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Charles Dickens' Our Mutual Friend and Education of the Poor and Working Class

Literature 340
by

Nicholas Sabia

on 27 November 2012

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Transcript of Charles Dickens' Our Mutual Friend and Education of the Poor and Working Class

Charles Dickens' Our Mutual Friend and Education of the Poor and Working Class You know that it’s good to have it, or you would never have so devoted yourself to your brother’s having it. Then why not have it: especially when our friend Miss Jenny here would profit by it too? If I proposed to be the teacher, or to attend the lessons—obviously incongruous!—but as to that I might as well be on the other side of the globe, or not on the globe at all. False pride, Lizzie. Because true pride wouldn’t have schoolmasters brought here, like doctors, to look at a bad case. True pride would go to work and do it. You know that, well enough, for you know that your own true pride would do it to-morrow if you had the ways and means which false pride won’t let me supply. (Dickens 229) Works Cited By: Nicholas Sabia & Jilly Spytman “‘You see, Charley dear, I have made up my mind that this is the right time for your going away from us. Over and above all the blessed change of by-and-by, you’ll be much happier, and do much better, even so soon as next month. Even so soon as next week’” (Dickens 70). Dickens, Charles. Our Mutual Friend. New York: The Modern Library, 2002. Print.

Victorian Web. < http://www.victorianweb.org/ >. Web. 23 Nov. 2012. Quotes
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