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Subjunctive Mood

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by

Olivia Hong

on 10 June 2014

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Transcript of Subjunctive Mood

The form a verb takes to show how it is to be regarded (ex: as a fact, a command, a wish, an uncertainty)


Mood
When to Use Subjunctive Mood
Subjunctive mood

used for hypothetical or imaginary situations that are

non-factual

Indicative mood
used for
statements of fact
(what is happening, what has happened, what will happen)
Verb Changes
What is Subjunctive Mood?
Verb form used to express conditional or imaginary situations such as
:


By Olivia Hong
Jessica Zhao
Jonathan Gao

Subjunctive Mood
Subjunctive vs Indicative:
Wishes


Suggestions



Commands





Hypothetical Statements




Condition that is contrary to fact




I suggest that you not kill your father and marry your mother.
I wish I were king of Thebes.
Petruchio demanded Kate be his wife.
If a butcher were to back up into his meat grinder, he might get a little behind in his work.
If I were President, I would promote peace.
If I were taller, I would be able to dunk a basketball.
Examples
Indicative:

I
think
that the sky
is
blue.
Subjunctive:

I
wish
that the sky
were
chartreuse.

NOT:

I
think
that the sky
be
blue.
I
wish
that the sky
was
chartreuse.

Indicative:

When Natasha was
a butterfly in a former life, she had wings.
Subjunctive:

If Natasha were
a butterfly, she would have wings.

NOT:
When Natasha were
a butterfly in a former life, she had wings.

If Natasha was
a butterfly, she would have wings.
Were (past tense)
Kate
was
going to get married.

If Kate
were
married, she would still act defiant.

Be (present tense)
The teacher always forgets that a viola
is
not a violin.

It is essential that he
be
aware of the difference.
Any other verbs (past or present)
Samuel

ate

during class everyday last week.

I prefer that Samuel
eat

only when he has enough to share.

Common Uses
to emphasize the tentative or unreal nature of a wish, hope, command, or suggestion
Appears in restrictive clauses after phrases like:
Phrases or clauses including
"might"

and
"may"

You sneezed!
God bless you
.

Heaven forbid!
Idiomatic Expressions
Statement of necessity
to emphasize
urgency
or
importance
It is essential
that you give me your wallet.
It is imperative
that you not give your wallet to strangers.
It is best
It is crucial
It is desirable
It is essential
It is imperative

It is important (that)
It is recommended
It is urgent
It is a good idea
It is a bad idea
I wish (that)
I hope that
I advise that
I ask that
I demand that
I insist that
I desire that
I suggest that
I propose that
I recommend that
I request that
Subjunctive:
A car might crash into his house if he were to build it on the highway.
Using "if...were" to describe a hypothetical situation
For all verbs except the past tense of be, the subjunctive is the same as the bare infinitive (infinitive without "to")
Note that it doesn't change depending on the subject

If I were a rich man...
Sources
I request that our whiteboards be remarkable.
Fogarty, Mignon. "Subjunctive Verbs." Quickanddirtytips.com/education. QDT, n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

"Mood for Grammar." Talkenglish.com. TalkEnglish, n.d. Web. 01 May 2014. <http://www.talkenglish.com/Grammar/mood.aspx>.

Shrives, Craig. "What Is the Subjunctive Mood." Grammar-monster.com. Grammar Monster, n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

"Subjunctive." EnglishClub.com. English Club, n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

"Subjunctive Mood." Grammarist.com. Grammarist, n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

Wheeler, Kip. "The Subjunctive Mood." The Subjunctive Mood. Carson Newman University, n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

Warriner, John E. The Holt Handbook: Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, Sentences. Vol. 4. Austin, TX: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 2003. Print.

Woodham, Roger. "Learning English." BBC News. BBC, n.d. Web. 30 Apr. 2014.

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