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How to Read Literature like a Professor Ch. 23

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S K

on 11 April 2013

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Transcript of How to Read Literature like a Professor Ch. 23

How to Read Literature like a Professor
    Chapter 23: It’s Never Just Heart Disease... General Meanings of
Heart Disease This chapter is about how when an author mentions heart disease in a story, it's never just heart disease. Since the heart represents practically all emotions, when the heart has troubles it could be interpreted as many different things. Usually the characters with heart disease are never happy with life. Summary - Heart trouble indicates emotional burdens. Symbolism of the Heart - The heart is the symbolic vessel of emotion. Works Given: - The Good Soldier by  Ford Madox Ford (1915).
- The Iliad & The Odyssey by Homer
- The Remorseful Day by Colin Dexter (1999)
- The Wench is Dead by Colin Dexter (1989)
- "The Man of Adamant" by Nathaniel Hawthorne (1837)
- Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
- Lolita’s Humbert Humbert by Vladimir Nabokov Other Works: - "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin (1894)
- When Crickets Cry by Charles Martin 1. bad love
2. loneliness
3. cruelty
4. disloyalty 5. pain
6. suffering
7. regret
8. something amiss at the center of things 1. loyalty
2. trust
3. love
4. fidelity  
5. honesty - The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford (1915). - The Iliad & The Odyssey by Homer - The Remorseful Day by Colin Dexter (1999) - The Wench is Dead by Colin Dexter (1989) - "The Man of Adamant" by Nathaniel Hawthorne (1837) - Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad (1900) - Lolita’s Humbert Humbert by Vladimir Nabokov "The Story of an Hour" by Kate Chopin (1894) - When Crickets Cry by Charles Martin Couples on a trip. Edward is married but has two affairs while on the trip. Both women have heart troubles and both die. (infidelity) In both the books by Homer, his characters say that other characters they have 'a heart of iron.' Iron being the newest and hardest metal known in the late Bronze Age. (loyalty) and Morse is a genius but drinks too much, he's lazy, he was hospitalized and has bad luck with women but his major problem is that he is lonely. When he finally gets close, he has a heart attack. It shows the pain, suffering, the loneliness and regret. The man hates humanity so he moves into a cave to avoid all human contact. The cave he chooses has water, that’s just stiff with calcium so that at the end of the story his heart is turned to stone. (bad love, loneliness) Jim promised his leader, Doramin, that if his plan kills any of his people, Jim will forfeit his own life. When it does, Doramin shoots him through the chest, in the heart. A man who cared so much for others, showing loyalty dies. (loyalty, honesty) Humbert is a villain thrown in jail for cruelty, statutory rape and murder. In jail right before he's released he dies, somewhat unexpectedly , of heart failure. (cruelty) Reese's wife, Emma has heart troubles and to save her he becomes a renowned cardiovascular surgeon. A heart is available but he gives to another women with a family instead. Emma dies. He disappears and after five years he meets a little girl, Annie, with the same heart disease, who's selling lemonade in order to make money for a new heart. In the end, Reese gets Annie a new heart and saves her life. Louise Mallard suffers from heart problems. She is told that her husband died, in a railroad disaster. She locks herself in her room to mourn. However, she begins to feel an unexpected sense of freedom. She believes that she benefits from his death. At the end of the story, her husband returns home unharmed. The shock of his appearance kills her. The doctors who examine her say that she died of happiness.
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