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INNOVARCH Public Archaeology Kalmar 2016

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Cornelius Holtorf

on 15 September 2016

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Transcript of INNOVARCH Public Archaeology Kalmar 2016

By Cornelius Holtorf
Public Archaeology as Applied Archaeology
Center for Applied Heritage
What is Applied Archaeology?


Applied Archaeology is at the same time
Applied Cultural Heritage
.

Applied Archaeology is to
use the potential of archaeology to transform society.

(It is thus more than to conduct archaeology in society or to inform society about archaeology and its results.)
PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY IN SOCIETY
NEW APPROACHES -- NEW PARTNERS -- NEW CHALLENGES
$1.25
Presented by INNOVARCH (Erasmus+)
Vol XCIII, No. 311
https://lnu.se/en/cah
Innovating Training Aims for Public Archaeology:
Barcelona, Warsaw, Rethymno, Kalmar
Applied Archaeology means
to learn
through
the past rather than to learn
about
the past
(Bridging Ages)
to move
"from talking to action"
(Anders Högberg + Ebbe Westergren)

Applied Archaeology may require to work with
new partners
, taking on
new challenges
, acquiring
additional expertise
.

Applied Archaeology is concerned with
the future
.
Applied Archaeology - How it works in practice
Nuclear Waste
Collaboration with SKB
Research towards improved and extended services for society
Contract Archaeology
Experimental Heritage
Full transcript