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Medieval Pollution Comparing

A prezi comparing medieval pollution and pollution in the present.
by

Dashelle Shenhova

on 22 November 2015

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Transcript of Medieval Pollution Comparing

Information Store!
Comparing
Water Pollution
Garbage Pollution
Early reuse and recycling existed in the form of salvage. Traditionally, recovered materials have included leather, feathers and down, and textiles. Early recycling included feeding vegetable wastes to livestock and using green waste as fertilizer. Pigs were often used as an efficient method of disposing of municipal waste. Timber was salvaged and reused in construction and ship-building. Materials such as gold have always been melted down and re-cast numerous times. Later, recovery activities included scrap metal, paper and non-ferrous metals.
Information Store!
People didn't understand garbage was a threat until urban populations boomed. As cities began to develop, people burned their personal trash, buried it, or let it pile up. As waste piled up in urban settings, the resulting filth caused stench, harbored rats and other pests, led to contaminated water supplies and perpetuated human disease. Some of the greatest plagues to ever impact humanity resulted from these conditions. Some of the earliest organized waste management techniques developed during this period as a way to stop and prevent further disease.
In 1995, the Government passed its Environment Act, requiring the publication of a National Air Quality Strategy to set standards for the regulation of the most common air pollutants. Published in 1997, the National Air Quality Strategy has set commitments for local authorities to achieve new air quality objectives throughout the UK by 2005. It is reviewed periodically.
This on the other hand creates another problem: environmental pollution. Peoples in cities are washing clothes, dishes, and go to the toilet. The waste produced in this way is flushed into water courses polluting it and making it unsuitable for human consumption or organisms to live in. Preparing food also creates waste, which ends often in landfills or is incinerated. Cars, fires to heat our homes and stoves to cook on pollute the air because of the use of wood, coal or gas, causing smog. The worst smog in Britain was the famous London smog of December 1952 in which about 3000 people died. However, the pollution mentioned above is mainly caused by domestic activities and transport. Industrial pollution is probably an even more serious problem leading to potentially poisoning the air, water and soil.
Cities can be regarded as artificial environments created for the benefit of humans, and yet none of this liberates people from nature. Cities have to be fed and provided with energy and water in order to exist and sustain its human population. The bigger the city, the more resources and energy must be extracted from the surrounding areas to sustain it.
Recycling Company!
During the latter half of this period civilization made many great strides, often to the detriment of the environment. People even ingested chemicals they thought were good for them at the time that we now know are very bad for you, like Radium and Lead. The Industrial Revolution of the 1800s saw little care for environmental impact for the benefit of industry.
Streams and wells became polluteds. Towns made laws about where certain types os businesses could be located . Some sources osf smell, pollution, and diseasee were leather tanners, dyers, and slaughter-houses. Wter pollution is a problem that towns continue to face today.
During the first part of the 20th century, tighter industrial controls lead to a reduction in smog pollution in urban areas. The 1926 Smoke Abatement Act was aimed at reducing smoke emissions from industrial sources, but despite the declining importance of coal as a domestic fuel, pollution from domestic sources remained significant.

Revolution during the 18th and 19th centuries was based on the use of coal. Industries were often located in towns and cities, and together with the burning of coal in homes for domestic heat, urban air pollution levels often reached very high levels. During foggy conditions, pollution levels escalated and urban smogs (smoke and fog) were formed. These often brought cities to a halt, disrupting traffic but more dangerously causing death rates to dramatically rise. The effects of this pollution on buildings and vegetation also became obvious. The 1875 Public Health Act contained a smoke abatement section to try and reduce smoke pollution in urban areas.
During this period most societies had very little idea of what was bad for you and what was detrimental to the environment. Mercury was commonly dumped into the water supply and most human and farm waste was allowed to run freely into lakes and streams.
Stop Pollution S.S.
Medieval pollution was worse than today's. They didn't have machines to clean the water for them to drink and to take baths. There was air pollution because of coal and smog. We still have pollution today for the same reasons. Sometimes we dump chemicals in the water and there is smog to pollute the air. We have garbage cans, but we dump garbage in garbage dumps. In the medieval times, there were no
garbage trucks. So they threw trash on the streets. They didn't
have medicine to cure diseases. That is why medieval
pollution is much worse than today's.

The Comparing Channel! :)
Medieval Pollution!
Air Pollution
Don't pollute the air!
Recycling Company!
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Air pollution, particularly in cities, is certainly not a new problem. Back in the medieval times, the use of coal in cities such as London was beginning to escalate. The problems of poor urban air quality even as early as the end of the 16th century are well documented.

Londoners have a long history of concern about the environmental hazards that accompany urban life. In medieval London, pollution from coal burning was seen as such a serious matter that a commission was established in 1285 to investigate the problem. It was reconvened three years later with firm instructions to find a solution. In 1307, during the reign of Edward I, legislation was introduced to prevent the use of sea coal in kilns and by blacksmiths.

This is burning coal.
This is sea coal.
That was smog.
The Great London Smog of 1952, which resulted in around 4,000 extra deaths in the city, led to the introduction of the Clean Air Acts of 1956 and 1968. These introduced smokeless zones in urban areas, with a tall chimney policy to help disperse industrial air pollutants away from built up areas into the atmosphere.

Following the Clean Air Acts, air quality improvements continued throughout the 1970s. Further regulations were introduced through the 1974 Control of Air Pollution Act. This included regulations for the composition of motor fuel and limits for the sulphur content of industrial fuel oil.

However, during the 1980s the number of motor vehicles in urban areas steadily increased and air quality problems associated with motor vehicles became more prevalent. In the early 1980s, the main interest was the effects of lead pollution on human health, but by the late 1980s and early 1990s, the effects of other motor vehicle pollutants became a major concern. The 1990s have seen the occurrence of wintertime and summertime smogs. These are not caused by smoke and sulphur dioxide pollution but by chemical reactions occurring between motor vehicle pollutants and sunlight. These are known as hotochemical smogs.



Many chemicals were pumped into the air and rivers. Most people of the day were not concerned with the impact that their inventions had on the environment. In their defense you could say that nobody had ever given much thought to the fact that the human race could even effect the ecology.

In the UK the Industrial Revolution during the 18th and 19th centuries was based on the use of coal. Industries were often located in towns and cities, and together with the burning of coal in homes for domestic heat, urban air pollution levels often reached very high levels. During foggy conditions, pollution levels escalated and urban smogs (smoke and fog) were formed. These often brought cities to a halt, disrupting traffic but more dangerously causing death rates to dramatically rise. The effects of this pollution on buildings and vegetation also became obvious. The 1875 Public Health Act contained a smoke abatement section to try and reduce smoke pollution in urban areas.
With the growth of cities and industrialisation urban waste and pollution are an important part of history. From the rise of the first urban settlements until the emergence of mega cities in the 20th century, the scale and intensity of pollution has increased. The bibliography below presents an introductory reading list on the topic of urban waste and pollution history.

Medieval people did not understand the importance of good sanitation for preventing diseases. Disposing of human and animal wastes and garbage was a constant problem for towns. Most people who lived in cities just dumped their waste and garbage into the street. It probably smelled very bad.
Burning Garbage
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That was motor vehicle pollutants
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