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Narrative Writing

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Patrick Wilcox

on 22 February 2016

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Transcript of Narrative Writing

1995
2000
2010
1990
2005
TELLING STORIES
Engage the reader
Different perspectives
...The perspective from which a story is told.

Still not good enough? Let's look at this definition from another angle!
Painting a picture (with words!)
Every good story needs a
setting
that feels real to the reader. To make that setting feel real, writers use sensory language.

Sensory

language
, also known as imagery, deals with sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste.

No one sense is better than the others. All are needed to ground the reader. Otherwise the reader would be floating in complete and utter nothingness!
Characterization
Writing Meaningful Dialogue
Dialogue is a written
conversation
between two or more
characters
.

Meaningful dialogue is
streamlined
, meaning all the
boring
parts of normal conversation are removed--introductors (hi, hello, etc.) and fillers (uh, um, etc.).

Meaningful dialogue also has
three
functions.
Smooth Progression
All about the Ending
Let's DEFINE P.O.V.
...Is the narrator a character within the story? Do they use the pronouns
I
,
WE
,
ME
or
US
?

...Does the narrator address the reader directly? Does the narrator refer to the reader as
YOU
a lot?

...Is the character outside of the story? Do they use the pronouns HE, SHE, THEY, HIM, HER, or THEM as well as characters' names.
Let's IDENTIFY P.O.V.
Story
Your Second Goal:
Create your own setting using sensory language
Your Goal
Identify setting description on Stephen King's short story "1408"
What items does the narrator...
First
, read through your story and pick out spots where you might be able to develop the setting further.

Next
, add setting description using sensory details from at least 3 of the 5 senses. Highlight these additional sentences
YELLOW
.
...The process by which the personality of a character is revealed to the reader.

There are TWO types of characterization: DIRECT and INDIRECT

DIRECT flat out
tells
the audience about the character's personality

INDIRECT
shows
the audience the character's personality in FIVE ways.
First, let's DEFINE characterization
Watch these clips of animated films from Pixar and answer the following question:
How are Darla, Carl, and Riley characterized? Focus on the aspects of STEAL as well as an explanation.
Next, let's IDENTIFY characterization
Format Dialogue Correctly
I'm going to make him an offer he can't refuse Vito said

I love the smell of napalm in the morning Lieutenant Kilgore said

Go ahead Harry said make my day

After all Scarlett tomorrow is another day
"I'm going to make him an offer he can't refuse," Vito said.
"I love the smell of napalm in the morning," Lieutenant Kilgore said.
"Go ahead," Harry said, "make my day."
"After all," Scarlett said, "tomorrow is another day."
How to format dialogue
Quotation Marks
See
Hear
Smell
Taste
Feel (physically)
Using a
YELLOW
highlighter, identify
TEN
sentences/phrases of
SETTING

DESCRIPTION
...
S.T.E.A.L. your
characters!
Use the five methods of indirect characterization to reveal the personality of your character(s) to the reader.
-
Speech
--Accent, word choice, and tone spoken by the character
"You want the truth? You can't handle the truth!" he said.
-
Effect on others
--How others are impacted by your character’s personality
-
Looks
--Physical appearance of character including expressions and fashion
-
Thoughts
--Goals, emotions, and other internal processes kept private from others by the character
-
Actions
--Movements and decisions made by your character
AND
OTHER NARRATIVE TECHNIQUES THAT MAKE YOU THE LIFE OF THE PARTY
What's your problem?
First, let's identify initial problems and situations...with the Big Bang Theory!
Next, let's write a few initial problems of our own. Using today's bellringer as a kick starter, list as many problems as you can think of. This list will serve as writing prompts in the near future.
Your goal:

While reading p. 1-6 of AHWOSG by Dave Eggers, use EACH of the five annotation marks we discussed last week. Good luck and enjoy your reading!
ANNOTATE IN YOUR JOURNALS
! # ? = +
What's the problem?
First, let's identify initial problems and situations...with the Big Bang Theory!
Next, let's write a few initial problems of our own. Using today's bellringer as a kick starter, list as many problems as you can think of. This list will serve as writing prompts in the near future.
Your goal:

While reading p. 1-6 of AHWOSG by Dave Eggers, use EACH of the five annotation marks we discussed last week. Good luck and enjoy your reading!
ANNOTATE IN YOUR JOURNALS
! # ? = +
by creating a problem or situation!
Analyzing Point-of-View
1ST
2ND
3RD
PERSON
PERSON
PERSON
...Narrator observes the events of the story without any insight to character's thoughts and feelings.

...Narrator has insight to ONE character's thoughts and feelings.

...Narrator has insight to ALL characters' thoughts and feelings.
Let's IDENTIFY P.O.V.
3RD
PERSON
PERSON
PERSON
3RD
3RD
objective
limited
OMNISCIENT
objective
limited
OMNISCIENT
What do you see?
What do you see?
Stories are similar to the illusions above in that the same EVENTS can be told in very different ways when the perspective changes.
Why does P.O.V. matter?
Let's give it a try!
Read
the passages from Divergent and Harrison Bergeron.
Circle
every pronoun that refers to the protagonist and
underline
any character thoughts or feelings expressed by the narrator.
Consider
your own short story. On the lines below,
write
2-3 from your story that demonstrate which P.O.V. the story is told from.
Why
did you choose to write the story from this P.O.V.?

How
might the story change if told from another P.O.V.?
Speech-Thoughts-Effects-Actions-Looks
S.T.E.A.L.
S.T.E.A.L. your
characters!
"You want the truth? You can't handle the truth!" he said.
Begin creating your own well-developed character using a S.T.E.A.L. Profile. Log in to Google Classroom, open the template, and click FILE>MAKE A COPY to edit.
The profile has six charts. Develop a realistic character by filling out each of the them.
-Background
-Speech
-Thoughts
-EFFECT
-actions
-looks
Narrative Pacing
Pacing
is the speed at which a story unfolds for a reader.
Summaries
tend to
speed up
the narrative while
scenes
tend to
slow down
narratives.

The recipe for a good story requires several important ingredients such as
setting

description
,
character

description
, and
dialogue
among others. These ingredients are often found in a single scene.
Your Second Goal
Make a Scene!
Using what we've learned about sensory language and characterization, write a one page scene featuring 2-3 characters.
Your scene should contain the following elements mixed together:
Your First Goal
Analyze a Scene!
Consider what we've learned about sensory language, characterization, and pacing. Then, analyze one page of your own book choice.
Go sentence by sentence and identify where each of the three elements below are used? How many sentences contain each of the above elements?
Description of setting (five senses)
Description of character
Action (something that happens)

Description of setting (use five senses)
Description of characters (use adjectives and STEAL)
Meaningful Dialogue

Reveal Character
Advance plot
Create suspense
What characters say to each other can show the reader a lot about their personality.
For example:
"Stop your whining, you weasel! I don't wanna hear another word. No sniveling coward is going to back out on me now!"
What character trait does this line of dialogue reveal about the character speaking?
A. Sympathetic
d. APATHETIC
c. TENACIOUS
b. NOBLE
What characters say to each other can also cause certain events to happen.
For example:
"That's right. Be there after closing. 10:00 pm. Make sure you ain't followed. We got to get in and out, 'cause security comes on at midnight."
Based on the information given, what event will happen?
A. robbery
c. work out
session
b. SHopping spree
d. world series
watch party
What characters say to each other can also raise the stakes or make the reader nervous.
For example:
"What do you mean the safe is empty?! Quiet! Someone's coming!"
This line of dialogue creates suspense because...
A. empty safe
c. robbers too
loud
b. security might
find the robbers
D. all of
the above
Dialogue Tag
"I don't think we're in Kansas anymore
,
"
said Dorothy.
"I don't think we're in Kansas anymore,"
said Dorothy
.
There are
four
rules to formatting dialogue:
Punctuation
"I don't think we're in Kansas anymore
,
" said Dorothy
.
Paragraph
"I don't think we're in Kansas anymore," said Dorothy.
"No," said the Munchkin King, "you're not."
YOUR TASK:
YOUR TASK:
Add Meaninful Dialogue to Your Story
--Grab a
chrome
, log in to
Google Classroom
, and open your
dystopian story
rough draft.

--Add at least
FIVE
lines of meaningful dialogue.
1.) Reveals
2.) Advances
3.) Creates

--Double check to make sure it is formatted correctly.
1.) Frame character's words with
2.) Add a every once in a while
3.) Use and in the right spots
4.) Make it a new when a new character speaks
cHARACTER
SUSPENSE
plot
COMMAS
PERIODS
paragraph
quotation marks
DIALOGUE TAG
Your Second Goal:
Convey a vivid picture
First
, describe a person and place (real or fictional). For the person, consider head shape, eyes, nose, mouth, etc. For the place, consider all five senses, but rely on sight for multiple details.

Next
, trade descriptions with another student and attempt to draw each other's descriptions.
Your third Goal:
Revise for improvement
First
, circle all the adjectives in your description and use the thesaurus and adjective list handout to find two better replacements for each adjective.
EXAMPLE:
Big nose and bushy eyebrows.

Next
, pick one of the adjective replacements and rewrite your description in paragraph format using either first, second, or third person point-of-view.
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