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Grammar Prezzi

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carson greenwell

on 12 February 2015

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Transcript of Grammar Prezzi

By: Libby Hilpp, Trinity Berrow, and Carson Greenwell
Pronouns
Nouns:
Verbs:
Action Verb: Tells what the subject is doing.
-Sally
ran
across the room.
-Bob
hopped
around the trampoline.

Linking Verbs: Connects or links a subject to a noun or an adjective in a predicate.
-The book
is
in the library.
-Tornadoes
are
common in the south.

Helping Verbs: Helps the main verb express tense and voice.
-It
has been
decided that school is mandatory.
-The school bell
will
ring in a few minutes.





Adverbs:
Adjectives:
8 parts of speech
prepositions:
Conjunctions:
Interjections:
Common Nouns: A common noun is any noun that does not name a specific person, place, thing, or idea. These nouns are not capitalized.
-The
girl
went into school.
-Trevor tied his
shoes.



Proper Nouns: A proper noun is the name of a specific place, person, or thing. It is capitalized.
George Washington
liked ice-cream.
His practice was on
Tuesday.

Concrete Nouns: A concrete noun names a thing of a specific person, place, or thing. Concrete can either proper or common.
- The
pen
was blue ink.
- The
White House
is a very busy place.

Abstract Nouns: An abstract noun names something you can think about but cannot
see or touch. Abstract nouns can be concrete or proper.
- Being
Christian
is fun.
- Having a
sickness
is gross.

Collective Nouns: A collective noun names a group or collection of person's, animals, places, or things.
- A
school
of fish swam by.
-A
class
of people walked by.

Compound Nouns: A compound name is made of two or more words.
- My
mother-in-law
is very nice.
-The
high school
is close to the middle school.






Types of Pronouns:
Antecedents: Is the noun that the pronoun refers to or replaces. all pronouns (except interrogative and indefinite
pronouns) have anecdotes
-
They
had fun at the fair.
-
It
was a very warm day.

Personal Pronouns: A personal takes takes the place of a specific person or thing in a sentence some common personal pronouns are I ,you,he,she,it,we and they.
-
She
ran very slow.
-
I
was team captain.

Relative Pronouns: A relative pronoun is both a pronoun and a connecting word.
-The school
that
has the most people is Tumwater High school
- She is the person
who
is very nice.

Interrogative Pronoun: An interrogative pronoun helps ask a question.
-
Who
is the person that stole her purse?
-
What
questions were the homework?

Demonstrative Pronouns: Points out or identifys a noun without naming the noun.
-
This
is a fun project.
-
Those
socks are cool.

Intensive Pronouns: Emphasizes or intensifys , the noun or pronoun it refers to.
-He caught
himself
from falling.
-I thought
myself
, it was a very nice presentation.

Reflexive Pronouns: Refers back to the subject of the sentence, and its always an object, never a subject in a sentence.
-I feed
myself
very healthy foods.
-He protects
himself
by hiding in blankets.

Indefinite Pronouns: A pronoun that does not have a specific antecedent.
-Everything
about the poster looked spectacular.
-
Anyone
who acts like her is a doll.




Tenses of Verbs:
Present Tense Verbs: The present tense of a verb expresses action or a state of being or continuously or regularly.
-He
is
taking a run
-She
is
making a sandwich.
Past Tense Verbs: The past tense of a verb expresses action or a state of being that was completed in the past.
-The man ran three miles yesterday.
-The woman drove to the store on Tuesday.

Future Tense Verbs: The future tense of a verb expresses action that will take place.
-Someday I will go to China.
-I will take the garbage later.

Present continuous tense verb: Expresses action that is completed at the time of starting it.
-Many people are skating in the park.
-Mel is making a sandwich.




Articles: The articles a, an, and the are adjectives
-
The
boy is a good student.
-
The
girl is good at the art of drawing.
Proper Adjectives: A proper adjective is formed from a proper noun and it is always capitalized.
-The
Chicago
sandwich shop is delicious.
-The
Olympian
pizza place is delicious.

Common Adjectives: A common adjective is a adjective that is not proper or capitalized.
-My grandpa says he is very
ancient
.
-I want to live on a
grassy
field when I'm older.

Demonstrative Adjectives: Points out a particular noun in a sentence.
- This worm is
big.
-But that sandwich is
bigger.

Compound Adjectives: A compound adjective is made up of two or more words.
- The girl is a
kind
person.
-The boy is a
big-kid
baller.
Adverbs of Time: An adverb of time tells when,how often and how long.
-
Tomorrow
I will eat a roast beef sandwich.
-I
never
eat a bad sandwich.

Adverbs of Place: Tell where to where to or from where.
-The man was going to climb
on
the mountain.
-The man placed his tent
under
a tree.

Adverbs of Manner: Adverbs often end in ly and tell how something is done. Some words as adverbs can be written with or without the ly ending.
-George
boldly
walked into the doughnut store.
-Libby
quietly
stalked the cat.

Adverbs of Degree: Adverbs of degree tell how much or how little.
-Mike is
usually
the maker of doughnuts.
-Trinity is
often
the basketball manager.

Conjunctive Adverbs: Can be used as a conjunction and shows connection or a transition between two independent clauses.
-While she sang, she also tapped her foot.
-He didn't liker here, therefore they broke up.

Forms of Adverbs:

Positive Adverbs: Describes but does not make a comparison.
-He
slowly
jogged down the driveway.
-She woke up very
late.


Comparative Adverbs: Form of adverb and compares two things.
-She woke up much
earlier
than her brother.
-He ran much
quicker
than Mary.

Superlative Adverbs: Adverb compares three or more things.
-She was the
last
one to arrive at the finish line.
-He slept in the
latest
on Mondays.

Irregular Forms: Some adverbs use completely different words to express comparison.
-She was doing very
badly
on the test.
-He was in
better
shape every passing day.




Prepositional Phrases: A preposition is never alone, it is always part of a prepositional phrase. A prepositional phrase includes the preposition, the object of the preposition, and the modifiers of the object.
-My cousin looked around the closet for her lost earing.
(Preposition: around, object: closet, modifiers: the, closet.)
-She had never won a volleyball match before.
(Before is an adverb that modifies had won)

Coordinating Conjunctions: Connects a word to a word, a phrase to a phrase, or a clause to a clause. The words, phrases, or clauses, joined by a coordinating conjunction must be equal, or of the same type.
-Littered beaches
and
docks can easily be picked up.
-You can drive a car
or
take the bus to get to the beach in the same amount of time.

Correlative Conjunctions: Conjunctions used in pairs.
-We must
not only
finish this project
but also
do the algebra homework.
-
Either
eat the ice cream,
or
you can eat the brownie.

Subordinating Conjunctions: Word or group of words that connects two clauses that are not equally important. A subordinating conjunction begins a dependent clause and connects it to and independent clause to make a complex sentence.
-I think she is funny
because
she makes a lot of jokes.
-
Since
she never eats breakfast, she never has enough energy to get through the day.

An interjection is a word or phrase used to express strong emotion or surprise. Punctuation is used to separate an interjection from the rest of the sentence.
-
Wow
, that dress looks gorgeous.
-
Oh no
! She broke her arm.
Eight parts of speech
Number of Nouns:

Singular Nouns: Names one person, place, thing, or idea.
-The
boy
was mean.
-The
girl
liked lollipops.

Plural Nouns: A plural noun names more than on person, place, thing or idea.
-The
girls
laughed together.
-The
groups
battled each other.

Gender of Nouns:
Noun Gender: Nouns are grouped according to gender.
-My
mother
liked cupcakes (feminine)
-My
brother
was funny. (masculine)

Uses of Nouns:
Subject Noun: A noun that is the subject of the sentence does something or is talked about in a sentence.
-The
roots
of my family are swedish.
- The
walruses
have been found in Antarctica.

Predicate Nouns: Follows a form of the be verb and renames the subject.
-Bluegrass music is southern
heritage.

-The angel was a brilliant
light
in the play.

Possessive Nouns: Shoes possession or ownership.
-The
swimmers
new suit was ugly.
-The
singers
new song was very catchy.

Object Nouns: When it is used as the direct object, the indirect object, or the object of the preposition.
-Techno music is not very popular in the
country.

-Some
people
are very good listeners.



Nouns Continued:
Pronouns Continued:
Number of a Pronoun:
Singular and Plural Pronouns: Pronouns can be either singular or plural.
-
I
rode my bike to the store. (singular)
-
They
threw a big party.

Person of a Pronoun:
First Persons Pronoun: Is used in place of the speaker or speakers.
-
I
read very loudly.
-
We
are a very quiet group.

Second Person Pronouns: Is used to name the person or thing spoken to.
-Thank
you
for buying my pizza.
-
You
are so pretty.

Third Person Pronouns: Used to name the person or thing spoken about.
-I know
she
is very clever.
-You see
they
don't like me.

Uses of a Pronoun:

Subject Pronouns: Is used as the subject of the sentence.
-"This is
her
right here" I told him.
-"Yes,
I
swear I didn't do it." She yelled.

Object Pronouns: Can be used as the object of a verb or preposition.
-I'll talk to
her
as soon as I can.
-Can you send
me
a picture of the waterfall?

Possessive Pronouns: Shows possession or ownership. These possessive pronouns function as adjectives before nouns.
-I think
our
new house is very clean.
-I think
it's
over in the corner.
Adjectives Continued:
Special Kinds of Adjectives:
Indefinite Adjectives: Gives approximate, or indefinite, information. It does not tell exactly how many or how much.
-I only eat
some
meats.
-My father eats
a lot
of vegetables.

Predicate Adjectives: Follows a linking verb and describes the subject.
-The fish in the pond are quite
abundant.

-All the crawfish in the pond went
extinct
.

Forms of Adjectives:
Positive Adjectives: Describes a noun or pronoun without comparing it to anyone or anything else.
-He is a very
fast
runner.
-I thought the new car was very
grand.


Comparative Adjectives: Compares two persons, places, things, or ideas.
-The new train in Germany is much
nicer
than our US Metro System.
-The flashlight was
brighter
than her old one.

Superlative Adjectives: Compares three or more persons, places, things, or ideas.
-She was the
slowest
girl in school.
-He was the
smartest
kid in our class.

Irregular Forms: Some adjectives use completely different words to express comparison.
- She was a
better
soccer player than her mom. (good, better, best)
-Her brother was the
worst
kid on the playground. (bad, worse, worst)
Verbs Continued:
Present Perfect Tense Verbs: Expresses action that began in the past but continues or is completed in the present.
-I
have wondered
what I will be doing in school tomorrow.
-She continues to
have pain
in her ankle.

Past Perfect Tense Verbs: Expresses action that began in the past and is completed in the past.
-I
had hoped
to see the Mickey Mouse movie in Disney World.
-He
had prayed
to get an A on the project.

Future Perfect Tense Verbs: Expresses action that will begin in the future and will be completed by a specific time in the future.
-I
will have seen
the new movie by then.
-She
will have flown
in the airplane by now.

Present Continuous Tense Verbs: Expresses action that is not completed at the time of starting it.
-I
am contributing
a lot to this project,
-She
is continuing
to be a great athlete.

Past Continuous Tense Verbs: Expresses action that was happening at a certain time in the past.
-She
was starting
to become a better cook.
-They
were starting
to learn much more about the eight parts of speech.

Future Continuous Tense Verbs: Expresses action that will take place at a certain time in the future.
-Someday I
will become
Prom Queen.
-They
are going to be performing
a miracle if they can save his arm.

Forms Of Verbs:
Active or Passive Voice: The voice of the verb tells you whether the subject is not doing the action or receiving the action. The verb is the active voice if the subject is doing the action in the sentence.
-I
dream
of being a cat.
-I
will ride
to the fair with my friend.

Singular and Plural Verbs: A singular subject needs a singular verb. A plural subject needs a plural verb. For action verbs, on the third-person singular verb form is different.
-
I am
a good soccer player. (singular)
-
We are
good soccer players. (plural)

Transitive Verbs: Verb that transfers its action to a direct object. The object makes the meaning of the verb complete.
-I
swayed
the swing back and forth.
-I
ruined
her shoes.

Intransitive Verbs: Does not need and object to complete its meaning.
-Susan
was skiing.

-He
soaked
up the sun.

Transitive or Intransitive Verbs: Some verbs can be either transitive or intransitive.
-She
reads
her book. (transitive)
-He
reads
slowly. (intransitive)

Gerunds: Verb form that ends in ing and is used as a noun. Usually begins a phrase.
-
Stressing
has no point.
-I should
stop stressing about so many things.


Participles: Verb form ending in ing or ed. A participle is used as an adjective and often begins with a prepositional phrase.
-The
running
water was cold.
-The
baked
chicken was good,

Infinitives: Verb form introduced by to. It may be used as a noun, adjective, adverb.
-You need
to listen
carefully in his class.
-I have
to swim
in the next meet.
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