Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Three Sisters

by Anton Chekhov
by

Cortney McEniry

on 3 March 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Three Sisters

Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov designed by Cortney McEniry Longing for life.

Call to work.

Tragic quality against
laughable comedy.

Happiness as future destiny.

Work. Loneliness.

(Stanislavski) The Brontë Sisters Charlotte “... two gentlemen come in, leading a tiny, delicate, serious, little lady, with fair straight hair, and steady eyes. She may be a little over thirty; she is dressed in a little barège dress with a pattern of faint green moss." Anne Isabella Thackeray Ritchie. Chapters from Some Memoirs. cited in Sutherland, James (ed.) The Oxford Book of Literary Ancedotes. OUP, 1975. ISBN 0198121393. (Masha) Jane Eyre Anne "Anne, dear gentle Anne was quite different in appearance from the others, and she was her aunt's favourite. Her hair was a very pretty light brown, and fell on her neck in graceful curls. She had lovely violet-blue eyes; fine pencilled eyebrows and a clear almost transparent complexion." Fraser, A Life of Anne Brontë, p. 39 Agnes Grey Emily "Emily Brontë had by this time acquired a lithesome, graceful figure. She was the tallest person in the house, except her father. Her hair, which was naturally as beautiful as Charlotte's, was in the same unbecoming tight curl and frizz, and there was the same want of complexion. She had very beautiful eyes – kind, kindling, liquid eyes; but she did not often look at you; she was too reserved. Their colour might be said to be dark grey, at other times dark blue, they varied so. " (Olga) (Irina) -Ellen Nussey Reminiscences of Charlotte Brontë Catherine Earnshaw Other Members of the House (Fyodor Ilyich Kulygin) Arthur Bell Nichols Lydia Robinson (Natasha) Branwell Bronte (Andrey) Concept Statement: Constantin Heger Aleksandr Ignatyevich Vershinin Mikhail Lermontov (Vassily Vasilyevich Solyony) Given Circumstances Costume Plot & Lists ACT
ONE:
Olga
Masha
Irina
Chebutykin
Tuzenbakh
Solyony
Anfisa
Ferapont
Vershinin
Andrew
Kulygin
Natasha
Fedotik
Rode ACT
TWO:
Natasha
Andrew
Ferapont
Masha
Vershinin
Tuzenbakh
Irina
Fedotik
Rode
Solyony
Anfisa
Maid ACT THREE:
Olga
Irina
Masha
Anfisa
Ferapont
Natasha
Kulygin
Chebutykin
Vershinin
Tuzenbach
Fedotik
Solyony
Andrew ACT
FOUR:
Chebutykin
Irina
Kulygin
Tuzenbakh
Fedotik
Rode
Andrew
Masha
Ferapont
Solyony
Vershinin
Olga
Anfisa
Natasha When Stanislavski produced Three Sisters at the Moscow Art Theatre, he said that one of the main themes of the play was a “longing for life.” In the costuming of this production for Furman University, I wanted to demonstrate this theme through a symbolic use of color. Each of the sisters has a color that represents her personality and her desires, and this color fades or brightens depending on the circumstances of each act. Because the play is said to have been inspired by the life of the Bronte sisters, I have based the appearances of the characters on portraits of the sisters, as well as portrayals of the leading ladies they created. The real-life parallels in the Bronte’s life also inspired the concepts for the other characters. The play is set in the Romantic period because the Bronte sisters were living in this time and actively involved in the movement. Essentially, the central goal of this design is to express a liveliness striving to emerge, but unable to do so. Olga Irena Irena is possibly the most sympathetic character in the play. When the play begins, it is her name day, and she is only twenty years old. She expresses a newfound hope to find happiness. She feels like her life won’t begin until she goes back to Moscow, but when she realizes this won’t happen, she deals with it and moves on. While her life is devoid of romance, she finds ways to make herself happy enough to continue living and to move on. She is not in love with her husband, but it is not difficult to tolerate him. Her constant insistence that she has grown up is completely ignored by those around her. While Irena can never be seen as an adult, Olga can never be seen as a young woman. Though she is only twenty-eight years old when the play begins, she is the matriarch of the family, and her speech and mannerisms are those of an elderly woman. She does not enjoy her job as a teacher, and yet continues to teach and eventually takes the headmistress job simply because she has nothing better to do. Her acceptance of the headmistress job signifies her acceptance that the family will not be moving back to Moscow, and she deals with this by ignoring it. Especially towards the end of the play, Olga simply gives up trying to deal with the things going on around her. Masha (wealthy, intellectual society) (wealthy, intellectual society) (wealthy, intellectual society) (wealthy, intellectual society) Andrey Masha is perhaps the most tragic of the characters, but she is also the least sympathetic to the audience. Her easily triggered temper is often unleashed on her sisters or on others around her, and her affair with Vershinin is odd, unexpected, and barely explained. She is 25 at the beginning of the play. Andrey attempts to shoulder the expectations of his sister and fails; this is felt by everyone around him and especially Andrey himself. He is also disappointed in himself; he does not reach his dream of becoming a professor despite his talents and abilities that would make it completely possible. His marriage is awful, and he eventually retires from life, escaping from his failures through his books. He is twenty seven when the play begins. Natasha (noble enough for Andrey, but not as intellectual as the sisters) She takes advantage of the sister’s passive feelings towards her, interpreting them as a permissive kindness, and thus takes charge of a household not her own. When Natasha becomes a mother, a power-trip ensues, to the point where Andrey says she is not human. She is also involved in an affair with Andrey’s supervisor; another way for her to assert her power is for her to show that she can have someone with so much authority. She has no respect for servants and in the end is manipulative and selfish, with no redeeming qualities. Kulygin Middle class, well educated Kulygin can best be described as ridiculous. His admiration for his headmaster is over-the-top, and his immediate acceptance of Masha’s affair is incredible. He is almost the comedic relief, because his actions are so idiotic, it is difficult to take him seriously. Vershinin (high-ranking officer in the army) Vershinin is full of charisma and poetry, a perfect temptation for the stifled Masha. His suicidal wife and love for his two daughters are further cause for sympathy. He loves to wax eloquently, and he has some of the more beautiful lines in the play. He is forty-two, but doesn’t look that old. His presence is very important to the play, as the play begins when he arrives and ends when he leaves. Tuzenbach (A Lieutenant in the Army) Tuzenbach is in his thirties. He is hopelessly in love with Irina and all of his actions and words are motivated by her. He is important because Irina's decision to marry him is her attempt to go to Moscow, but ends up having the opposite affect. Solyony (a captain in the army) Solyony is a brooding soldier whose love for Irina causes him to kill her husband. He is constantly striving to impress Irina by putting down the Baron, but his little jibes give off an air of immaturity and pride. He is in his late thirties. Chebutykin (an army doctor) Chebutykin is like an uncle or another father figure to the girls. He was in love with their mother, and admits this willingly to them. He is sixty years old. He loves to lavish expensive gifts on the sisters, especially Irena. Fedotik (a sub-lieutenant) Fedotik is extremely cheerful and optimistic. His character is interesting because he is always documenting the sister's lives in photographs, which represent events realistically, but he cannot seem to get an understanding of the reality of their misery. He is in his mid-twenties. Rode (a sub-lieutenant) Robe is, essentially, Fedotik's sidekick. He also works at the same school as Kulygin and has some of the same ridiculous tendencies. He is in his mid-twenties. Anfisa (the family nurse) Anfisa is a second mother to the sisters. She is a very important figure because she is so sympathetic to the audience. Everytime a character snaps at Anfisa, it causes the audience to take notice and consider the reasons behind it. She is eighty-two years old, which is a large part of the audience's empathy for her. Ferapont (Door-keeper at local council offices) Ferapont is an elderly, hard-of-hearing communicator between the city council and Andrey. He is a device used by Checkhov to constantly bring up Moscow, as he is always spouting off facts about Moscow. He is also used in much the same way Anfisa is because he is highly sympathetic to the audience. ACT THREE
Masha is lying on a sofa wearing a black dress as usual.

Anfisa: I’m over eighty. Eighty-one I am…

Natasha: We should always be ready to help the poor. It’s up to the rich, isn’t it?

Natasha: People say I’ve put on weight. But it’s not true, not a bit of it.

Tuzenbakh is wearing a new and fashionable suit.

Vershinin: I got terribly dirty at the fire, must look like nothing on earth. ACT FOUR
Chebutykin has his army cap on and holds a stick.

Kulygin wears a decoration on a ribbon round his neck and has shaved off his moustache.

Fedotik and Rode are in service dress.

Chebutykin: I’ve got an old-fashioned watch, a repeater.

Masha: As if this climate wasn’t quite enough, with snow liable to fall any minute…

Natasha: (to Irina) That sash doesn’t suit you at all, dear, in fact it’s in very poor taste. You need something nice and bright. Act I:
Olga, wearing the regulation dark blue dress of a high-school teacher…Masha, in a black dress, sits with her hat on her lap…Irina, in a white dress…

Olga (to Irina): You’re wearing white again and you look radiant.

Olga (to Irina): You're all radiance to-day, I've never seen you look so lovely. And Masha is pretty, too. Andrey wouldn't be bad-looking, if he wasn't so stout; it does spoil his appearance. But I've grown old and very thin… To-day I'm free. I'm at home. I haven't got a headache, and I feel younger than I was yesterday. I'm only twenty-eight....

Tuzenbakh (about Vershinin): Forty or forty-five [years old] at the most.

Irina: You’re so used to seeing me as a little girl… I am twenty, you know.Tuzenbakh: I’ve never done a hand’s turn all my life.

Chebutykin: I’ve never done a thing and that’s a fact.

Anfisa (about Vershinin): He’s taken his coat off

Olga (to Vershinin): You haven’t a single grey hair. You may look older, but no one could call you old.

Vershinin: I’m nearly forty-three all the same.

Masha (about Natasha): Oh, dear the way she dresses. It’s not merely ugly and unfashionable, it’s downright pathetic. She wears a weird skirt in a kind of bright yellow with such a vulgar fringe, my dear, and a red blouse. And her cheeks always look as if they’ve been scrubbed and scrubbed.

Enter Kulygin wearing a teacher’s uniform.

Kulygin… looks at his watch.

Tuzenbakh: I’m not yet thirty…

Natasha comes in wearing a pink dress with a green sash.

Olga (about Natasha’s sash): … it just doesn’t go with your dress, it looks odd somehow.
Natasha: Does it? But it isn’t really green, you know, it’s more a sort of dull colour.

Rode: I teach gymnastics at the high shool here. ACT TWO
Natasha comes in wearing a dressing gown…

Ferapont comes in wearing a shabby old overcoat with the collar up and a scarf round his ears.

Irina comes back from work at the post office.

Olga comes in from work at the school.

Kulygin comes in from work at the school.

Masha (about Irina): You’ve got thin. You seem younger too and you’ve begun to look like a little boy.
Tuzenbakh: It’s the way you do your hair.

Chebutykin, who has just got out of bed after an afternoon nap…

Vershinin: My hair’s going grey now and I’m growing old…
Tuzenbakh: I’m not handsome…

Andrew, wearing an overcoat and hat…

Natasha crosses the ballroom wearing a fur coat and a fur hat. Color Justifications: Irena: Pink to signify innocence and vitality
Olga: Yellow to signify joy but also cowardice
Masha: red to signify anger and lust
Solyony: Pink to identify with Irena
Anfisa: Blue to represent exhaustion and sorrow, grey for age
Vershinin: Red to represent lust and tie with Masha
Chebutykin: Yellow to represent joy but also cuckhold
Andrey: Blue to represent sorrow
Natasha: Green to represent greed, hot pink to represent a hot temper and immaturity Budget Statement Approximately $7,000.This is a large budget production. As much as possible should be built, with an emphasis on authentic tailoring so that actors hold themselves correctly.Shoes, hats, etc. can be pulled.Priority should be put on the sister’s dresses and Natasha’s dresses.Each character: $500 OLGA:•Dress for each act.•Same shoes throughout.•No hat.MASHA:•Dress for each act.•Same shoes throughout.•No hat.IRENA:•Dress for each act.•Same shoes throughout.•No hat.ANDREY:•Two different pairs of pants, two jackets, each used alternately.•Different vest for each act (progressively getting duller and greyer.)•Same shoes throughout.•Hat.•Walking cane.NATASHA:•Dress each for Acts I, III, IV.•Dressing gown for Act IV.•Fur coat and muff for Act IV.•Same shoes throughout.•No hat.KULYGIN:•Two different pairs of pants, two jackets, each used alternately.•Different cravat for each act (progressively getting duller and greyer.)•Same shoes throughout.•Hat. Bibliography Allen, David. Performing Chekhov. Routledge. New York. 2000.
Bentley, Phyllis. The Brontes and Their World. Viking Press. New York, NY. 1969.
Sugden, K.A.R. A Short History of the Brontes. Oxford University Press. London: Humphrey Milford. 1929.
"Three Sisters", The Sunday Times, 31 January 2010

Images in collages obtained from Wikipedia Commons Database.
Images for renderings obtained from:Deborah Brunson, “Costume History- Restoration.” 20 February 2009. Online Powerpoint. http://theatre.nmsu.edu/thtr307/INDEX.htm. 16 April 2010.
Full transcript