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Disc Brakes

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by

Jason Anderson

on 4 October 2016

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Transcript of Disc Brakes

Disc Brakes
NOT BREAKS
a type of vehicle brake employing the friction of pads against a disc that is attached to the wheel.
Disc Brake Systems
Components
Rotor
Caliper
Pads
Advantages/Disadvantages
Better heat transfer
Faster water shed
Self-Adjusting
Easier to service
Prone to Noise
Rotors warp easier
Not self-energizing
Brake Rotors
Solid
Vented
Drilled
Slotted
Drilled and Slotted
Hub/Solid Mounted
Slip/Floating
Rotor Failures
Calipers
Fixed
Floating
Sliding
Integrated
Caliper Tools
Brake Pads/Friction Materials
Organic
Semi-Metallic
Ceramic
Pros:
Soft, quiet, easy on brake rotors

Don’t require much heat to generate good friction
Produce less dust than metallic pads
Low manufacturing cost
Suitable for normal driving/commuting across many environments
Perfect for every day vehicles and drivers
Cons:
Only operate well within a relatively limited temperature range
Wear out quickly compared to other types of brake pads
High compressibility – can cause “mushy” brake pedal feel
Will quickly lose their coefficient of friction when overheated
Not at all suitable for performance driving
Pros:
Dramatically increased braking performance over organic pads
Have a much higher thermal threshold due to metallic content
Still provide good cold bite
Have a much wider operating range (temperature)
Low compressibility – will provide a firmer brake pedal feel
Much more resistant to brake fade than organic pads
Numerous compounds available – suitable for anything from daily street driving to extreme track use
Cons:
Tend to be noisier than organic or ceramic pads
Produce more brake dust
More abrasive than other types of pads – will wear brake rotors more quickly
More expensive than organic pads (but generally cheaper than ceramic)
Require careful and proper bedding-in for best performance
Pros:
Quieter than semi-metallic pads – emit noises that are above the range of human hearing
Produce finer, lighter-colored brake dust which does not stick to wheels
Longer lifespan than organic or semi-metallic
Stable under a wide range of temperatures for consistent performance
Cons:
Typically the most-expensive type of brake pad
Do not produce as much cold bite as semi-metallic pads – may not be ideal in extremely cold climates
Do not absorb heat as well as semi-metallic pads which can increase brake system temperatures
Good all-around braking characteristics but were never designed as heavy duty/racing brake pads
Wear Indicators/Squeelers
Disc Hardware and Lube
Full transcript