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A Healthy Lifestyle and Your Physical Condition

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James Poulin-Cadovius

on 30 November 2016

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Transcript of A Healthy Lifestyle and Your Physical Condition

What are the elements that define your physical condition?
Physical condition :

A group of cardiovascular and respiratory attributes related to the capacity to accomplish a task that requires energy.
A Healthy Lifestyle and Your Physical Condition
Related to ABILITY
Related to HEALTH
Cardiovascular Endurance
Muscular strength
Muscular endurance
Flexibility
Body Composition
Agility
Balance
Coordination
Speed
Power
Reaction Time
Develop your physical condition using these 5 key principles :
Individual differences
Overload
Progression
Maintaining
Specificity
Multi-dimensionnal health : A philosophy for your well-being.
Physical
Intellectual
Social
Spiritual
Emotional
Environmental
Diabetes
Causes : Unhealthy eating, physical inactivity,
Cancer
Causes : Unhealthy eating, physical inactivity, tobacco and alcohol abuse.
Recurring obstructive pulmonary diseases
Causes : Tobacco
Price tag on bad habits
53 000 000 000 $
8% du PIB (2003)
9.6 billion $
16.7 billion $
6.5 billion $
20.4 billion $
Causes : Unhealthy eating, stress, physical inactivity, tobacco and alcohol abuse
Heart disease
Individual differences
The body's response to physical activity can vary from one individual to the next.

Heredity, nutrition, motivation and lifestyle can influence your body's response to physical activity.
Overload
Your body will adapt to the exercise you do.

To get better, you must do a little more than you are used to.

F I T
(T)


Specificity
Choose exercises that are specific to the part of your body that you want to improve.

If you are looking to improve you upper body strength, there's no need to go for a long run.

( F I T )
T

Progression
A gradual increase in your workload in order to limit the risk of injury and overtraining.
Reversibility
Any adaptation that takes place as a result of training. If you stop training, your gains will progressively be lost or reversed.

Maintain
: When you've reached your ideal fitness level, your workload can be decreased in order to simply maintain you physical capacities.
« Training can be defined as a process of complex actions through which the goal is to act in a methodical and adapted way on the development of physical performance. »
http://www.preparation-physique.net/entrainement-staps/134-principes-fondamentaux-de-lentrainement.html
What is the difference between an interval running workout and a continuous running workout?
The 12 determinants of health
Did you know that over the last century our
life expectancy has increased by 30 years?
Physical Environments
Culture
Gender
Biology and genetic endowment
Healthy child development
FIND OUT MORE!
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/ph-sp/determinants/determinants-eng.php
This deceptively simple story speaks to the complex set of factors or conditions that determine the level of health of every Canadian.

"Why is Jason in the hospital?
Because he has a bad infection in his leg.

But why does he have an infection?
Because he has a cut on his leg and it got infected.

But why does he have a cut on his leg?
Because he was playing in the junk yard next to his apartment building and there was some sharp, jagged steel there that he fell on.

But why was he playing in a junk yard?
Because his neighborhood is kind of run down. A lot of kids play there and there is no one to supervise them.

But why does he live in that neighborhood?
Because his parents can't afford a nicer place to live.

But why can't his parents afford a nicer place to live?
Because his Dad is unemployed and his Mom is sick.

But why is his Dad unemployed?
Because he doesn't have much education and he can't find a job.

But why …?"
Health Services
Income and social status
Social support networks
Employment and working conditions
Social Environments
Personal health practices and coping skills
Education and literacy
Posture
Hygiene
Nutrition
Disease
Stress
Sleep
Physical Condition
Time management
Regular physical activity
Safe physical activity
Health-Related Components
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17sitting-t.html
Is Sitting a Lethal Activity?
By JAMES VLAHOSAPRIL 14, 2011
https://www.facebook.com/BBCFuture/videos/959079100820806/?fref=nf
In order to improve your performance, you must train.
Rest & Recovery
The time needed to repair that damage (caused by training or competing) to your body. Rest and recovery must be integrated into your training programme.

Training everyday will not have the same benefits as your body will not recover as well.
Functional Training
A classification of exercise which involves training the body for the activities performed in daily life.
« Training can be defined as a process of complex actions through which the goal is to act in a methodical and adapted way on the development of physical performance. »
http://www.preparation-physique.net/entrainement-staps/134-principes-fondamentaux-de-lentrainement.html
Increase in neuromuscular coordination.
Increase in stability and balance.
Lowers risks of injury.
Encourages the perception that you are training for a meaningful purpose.
Advantages
Top 5 most devastating habits
Junk food
High levels of stress
Sedentarity
drugs and alcohol abuse
smoking
CORBIN, Charles, B., WELK, Gregory, J., LINDSEY, Ruth et CORBIN, William, R., traduction de Paul Godbout et Marielle Tousignant, Actif & en santé, 5e édition, les éditions Reynald Goulet Inc., Canada, 2004, page 10.
Name the 5 most harmful habits and a health problem or disease that can result.
CORBIN, Charles, B., WELK, Gregory, J., LINDSEY, Ruth et CORBIN, William, R., traduction de Paul Godbout et Marielle Tousignant, Actif & en santé, 5e édition, les éditions Reynald Goulet Inc., Canada, 2004, page 10.
1. Practicing physical activities on a regular basis
2. Eating well
3. Managing your stress
4. Avoiding devastating habits
5. Using protection during sexual practices
6. Adopting safety habits
7. Knowing first aid methods
8. Adopting good personal hygiene habits
9. Asking and following medical advice
10. Being a smart consumer
11. Protecting the environment

Healthy lifestyle habits
Changing your habits
7 essential Nutrients
Functions :

Transport and assimilation of nutrients (blood)
Elimination of toxins (urine)
Regulation of body temperature (sweat)
Transmission of bio-electric currents
Catalysis
Hydrolysis
Cell structure
Functions of Water
For more info :
http://www.alphapole.com/eau-est-un-aliment.php
Energy Expenditure
at rest

50%
Voluntary Physical Activity

20%
Involuntary Physical Activity

12%
Post-meal Thermogenesis

8%
Thermo-regulation

5%

Total Energy Expenditure
(TEX)
Pour en savoir plus :

http://obnet.chez-alice.fr/p02523.htm
http://kinesante.pearsonerpi.com/2012/05/31/on-peut-stimuler-un-metabolisme-qui-a-ralenti-et-voici-comment/
PA Level Men (70 kg) Women (60 kg)

Weak 2200 1800
Average 2500 2000
Strong 2800 2300
Intense 3200 2400

(Calories per day)
(On average)
(PA : Physical Activity)
Total Energy Expenditure (TEX)
Pour en savoir plus :
http://spiral.univ-lyon1.fr/files_m/M1680/Files/703709_1750.pdf
Energy requirements
Definition
:
The energy requirements of an individual corresponds to the minimum quantity of energy the body needs to properly function.

The energy requirements are met only through food intake.

Energy requirements vary according to age, daily physical activity or current state of health. Infants and adolescents have higher relative energy requirements than children and adults. An average active male needs 2600 kcal and an average active female needs 2100 kcal.

Carbohydrates, proteins and fats are the macronutrients that provide energy to the body. The recommended ratio of each is : 55% carbohydrates, 35% fats and 15 % proteins.
Structure of a running workout
Warm Up : (Objective : Prepare your body and raise your temperature,
Alternate jog/walk for 8 to 10minutes
Static and dynamic stretches (10 sec each)
Strides
Workout : (Objective : Progressive muscle fatigue
Continuous - Intervals - Fartlek - Tempo
Cool Down : (Objective : progressively return the body to its normal state)
Alternate jog/walk for 8 to 10minutes
???What are the main parts of a running workout?
Every day tasks will become easier and more accessible.
You will improve the density of your bones and the tensile strength of your ligaments and muscles.
Your posture will improve.
Your base metabolism level will increase and you will burn more calories at rest with your increased muscle mass.
Advantages to Strength Training
Your self-esteem might increase with a leaner and fitter body.
Contraction

Isotonic
: The contraction of a muscle with movement against a natural resistance. Isotonic actually means 'same tension', which is not the case with a muscle that changes in length and natural biomechanics that produce a dynamic resistance curve. This misnomer has prompted authors to propose alternative terms, such as dynamic tension or dynamic contraction.

Isokinetic
: The contraction of a muscle against concomitant force at a constant speed. Diagnostic strength equipment implement isokinetic tension to more accurately measure strength at varying joint angles.

Concentric
: The contraction of a muscle resulting in its shortening.

Eccentric
: The contraction of a muscle during its lengthening.

Dynamic :
The contractions of a muscle resulting in movement. Concentric and eccentric contraction are considered dynamic movements.

Isometric
: The contraction of a muscle without significant movement, also referred to as static tension. Also see Isometric Training.
Movement

Abduction
: Lateral movement away from the midline of the body

Adduction
: Medial movement toward the midline of the body

Circumduction
: circular movement (combining flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction) with no shaft rotation

Extension
: Straightening the joint resulting in an increase of angle

Eversion
: Moving sole of foot away from medial plane

Flexion
: Bending the joint resulting in a decrease of angle

Hyperextension
: extending the joint beyond anatomical position

Inversion
: Moving sole of foot toward medial plane

Pronation
: Internal rotation resulting in appendage facing downward

Protrusion
: Moving anteriorly (e.g.: chin out)

Supination
: External rotation resulting in appendage facing upward

Retrusion
: Moving posteriorly (e.g.: chin in)

Rotation
: Rotary movement around the longitudinal axis of the bone
Types of Strength Training
Strength endurance
: The capacity of the neuromuscular system to maintain or repeat a sub-maximal contraction:

Relative Strength
: Corresponds to the ratio between your weight and the maximum load that your body can move.

Absolute Strength
: Corresponds to the maximum load that your body can move.

Power
: The capacity of a muscle or group of muscles to execute its maximum contraction at the highest speed. (Force x speed)
MUSCULAR STRENGTH
Relative Strength
Power (explosiveness)
Strength Endurance
Absolute Strength
Maximum Strength
Proteins
: Help repair/develop muscle tissues
Carbohydrates
: Provide energy (short term)
Fats
: Store energy (long term)
Fibers
: Speed up digestion and transport through intestinal organs.
Vitamins
: Promote normal growth/metabolism and protection against certain diseases.
Minerals
: Help with heart function, metabolism, bones/teeth formation.
Water
: Helps with absorption of nutrients, transport of toxins out of the body, regulation of body temperature.


Not on exam
THE BORG SCALE
Which sport are you made for?
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-28062001
http://www.lapresse.ca/actualites/sante/201608/18/01-5011676-les-mauvaises-habitudes-des-canadiens-leur-coutent-six-annees-de-vie.php?utm_categorieinterne=trafficdrivers&utm_contenuinterne=cyberpresse_B13b_sante_562_section_POS1
https://www.facebook.com/upliftconnect/videos/846444885492494/
http://ici.radio-canada.ca/premiere/emissions/les-eclaireurs
http://plus.lapresse.ca/screens/100aaade-5723-4505-984d-ad36f8696fcb%7C_0.html
http://www.marianne.net/malbouffe-nous-rend-plus-malades-que-alcool-tabac-reunis-100246821.html
https://www.facebook.com/fantasticworld/videos/640728632775693/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED
https://www.facebook.com/784474001687585/videos/864482417020076/?hc_ref=NEWSFEED
Goals and objectives
S
M
A
R
T

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/premiere/emissions/les-eclaireurs/2016-2017/segments/chronique/8427/adolescents-surconsommation-maladie

Pur Instinct
What are the 3 founding principles?
1) Sport must allow an improvement of the physical condition and slow the aging process. Also to necessarily minimize risks of injury and head traumas.

2) Sport must allow a sense of euphoria, pleasure and help reduce daily stress.

3) Sport must lead humans to a state of advanced concentration.
Rules
Full transcript