What is the
name
of the
string
instrument featured at the beginning?
Some things we looked at last week:
India is a '
feast
for the senses'
There is a very
diverse
variety of religions
In terms of the
culture
:
India has a
huge
population
There is a
significant
contrast in class
In terms of the music...
Indian
Classical Music
is over
2,000
years old

Much of it is
derived
directly from
religion

There are
two
types:
Hindustani

(
North
India)

Carnatic

(
South
India)
And one of the instruments we looked at:
Today's mission?
We have an action packed lesson today, so keep on track
In today's lesson we are going to:
Further
explore
the various elements of
Indian Music
Look at the
significance
of the
Bollywood
film industry in
India
Perfect our performance of
Banaha
How do we know when we've accomplished our mission?
we will be able to
identify
a
Tabla
in a piece of music
We will be able to explain
why
Indian music sounds
different
to our ears.
We will have
improved
upon our performance of
Banaha
Verse:
Aaja aaja jinday
shamiyaanay kay talay,
Aaja zaree waalay neelay
aasay manay kay talay
(Jai Ho! Jai Ho)
Intro:
x2
Chorus:
Jai Ho Jai Ho Jai Ho Jai Ho
Ratti ratti sachi
menay ja-hanuh gaveye heh
Nachuh Nachu koy-lo
pe ra-hatuh bitaayi heh

Akhi yon ki neen
d'menay fookoh se ooh dadi
Geenay geenay taarey menay
unguhli jalayi heh
Bridge:
(Jai Ho! Jai Ho!)
Jai Ho - A.R Rahman
Jai Ho! Jai Ho!
Mission Accomplished?
Strictly Come LISTENING:
As you watch this next clip,
listen
to the music. what kind of
instruments
can you hear?
Y Viva Espana!
Vamos! Ahora!
To finish of the listening part of our unit, we are going to:
Undertake a whistle-stop tour of
Spain
and
South
America
Explore
the origins of
Latin American
music
Explore
some
features
of this type of music
We will know we have been successful in this when:
We can
explain
the
influence
of
Spanish
music on
Latin American
music
We can
identify
various
instruments
in a piece of music.
Flamenco
Dancing (like that which we saw in the Strictly clip) is a very
popular
type of dance in
Spain
.

Flamenco
dancers are usually
accompanied
by a
Flamenco Band
, which consists of
singers
and
guitarists
.

Although

Flamenco
dancers can sometimes use
Castanets
, though it is more
common
for the
Sevillanas
dancers to use them.
'
Castanets
?' I hear you cry?
Castanets
are small, hand-held
percussion
instruments, usually made of wood

They make a distinctive '
click
' sound when hit together

Castanets
can also be used in
Classical music
. Have a listen out for them in this next clip.
Man she loves dem Castanets!
Tocar

la

Guitarra!
The
guitar
is also a
popular
instrument, found in nearly
all

Spanish Music

The
guitar
in part
originated
in
Spain

In
Spanish Music
, it is used mainly for
rhythmic
effect.
Let's put all these concepts together:
Bem Bem Maria - Gipsy Kings
How does the
singing
here
compare
to
vocal
music from
other
parts of the world?
What have we got so far?
But enough of that, let's travel on...
Spanish music
frequently features
guitar
, which is played in a very
rhythmic
fashion
Castanets
(small, hand held
percussion
) are also used, both in
Classical
Music and in
Folk
Music (and for dancing too)
The
singing
uses
microtones
, and is
similar
to the style of singing found in
India
.
Don't Choo want me baby?
Discuss
with your
shoulder partner
the
similarities
and
differences
?
In a nut shell...
Hey, wait a minute!
If it is similar to spanish music, why are we in Mexico?
When America was
colonised
by the
Spanish
in
1492
(led by
Christopher Columbus
, they brought over their
culture
.

They inevitably brought over their
musical

styles
too.

The
existing
styles which were present at the time began to gradually
mix
with the
'new'
music coming across form Spain, and thus,
Latin American Music
was born.
Escucha!
Latin American Music:
Latin American
music still uses a lot of
guitar
(The Doritos
Mariachis
)

However, due to
influences
from
African
music, it is much more
rhythmic
and uses a lot more
percussion
and
Brass

Latin American
music is widely used to
accompany
various
dances
, such as
Tango
,
Salsa
and
Samba
, and each dance has its own
style
of music.
Some famous Latin American Singers.
Brazil
Mexico
What's the prominent wind instrument?
The Panpipes.
As Shakira
Columbian
, the
panpipes
fit in rather nicely with her UK debut single.

The
panpipes
are a
wind instrument
which originated in the
Andes
.

They are usually made up of
cane
or
bamboo
which is cut into
different sizes
and strapped
together
.
You have reached your destination:
To finish off our
whistle-stop
tour of
South America
, we have arrived at the
Caribbean
, home of the steel pans.

The
Steel Pans
(which originated from
Trinidad and Tobago
) are made from
used oil drums.

The top is
hammered
and shaped in such a way that
different notes
can be played, depending on which part of the
Steel Pan
is
struck
.
The finished product: Recognise this?
Notice how the
percussionist

strikes
different parts of the drum to play
different notes
?
Banaha
Part 1:
Part 2:
Part 3:
Si si, si si
Do la dah
Yaku sine la du banaha
Banah, Banah,
Yaku sine la du banaha
X2
X2
X2
Ah Banaha
Yaku sine la du banaha
Jet Lag kicking in?
I can define and identify Pan Pipes in an excerpt of music.
I am ready to tackle the Gipsy Kings next week!
I can define and identify Steel Pans in an excerpt of music
Lesson Starter:
06/02/14
4 pics 1 word
Today's Mission:
Let's recap:
So far, we have
explored
various
concepts
from the following places:
Africa
India
Spain
Latin America
We have also been working on a
Congolese
Folk Song,
Banaha
Can you name me any concepts?
Ready to get inventive?
Today we are going to:
Explore
some of the different
modes
used in
Arabic Music
Apply
this to an
inventing
task using the handouts
Mission Successful
? By the end of the lesson we are aiming to:
Have
composed
a short passage using the
Arabic Scale
Have
increased
our
confidence
both in
performing
and
inventing
.
Ears Peeled!
While you're
listening
, think about how this
music
is
similar
to what we've
heard
before.
"Walk Like an Egyptian..."
Egypt
is probably best known for its
fascinating history
. What do you know about it?
The Arab World
Egypt
is part of what's known as
The Arab World
, pictured above.
The Arab World
consists of
22
different
countries
.
Arabian Music
Arabian Music,
like
Indian
and even
spanish
music is
composed differently
to
Western
Music
Arabian Music
uses what we call
modes
(
Maqam
) rather than scales, and there are around
40
!
Modal Music
doesn't really sound
major
or
minor
, as the tones and
semitones
in the scales are
arranged differently
.
Take look at your hand outs.
Let's get Clappy Happy!
Let's have a look at the
Rajaz Rhyhthm
:
Arabic Music
is also features many different
rhythms
. The
Rajaz Rhythm
pictured above is intended to
imitate
the sound of
Camel Hooves
in the sand.
Less Talk, More Glock!
Beaters at the ready? Let's play!
The Arabic Scale
If you're playing the
glock
, make sure to
BOUNCE
your beaters
Let's get inventive!
In groups of
three
are
four
,
follow
the instructions on your
handouts
to
compose
a piece of
Arabian Music
!
How did we do?
I can play the
Rajaz Rhythm
and the
Arabic Scale
with
confidence
.
I can use various
instruments
to
compose
using the
Arabic Scale
I worked
co-operatively
with my group to
perform
our
composed
passage of
Arabic Music
Su-Perb
Lesson Starter
Heads Up!
Turn to Unit 3 in your Profile booklets and choose one of the world music concepts...
20/03/2014
Today's Aims
Our main tasks for today are:
To undertake a few short
revision
activities
To
rehearse
Banaha to perfection
We will know we have been successful when:
We can
identify
various
features
(concepts) of
World Music
in an excerpt
We can
perform
Banaha with
confidence
.
We can
reflect
on our
performance
.
But before we go any further...
Have a
look
(and a
listen
) at this next clip. What do you notice the
sitar
playing is doing to the
strings
?
What's the score?
When we push or
bend
the string up or down on an instrument, it
alters
the
pitch
slightly. This is known as

Pitch Bend
, and can be found in all genres of music.
Next up:
What's in the bag?
Listen up!
Ready for some more?
Banaha
Part 1:
Part 2:
Part 3:
Si si, si si
Do la dah
Yaku sine la du banaha
Banah, Banah,
Yaku sine la du banaha
X2
X2
X2
Ah Banaha
Yaku sine la du banaha
Mission Accomplished?
I can
name
various
concepts
found in different genres of music from all over the
world
I can
identify
these in a piece of
music
with
confidence
I can
perform
a
congolese
folk song (Banaha) with
confidence
Su-Perb!
Banaha
Part 1:
Part 2:
Part 3:
Si si, si si
Do la dah
Yaku sine la du banaha
Banaha, Banaha,
Yaku sine la du banaha
X2
X2
X2
Ah Banaha
Yaku sine la du banaha
There are
two
types of
Classical music
,
Carnatic
and
Hindustani
Everyone still following?
Any Questions?
Use thumbs up/thumbs down!
Up on your feet, let's get that voice warmed up and ready to sing!
But that's enough talk!
Mission Successful?
We've covered a lot in today's lesson. How do you feel?
I have
acquired
an
understanding
of Indian
Culture

I understand how this
influenced
Indian
Music

I can
identify
a
sitar
in an excerpt of
music
We have also recorded Banaha!
Let's focus on one of India's most distinctive Instruments:
The Sitar:
The
sitar
is a seven stringed instrument
native
to
India
.
It has a very distinctive '
twangy
' sound.
It is usually used for
improvisation
.
We've got a lot to cover, so stay focused
Baila Me!
Ver la Samba!
La Danza de Samba!
Samba dancing
is a popular past-time in Latin America, which originates from
Brazil
.

The music is very
rhythmic
and
upbeat
, with a
large percussion section
as the main focus

The music itself is in
2/4 time
, however there are three steps in every bar, which gives more of a 3/4 feel
Have a listen to this next song which is influenced by the
samba
style of music, and notice the many different
percussion instruments
We are one (ole ola)
What about this one?
La Danza de Salsa
Salsa dancing is also another popular dance style, however it is said to have originated in
New York
in the
70's
.

Both the
dance
and the
music
have strong
Latin American influences
, with the dancing in particular
evolving
from the
Cha Cha
and the
Mambo
.

Like Samba music, Salsa music is also very
rhythmic
, however a defining feature of Salsa is its
prominent
use of
piano
.
Listen to this next clip and pick out the piano line
Ready to travel on?
In today's lesson we:
Consolidate our knowledge of the origins of Latin American Music
Explore the various types of Dance music
Continue with our solo performing
We will know we have been successful when:
We can
identify
whether a piece of music is
Salsa
or
Samba
We are able to
justify
our answers with
reference
to relevant
concepts
How about this:
Many elements of
Salsa
music can be compared to
Jazz

In the last clip, we heard the
piano
playing a
repeated melodic pattern
(what we call an
ostinato
or a
riff
), whilst the various instruments
improvised
(made up the music on the spot) over top.

This kind of playing is very
in keeping
with the way in which
Jazz
musicians perform, and as we know, Blues and Jazz
originated
in the
U.S.A
It's all linked...
Bring it all back now: Let's
recap
-
In today's lesson we have:
Explored
the music used in both
Salsa
and
Samba
dancing

Identified
the
distinctive
features of each - can you name any?

Progressed
with our solo
performing
Next week, we're off to the
Andes
!
Answer me this?
Anoushka Shankar
The Sitar:
A
seven
stringed instrument
native
to India with a distinctive '
twangy
'

sound. Used a lot for
improvisation
Have a peerie listen
How does it sound for you?
We don't hear it like that over here!
Indian Music sounds funny to our ears because it
isn't composed
in the
same
way as
Western Music
.
Indian Music uses lot's of
different scales
- more than just
major
and
minor
.
As well as
Tones (full steps)
and
Semitones (half steps)
, Indian musicians use the
notes in between
- these are called
Microtones
.
Remember last week, we touched on
Pitch Bend?
Listen out for it in this clip:
Bonus: We can hear the
sitar
, but what else is there?
The Tabla:
Like
the
bongos
, the
Tabla
also consists of
two drums
.
The
Tabla

differs
from the
bongos
in
sound
, because when
struck
,
different parts
of the
Tabla
make
different sounds
.
The
Tabla
is also used for improvising, and has a distinctive '
boing
' sound.
Think we've got that so far?
me me me me?
Translation: Any Questions?
Bollywood
? Don't you mean
Hollywood
?
Bollywood
(a play on the word
Hollywood
) is a
nickname
for the
Indian

Film
industry, which
orginated
in
B
ombay

Bollywood
is an even
bigger
film industry
than

Hollywood
, making over
800
films a year (that's
twice as much
!)

Bollywood
films are made very
quickly
, sometimes the
actors
on the set can be
shooting scenes
for up to
four different films
at a time
So what are the films like?
Bollywood
films are very
colourful
and feature lots of
extravagant

costumes
which are changed frequently

There is also
A LOT
of
singing
and
dancing

Bollywood
films usually follow the
standard
story line of
boy meets girl
and the two must fight for
approval
from their
families

Romance
is a big element, but it is
tastefully
portrayed through
dance
and
song
.
Let's Have a look:
So, what have we got now?
Banaha
Part 1:
Part 2:
Part 3:
Si si, si si
Do la dah
Yaku sine la du banaha
Banaha, Banaha,
Yaku sine la du banaha
X2
X2
X2
Ah Banaha
Yaku sine la du banaha
Indian Music sounds unusual to our ears because it is composed in a different way.
The Tabla is also
native
to India
Bollywood (an even bigger industry than Hollywood) is a popular form of entertainment
As well as the Sitar, the tabla is also native to India, and the two are frequently played together.
But that's enough from me!
Up on your feet, shake out those arms and legs, its time to get
Busy with the Fizzy
!
Bring it all back now: Let's Recap -
We've had another action packed lesson - how do you feel?
I can
identify
a
Tabla
in a piece of music
I can
explain
why
Indian music
sounds
different
to our ears
I can
identify
and
describe
some of the main elements of
Bollywood
Films.
I am
confident
in performing
Banaha
Any Questions?
To finish?
Using the
post-it
notes, write down
one
thing you learned in today's lesson which you
didn't know
when you came in to the class.


What's on today?
Oh take me back to the start:
"Baby I would climb the
Andes
only..." -
Shakira

Whenever, Wherever
The Andes run all the way down through South America
Machu Picchu
Ancient Incan Settlement
Andes Mountains
To round off the listening part of our Latin American Unit:
We are aiming to:
Consolidate
our Knowledge of
Latin American
Dance music
Explore the various types of
instruments
found in
Rural Latin America
Continue with our
Solo Performing
We will know we have been successful when:
We can
define
and
Identify

panpipes
We can
define
and
Identify

Steel Pans
we can
justify
our answers with
reference
to relevant
concepts
What do we remember from last week? Write it down!
Let's explore that further:
But what about the
Music
?
"What's that hiding under my seat, is it a monster?''
''No, its the lesson starter...''
You may have noticed two sheets at either side of the classroom? If you look under your seats, some of you will have an envelope with a question mark on it. What's inside?
So what's in store for today?
Another action packed lesson is ahead of us, so keep the focus!
Our main aims are:
To
explore
the various ways in which the
tabla
is played
To try our hand at playing some basic
Indian rhythms (tala)
To perform an
Indian pop song
- I think you might know it!
We will know we have been successful when:
We can play two different
Tala
rhythms from the
tintal
cycle
We can add this our
performance
of an
Indian pop song

Think we can do it? Let's go!
Spotlight: Tala
Last week, we talked about the
Tabla
, a percussion instrument. Although it is usually used for
improvising
, there are
set rhythm cycles
which the player will follow. These are called
Tala
. Let's watch our old friend Ravi explain it in more detail:
Think we could do that? Let's have a bash (literally)
Below is one of the more basic
Tala
patterns, from the
Tintal
cycle. Following the pattern on screen,
tap
it out on your desk and
say
the
corresponding word
aloud:
Now try this one:
But we don't wanna stop there!
Everybody up on your feet! Get
moving
, get
shaking
, its time to get our
Indian Pop
on!
This one is a little more
complex
- below is a an extract from
Gat
, a
variation
of the
tintal
cycle
Let's give it a go
A.R Rahman
Think we can put it together?
Let's
add
the
Tala
Rhythms to the
song
. Remember, keep it
steady
.
- I
understand
that Indian music uses
various rhythms called
Tala

- I can play
rhythms
from the
tintal
cycle

- I can perform
Jai Ho
in Indian with

confidence
.
Any Questions?
On your post-its, write down
one thing
which you
learned
in today's lesson which you
didn't know
when you came into the class
this morning
.
What's in store today?
We want to get into performing fairly sharpish so:
- Today' we're aiming to consolidate our knowledge of the
concepts covered in this unit

We're going to do this by

- Engaging in some short revision activities
- Applying our knowledge of them to performing
First up: FREEZE!
Salsa
OR
Samba
Same again:
So what do we have to remember?
Samba
is most recognisable for its prominent use of percussion. When we have many rhythms together, this is called ............ rythms.
Salsa
also feature percussion, however it's main focus is piano OR guitar, which often plays an ............... (repeated rhythmic or melodic pattern)
Concept bingo!
Take
three
pieces of paper from the bag, and keep your ears peeled. If you hear your concept in the excerpt, shout
OLE
! (or, ya know,
bingo
...)
These fine young people are playing samba drums. What word could we use to describe what they're playing? Have a listen:
What kind of dance is this?
What is the piano doing?
Lastly, what concept would you say the trumpet is playing at the start?
Is that us?
There's one concept in your booklets which we haven't covered. How would you describe the method of moving a string to change the pitch?
Have a listen in this well known song:
So how we doing?
I understand th
Ears Peeled - which instrument/style do you hear?
Spotlight - Pitch Bend
Watch the sitar player's fingers - what is she doing to the strings? How does it sound?
What's the score?
When we push or
bend
the string up or down on an instrument, it
alters
the
pitch
slightly. This is known as

Pitch Bend
, and can be found in all genres of music.
Jamaica
Reggae
What is it?
Listen up:
How does this song make you feel?
Key features:
Reggae is well known for being laid back.

The music is usually Syncopated, with the emphasis or accent on the 2nd and 4th beat.

The music will also feature a repeated rhythmical or musical pattern - a riff/ostinato
Let's Recap:
Reggae music origin in Jamaica

The music can be described as 'laid back'

The music features Syncopation, accented notes and Riffs/Ostinatos.
Reggae is a style of music which became popular in the 60's.

It originates from Jamaica in the West Indies, and is influenced by both jazz and even rock music

The songs usually talk about people's lives and experiences.
Full transcript