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Illegal Immigration in the United States

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Tati Hyman

on 11 November 2013

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Transcript of Illegal Immigration in the United States

Cons
Pros
The number of illegal immigrants in the United States was estimated at 11.5 million in 2011.
Statistics
Sixty-three percent of the illegal immigrant population (approximately 6.8 million) entered the United States before 2000.
An estimated 13.9 million people — including 4.7 million children — live in families in which the head of household or the spouse is an unauthorized immigrant.
In 2011, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement removed 396,906 illegal immigrants from the United States. Of those, 216,698 (nearly 55%) had been convicted of felonies or misdemeanors.
About 3% work in agriculture; 33% work in service industries; 16% have jobs in construction and 17% work in production, installation and repair.
Areas of Origin
Distribution in the U.S.
Family Life
Why is Illegal Immigration a Problem?
The Dream Act
What is it?
Arizona Law- SB1070
What is it?
The Controversy
Obama's Deferred Action
Our Proposed Solution
Tighten border control to prevent more illegal immigration
Have an amnesty program for illegal immigrants in the US that are not covered by the Dream Act or Deferred Action Plan
been in the U.S for 5+ years (as proof i.e. earliest piece of mail/documentation)
speaks or understands basic English
has a legal family member in the US and proof of relation
no criminal record (cross country background check will be done)
Must obtain a job within a 1 year period to pay taxes
Once amnesty has been granted...
Amnesty can be voided if...
Within 1 year the immigrant does not acquire a job or a crime is committed
ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION IN THE UNITED STATES
Legislation
Requirements
Immigration Today
Requires all immigrants over the age of 14 who remain in the US for more than 30 days have to register with the government and to carry their registration documents at all times
Police officers are required to determine if someone is an illegal immigrant using "reasonable suspicion."
"Reasonable suspicion" or racial profiling?
Legislation first proposed in 2001 by Dick Durbin and Orrin Hatch
Violation of legal Arizona residents' rights
Development, Relief, Education for Alien Minors Act
Requirements for the DREAM Act
To be eligible for the Dream Act the "alien" must:
Prove they entered the country before the age of 16
Prove they have resided in the country for more than 5 years
Be between the ages of 12 and 35
Have graduated from an American high school, obtained a GED, or been accepted into College
"Good moral character"
Past Immigration Policies

Bracero Program of 1942-1964
Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986
1996 Illegal Immigrant Reform Act
2000 Legal Immigration Family Equity
(LIFE) Act
Passed Congress several times
Endorsed by President Obama
Covers approximately 1.4 million people
Jim Shee is a plaintiff in the ACLU’s case challenging SB 1070, Arizona’s notorious immigration law. Shee is an American citizen of Chinese and Spanish descent and a lifelong Arizona resident. After the law passed, he was stopped twice by police and asked to show his “papers.” He now carries his passport with him at all times in case he is again pulled over and required to prove his right to be in his own country and city.
Jim Shee
For eligibility:
Have come to the U.S. before the age of 16
Lived in country for 5 years before June 15
Is currently in school, has graduated from high school, obtained a GED, or been honorably discharged from the armed forces
"Good moral character"
Under the age of 30

NOT a path to obtain legal residency

Those who fulfill the requirements are given a renewable two year work authorization
Meet Angela
Born in South Korea
Motivated college student
3.5 GPA in High School
Wishes to contribute to American society
Called America home
Wishes for basic opportunities
Less paying jobs for Americans
Do not pay taxes but use government services paid by taxpayer's money
Crime rates increase
Over population in major cities
Full transcript