Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Seven Layer Density Column

Seven liquids with varying densities put into the same container to show how different densities will keep them seperate
by

Caroline Vanderhoof

on 12 January 2013

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Seven Layer Density Column

Source 1: Spangler, Steve. “Seven Layer Density Column”. Steve Spangler Science. n.p., n.d. web. 30 Dec 2012
Source 2: Matthew Williams. “Density Experiments.” eHow. Demand Media, n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013
Source 3: “What is the formula for density?” wikianswers. Answers Corporation, n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013
Source 4: “Densities of Common Liquids.” Avlan Design, n.p. n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013
Source 5: “Oil Spills in Rivers.” Office of Response and Restoration/ NOAA’s Ocean Service. n.p. n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013 Bibliography The results of the experiment did support the hypothesis that liquids of greater density could support liquids of lesser density. When I poured my liquids into the cylinder in order from greatest to least density they formed and stayed in separate layers which supported each other. The research I had read had led me to expect these results. The reason for the layers staying separate was that the liquids of greater density are heavier and the molecules are more tightly packed than the liquids with lesser density.
I improved this experiment by using less of the liquids than the experiment instructions asked for. This made it fit better into the graduated cylinder I had. Conclusions It worked! Taking the mass of each 100mL cup of liquid and calculating its density showed that each liquid had a different density. Pouring the liquids into the cylinder from most dense to least showed that the more dense liquids could hold up the less dense ones. At the end my graduated cylinder had seven separate layers of liquids which did not mix. Experiment Results Steps:
Set scale to zero with an empty portion cup on it.
Measure 100mL of each liquid and pour into portion cup labeled for each liquid.
Weigh each cup of liquid and write down its mass in grams.
Calculate the density of each liquid using the formula: Density= mass/volume
Pour the liquids into the graduated cylinder through the funnel one at a time in order of density from greatest to least.
Pour slowly and carefully. If your graduated cylinder is not big enough to fit 100mL, you may use a smaller amount of each liquid (I used 40mL) as long as you make sure to use the same amount of each liquid. Procedure For the Seven Layer Density Column experiment, the following materials were needed:
Funnel
Graduated cylinder
Seven 9oz portion cups labeled with names of liquids
A scale measuring grams
Measuring cup
Four ounces each of the following liquids:
Honey
Light corn syrup
Blue dish soap
Water
Vegetable oil
Rubbing alcohol
Lamp oil Materials In the Seven Layer Density Column experiment, I used seven different liquids. Each liquid was measured to a constant volume of 100mL. Then I weighed each sample of liquid to find its mass and calculated its density.
My constant variable was the volume of each sample of liquid. The independent variable that was manipulated was the type of liquid used. The dependent variables were the different masses and densities the samples of liquid had which varied depending on which liquid was being measured. Experimental Design This website had information about the effects of oil spills in river vs. ocean. It explained that different types of oil and different types of water have different densities. It’s important for scientists to know these different densities when deciding how to clean up oil spills. Source 5: “Oil Spills in Rivers.” Office of Response and Restoration/ NOAA’s Ocean Service. n.p. n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013 This website is a good source for the formula for density. It also tells what units are used in showing density. Source 4: “Densities of Common Liquids.” Avlan Design, n.p. n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013 This website is a good source for the formula for density. It also tells what units are used in showing density. Source 3: “What is the formula for density?” wikianswers. Answers Corporation, n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013 This website explains the definition of density. It also explains how to find the density of liquids and solids. Source 2: Matthew Williams. “Density Experiments.” eHow. Demand Media, n.d. Web. 6 Jan 2013 Source 1: Spangler, Steve. “Seven Layer Density Column”. Steve Spangler Science. n.p., n.d. web. 30 Dec 2012
From this website I learned how to do the experiment. I also learned what ingredients and materials I would need. The website also had a table of expected densities which helped me expect my results. Background Research When doing this experiment I expected that, if I layered liquids from heaviest to lightest, then heavier liquids would stay on the bottom supporting the lightest making seven separate layers. Descriptions I read online of this experiment and of the effects of oil spills in rivers made me expect these results. Hypothesis This experiment shows that different liquids can have different densities. Density is how much mass something has in a certain volume.

The experiment was done to find out whether a liquid of greater density could support a lighter liquid.
Knowing how liquids of different densities mix or do not mix can help scientists predict results in their experiments using liquids. Knowing this can also help scientists solve environmental issues such as oil spills. Purpose of the Experiment Seven Layer Density Column Materials Expected Density (g/mL) Mass (g) Volume (mL) Actual Density (g/mL) Lamp Oil (Clear) .80 60 100 .60 Rubbing Alcohol (Pink) .79 74 100 .74 Veg. Oil (Clear) .92 75 100 .75 Water (Green) 1.00 100 100 1.00 Dish Soap (Blue) 1.06 80 100 .80 Corn Syrup (Purple) 1.33 115 100 1.15 Honey 1.42 125 100 1.25 Quantitative Data Analysis Caroline Vanderhoof
Grade 7
Mr. Roberts
A seven layer density column is an experiment to show that liquids of different densities can stay separate even with nothing between them.
I chose this topic from science experiments online because I think it’s interesting how the same amounts of different liquids can have such different weights that they can support each other.
Full transcript